11 Things To Do In Philly This Weekend: Franklin Flea Winter Market Opens, Franklin Square Holiday Festival, Dilworth Park Ice Skating Rink Opens and More



Bill Cosby’s Art Collection On Display at Smithsonian

More than 60 artworks from Bill and Camille Cosby’s private art collection are now on display with pieces of African works at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African Art in Washington.

This is the first time the works have been shown to the public. According to AP, the pieces include everything from “a masterwork that had remained hidden for a half-century before Camille Cosby recognized its value, to a quilt made from their slain son’s clothes (he was killed in 1997).” More about the Cosby works in “Conversations: African and African American Artworks in Dialogue”:

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THE ONE: Artist Sarah Kaizar On “Mars Show”

"We've been here before, but it's new every time" by Sarah Kaizar.

“We’ve done this before, but it’s new every time” by Sarah Kaizar.

Local artist and Tyler School of Art grad Sarah Kaizar is showing her latest works in a solo exhibit called “Mars Show,” open now through November 30th at 3rd Street Gallery. We chatted with her about the show’s subject—mental health care and the Mars rover experiments—and its signature piece, “We’ve done this before, but it’s new every time” (above).

How and when did you create “We’ve done this before, but it’s new every time”? I’ve been working on this project on and off since August 2013. This piece is drawn with a mix of materials (pencil, ink, paint, tape, chalk, conté crayon, powdered graphite … ) on layers of vellum and acrylic resin. I have never worked this way before, so the drawing had a few false starts; you can actually see that process in the piece because of the translucency of the materials.

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Lynch-Themed Exhibit Opens at Kensington’s Pterodactyl

PJ Smalley’s portrait of Dale Cooper | Photo via Christian Sarkis Graham

PJ Smalley’s portrait of Dale Cooper. | Photo via Christian Sarkis Graham

Is there really any time as fitting as Halloween weekend to open a show in praise and commemoration of David Lynch? (Okay besides Father’s Day. Or Thanksgiving.)

“I was thinking, ‘How would Dale Cooper go about curating a show?’ He would be very earnest, with almost a Boy Scout sincerity; but he would still engage elements of the surreal and the strange. He would go about it as a tribute to his creator; in a lot of ways, Dale Cooper is the ultimate Lynch self-portrait.”

So explains PJ Smalley, the artist behind the arguable centerpiece of Pterodactyl gallery’s David Lynch-themed exhibit, “Catching the Big Fish,” which held its opening reception Saturday night.

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“Playing Angels” Sculpture Returns to Kelly Drive

Yesterday a beloved sculpture was restored to its proper place in Fairmount. Carl Milles’ “Playing Angels” have danced and played in the grass above Kelly Drive since 1972 and recently received a long-awaited makeover.

The Office of Arts, Culture and the Creative Economy (Creative Philadelphia) had the “Playing Angels” fully restored and reengineered their anchoring system, so now they can be enjoyed for decades to come. The angels were cast from a group of five originals created by the famous Swedish sculptor around 1950, which currently reside in Millesgården, overlooking Sweden’s Stockholm harbor.



According to the Association for Public Art, the five casts were originally headed for a private site in Philadelphia. When plans fell through, one angel headed to Kansas City and another to Virginia. The Association for Public Art (then called the Fairmount Park Art Association) bought the other three in 1968 and installed them four years later.

The playful bronze casts sit lightly atop concrete pedestals – similar to those at Millesgården – giving them the appearance of flight. Now the “Playing Angels” can once again be seen frolicking in the sky while they make their music where Kelly Drive meets Fountain Green Drive, overlooking the Schuylkill River.

Photos courtesy of the Association for Public Art.

What’s Worth Seeing in October: Neil Young, Thurston Moore, Midtown Village Fall Festival, and More

neil young

Neil Young

Neil Young
October 8th and 9th
Academy of Music
The gritty Canadian singer and guitarist has always had a huge Philadelphia fan base, and his shows here are the stuff of legend. He performed a solo set and one with Crosby, Stills and Nash at Live Aid, he headlined a special 2008 concert to commemorate the end of the Spectrum, and his 2007 Tower shows were memorialized by filmmaker Jonathan Demme in the documentary Neil Young Trunk Show. If you don’t catch at least one of his two performances here this month, you’ll be missing out.

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Studio of Artist Andrew Wyeth Named National Historic Landmark

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The National Park Service has expanded a local national landmark to include the longtime studio of one of the best-known artists of the mid-20th century, Andrew Wyeth. Wyeth, who passed away in 2009 at the age of 91, is known for his realist paintings. The son of famous illustrator N. C. Wyeth, Andrew spent many years studying and painting his hometown of Chadds Ford. Some of his favorite subjects included his neighbors, Anna and Karl Kuerner, and their farm. The farm was also where Wyeth met Helga Testorf, a caregiver who became the subject of many of his paintings in the 70s and 80s.

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PHOTOS: Barbara Proud’s First Comes Love Book Launch at UArts

A book launch and reception was held Friday night at University of the Arts for photographer and Associate Professor Barbara Proud’s new page-turner First Comes Love: Portraits of Enduring LGBTQ Relationships (Soleil Press).



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PHOTOS: Have You Seen the Giant Chair in the Lobby at the Kimmel Center?

If you haven’t been to the Kimmel Center lately, you may be surprised when you walk in to see a giant chair dwarfing the lobby and all the attendants scurrying around underneath. Simply called “Folding Deck Chair,” the work, by multi-disciplinary artist Tristin Lowe, is part of a rotating collection of works from the West Collection—the same folks who donated those busts of composers made out of pages of books.

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