Officials to Introduce the Richboro Master Plan Next Week

The former Grist Mill at the Willow Mill Complex in Richboro | Photo credit: Wikimedia Commons

The former Grist Mill at the Willow Mill Complex in Richboro | Photo credit: Wikimedia Commons

Bucks Local reports the Bucks County Planning Commission and Northampton Town officials will hold a public meeting next week to introduce citizens to the beginning stages of the Richboro Master Plan, a new planning initiative set to revitalize the Northampton village.

According to Bucks Local, the meeting is meant as a way to not only inform residents of what changes are projected for the area, but to encourage public input for the plan officials and planners hope will bring the village up to speed:

The village, located at the crossroads of Routes 332 and 232, has had a rich history and has played a fundamental role in the development of the township. As the township transformed from a rural farming economy to a modern suburb, Richboro has faced many challenges. Traffic congestion, land use concerns, and environmental constraints have led to the need to reevaluate the village in a comprehensive fashion, said officials.

The town hall meeting will take place at the Northampton Township Building (55 Township Road, Richboro, PA) on Thursday February 12th at 7:00pm.

Town Hall meeting to solicit public input on the future of Richboro; initiative moving forward to revitalize crossroads village [Bucks Local]

Morning Headlines: Bucks County Is in Development Slump

Bucks County Courthouse. Photo credit: Wikimedia Commons.

Bucks County Courthouse.
Photo credit: Wikimedia Commons.

Yesterday’s headline in the Bucks County Courier-Times was not encouraging: “Bucks report shows sluggish development.” James McGinnis’ list of superlatives was no less damning:

Applications for new housing and industry remain at some of the lowest levels recorded in more than a generation.

Proposals for new commercial development are at the lowest levels recorded in 32 years.

The Bucks County Planning Commission estimates builders would “impact” just 368 acres. That’s the lowest amount ever recorded by the county.

There were several communities that had zero development — zilch — including Langhorne, Upper Southampton and Yardley. There is some good news, though.

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