La Salle University Slashing $11,600 Off Tuition

La Salle - stacks in the library

Photo by Matthew Chverchko, courtesy La Salle University

La Salle University is cutting tuition prices by 29 percent — reducing tuition from $40,400 to $28,800 for the 2017-18 school year. Students will pay the same rates they did in 2008 for the next school year. The college had previously frozen tuition for the 2016-17 school year.

“The cost of higher education continues to spiral year after year, with no end in sight,” La Salle President Colleen Hanycz said in a release. “We cannot continue to assume that this issue will fix itself someday, somehow — the tuition model for higher education is broken. La Salle is working to reshape that model so college becomes an affordable reality for students and their families.”

The university has dubbed its tuition reduction “An Affordable Path for All.” The only students that will receive a full tuition reduction of $11,600 are those paying the full share of the tuition. La Salle says 97 percent of its students receive some kind of financial aid. La Salle spokesperson Jaine Lucas says most students are getting $1,000 and $1,500 reductions in their tuition bill.

Tuition may go up in the coming years, but it will rise off the $28,800 base. The tuition cut does not change fees or room and board costs. Read more »

Villanova Moves Forward With Decision to Arm Public Safety Force

University entrance at the corner of Ithan and Lancaster Avenues.

University entrance at the corner of Ithan and Lancaster Avenues.                       Photo via villanova.edu

In an email sent Monday, Villanova University Public Safety Director and Chief of Police David Tedjeske updated students, faculty, and staff with the news that the university’s newly minted police department now has three sworn officers, and counting. According to a report by VUHoops, these officers have completed a 22-week police academy training, have access to law enforcement databases, can directly communicate with law enforcement by radio, and have the power to stop, question, and detain individuals. In addition to a firearm, officers will carry batons, handcuffs, bulletproof vests, pepper spray and body cameras. Officers will continue to be phased in, with a projected total of 19 to be hired over the course of the year.

In October of 2015, the decision to arm 20 percent of the campus public safety was publicized in an email sent by University President Rev. Peter M. Donohue, O.S.A., Ph.D., and was met almost immediately with protest. Students and faculty organized marches and open forums, videos were produced, and various organizations took to social media with the hashtag #OurPublicSafety to encourage a reversal of the decision. In November, Donohue publicly engaged with the community’s concerns at a town hall style meeting, but ultimately announced that the decision would not be overturned.  Read more »

University of Delaware Considers Changing Spring Break Schedule

university of delaware

Officials at the University of Delaware are considering an alteration to the school’s spring break schedule, according to a report from the Associated Press. The change would make the school’s break align with the breaks of other colleges in the area. The potential scheduling change comes after Willem Golden, a freshman student from Skidmore College in Saratoga Springs, New York, died at an off-campus party in MarchRead more »

Faculty Across 14 Pennsylvania Universities Could Vote on Strike

A union representing faculty at 14 state-owned universities in Pennsylvania is discussing the possibility of a strike.

The Association of Pennsylvania State College and University Faculties union said new contract negotiations with the Pennsylvania State Higher System of Education have been “stagnant.”

The faculty contract expired nearly a year ago.

On August 25th, if the majority of delegates from each of its 14 campuses approve, the APSCUF will decide on whether or not to vote on holding a strike.

The union previously postponed a strike-authorization vote set for April “out of concern for students,” according to a press release.

Read more »

Katie McGinty Wasn’t Really the First in Her Family to Attend College

McGinty

Democratic Senate candidate Katie McGinty has frequently claimed throughout her campaign that she was first in her family to attend college, but a BuzzFeed report released Wednesday shows otherwise.

McGinty’s older brother, John McGinty, appears to have graduated before her – in fact, the La Salle University registrar’s office told BuzzFeed Thursday that John attended the university in January of 1971 and graduated in 1973 as part of a two-year program.

It’s also listed on his Facebook page.

This would all be fine if McGinty had specified that she was first in her family to attend a four-year university program, but she wasn’t always so clear.

Read more »

Penn Is Now Noting Disciplinary Violations on Student Transcripts

Terracotta Heraldry on the Duhring Wing.   | Steven Minicola, University of Pennsylvania  Communications.

Terracotta Heraldry on the Duhring Wing. | Steven Minicola, University of Pennsylvania Communications.

Last week, the University of Pennsylvania announced that students who violate its academic integrity, student conduct or sexual violence codes will no longer be eligible for Latin graduation honors — those “cum laude” notations that look so sexy on a diploma — or for inclusion on its Dean’s List. “In addition,” according to the official announcement, “when a student receives a sanction of probation, suspension or expulsion from the Office of Student Conduct or the Sexual Violence Investigative Officer, that sanction will be part of the student’s permanent record and, therefore, reportable outside of Penn.”

That means if you get caught smoking pot in your freshman year, or cheat on a test, or are convicted by a campus tribunal of failing to ask permission before kissing your boyfriend, your violation of school rules will now be fodder for potential employers and graduate schools. Read more »

The Philly Area Schools That Rejected Barack Obama’s and Tom Hanks’ College Applications

Barack Obama in his official Senate portrait. Tom Hanks, Photo | Alan Light, CC BY 2.0.

Barack Obama in his official Senate portrait. Tom Hanks, Photo | Alan Light, CC BY 2.0.

I was reading something the other day — I can’t remember what, because the Internet has made reading 80,000 things a day way too easy — in which the author commented snidely on adults who remember their SAT scores. I flushed with embarrassment, because, naturally, I remember my SAT scores. (They were pretty good.) In my experience, most people remember their SAT scores, just like they remember the colleges that rejected their applications (okay for you, Princeton; who’d want to go to Ted Cruz’s college, anyway?) for the rest of their lives.

That may be why I, um, clicked through recently to a slideshow that revealed what colleges rejected some Very Famous People, and thereby learned that I’m in great company. Tina Fey was also rejected by Princeton. (OMG, she and Lyin’ Ted would have been in the same class!John Kerry, Tom Brokow, Matt Groening and Meredith Vieira were rejected by Harvard. (Vieira reports she was “devastated.”) Katie Couric was turned down by Smith. (Who gets turned down by Smith?) Read more »

Ursinus Isn’t the Only College With Hundreds of Sick Kids

Norovirus. Image | NIH

Norovirus. Image | NIH

We thought kids these days only communicated over their iPhones and existed curled on their beds in miserable isolation, but we must be wrong, since the nation’s college campuses are being swept by contagious disease. An article in Inside Higher Ed reflects on the current wave of epidemics, which include 200 sick with norovirus — which was the culprit at Ursinus College locally back in February — at Miami University of Ohio, 150 downed at the University of Michigan, 120 at Boston U. in December (they’d all been to Chipotle) and dozens at UC Berkeley.

There’s some cool stuff about how plucky Ursinus soldiered through its ordeal (“They came in waves,” says campus medical director Paul Dogramji), by closing the dining hall and drenching the campus in hand sanitizers while students hashtagged #ursinusplague and armed themselves with samurai swords. Dogramji notes, interestingly, that none of the school’s medical staff came down with the bug (“If you exercise good prevention methods, even if you have close contact, you won’t necessarily get it”), and that a campus is a lot like a cruise ship, another closed environment that’s seen massive outbreaks of contagious disease. Read more »

Two Philly Colleges Among Best at Bridging Gap Between Humans and Computers

Drexel -Phila U

While technology is made to advance, it’s also made to be accessible. UX Design, an emerging field of computer science and engineering, is closing the gap between humans and computers, allowing new innovations to be comprehensible, constructive and coherent. These platforms include User Interface (UI), Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) and Human-Centered Computing.

Graduate schools across the country are working hard to improve human-computer interaction — and Philadelphia colleges are no different. Now two schools in Philly have been ranked in the Top 50 Best Value UX Design Graduate Programs of 2016 by Value Colleges. Read more »

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