Why You Should Definitely Back Felt + Fat’s Kickstarter

We’re positively enamored. | Images via Instagram

This month in the print edition of Philadelphia magazine, we called out the Port Richmond-based ceramics line, Felt + Fat and teased an upcoming Kickstarter campaign. Well, exciting news: their Kickstarter is finally live and it’s your chance to nab some painfully cool dishware for yourself. Who knew we’d ever be this psyched about plates? Read more »

Philly Skyline, Ben Franklin and Emojis Created Out of Cans at New Exhibit at Liberty Place

It may seem like a supermarket nightmare waiting to happen: piles of cans, some ten feet tall, looming over busy shoppers. But these aren’t your normal Shop Rite goods. Canstruction, the charitable organization sponsoring a massive sculpture installation at the Shops at Liberty Place, is doing all of this for a good cause.

It is the ninth anniversary of the Canstruction contest in Philly, which is one of over 100 cities worldwide taking part in the event. Local teams of architects, engineers, contractors, design firms and schools of design create the massive can-based sculptures to raise hunger awareness. In Philly alone, the eight previous Canstruction displays collected over 250,000 pounds of food for Philabundance.

We snapped some shots of the super-cool sculptures, which are on display through April 26th. You can find out more about Canstruction by visiting their webpage and using hashtag #CANstructionPHL when chatting about the project on social media.



Artist Sets Up “Selfie Zones” in Philadelphia

A photo posted by Kid Hazo (@kidhazo) on

Philadelphia street artist Kid Hazo — he of the giant PPA parking ticket and the Claes Oldenburg paint-dollop turned poop emoji — put a few new pieces on the streets this morning: Selfie zones.

Unlike the No Selfie Zone prank by Jena Kingsley, Kid Hazo is actually encouraging people to take them — a fresh change of pace from the anti-selfie propaganda constantly spewed by the media. Read more »

There’s a 900-Pound Gorilla Sculpture Made Out of Car Hoods at Philadelphia Zoo

"Blue Gorilla" by Don Kennell

“Blue Gorilla” by Don Kennell

The Philadelphia Zoo is home to a whole new crew of creatures, thanks to a new exhibit comprising animal sculptures made with recycled, renewed, reused and repurposed materials.

“Second Nature: Junk Rethunk” is on display now at the Zoo. Twelve artists from across the globe got together to make the 70 eco-friendly artworks that are made out of everything from burned-out spark plugs and recycled plastic bottles to wads of chewing gum.

Read more »

New Sculpture Erected Along Schuylkill River Trail

Photo by Margot Berg  / Creative Philadelphia

Photo by Margot Berg / Creative Philadelphia

Joggers, roller-bladers and that one woman who skips along the Schuylkill River trail will notice a new sculpture marking their path.

“Air,” a work by Philadelphia sculptor Walker Hancock was erected after a $30,000 renovation. It had been sitting in storage since 1999, when the Civic Center, where it was initially erected, was destroyed. More on its history from Newsworks:

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These Miniature Sculptures by Philly-Based Artist Are Too Cute for Words

scupltures

Images via Mackenzie McAlpin

The latest objects to get the Honey, I Shrunk the Kids treatment? These adorable — and crazily collectible — sculptures by Philly artist Mackenzie McAlpin. The precious miniatures are recreations of some of our favorite normal-sized objects (think pancakes and syrup). They’re the best kind of nicknack because they don’t take up too much space. Are they exceedingly functional? Not quite, but they still pack a visual punch when tidily clustered or sprinkled upon a shelf.

Select a sampling of the quirky minis from the recently-launched site of McAlpin. It’s stocked to the brim with scaled-down mugs, planters and tacos. (So. Good.) Smitten yet? We’re already brainstorming desk arrangements.  Read more »

Check Out This Beautiful Graffiti Made Out of Silk

You might know Aubrie Costello from her day job as store manager of Bus Stop. But when she’s not at the Queen Village boutique, she’s creating incredible art installations on the walls of residential homes, in store windows, and for galleries. She refers to her work as ‘silk graffiti,’ but it’s far more subtle than what we typically think of when we think of graffiti. Her pieces are haunting phrases, quotes or simple words, rendered in looping strips of shredded silk that she tacks to the wall with nails.  Read more »

Carré d’artistes New Philly Location Makes Original World-Class Artwork Accessible

Nadia Martina Michelin, one of the artists currently featured at Carré d'artistes.

Nadia Martina Michelin, one of the artists currently featured at Carré d’artistes.

Carré d’artistes is a known name across the pond in Europe, but for most Philadelphians, the new gallery that opened at 104 South 13th Street in what felt like warp speed may seem like a strange, foreign concept. However, all reservations are swept away once you walk inside the charming, streamlined space. Read more »

Philanthropy Friday: Leeway Foundation

Every Friday we spotlight a local LGBT nonprofit in Philadelphia. This week: the Leeway Foundation, which supports women and trans* artists and cultural producers working in communities at the intersection of art, culture, and social change. 

Denise Brown, executive director of the Leeway Foundation.

Denise Brown, executive director of the Leeway Foundation. | Photo by Noelle Theard

Who are you? Denise Brown, executive director of the Leeway Foundation. Through grantmaking and other programs, Leeway promotes artistic expression that amplifies the voices of those on the margins, promotes sustainable and healthy communities, and works in the service of movements for economic and social justice. Leeway believes that art can bridge difference, center those who have been on the margins, and challenge and connect communities and individuals to live in peaceful coexistence.

When was Leeway founded? Leeway Foundation began in 1993 as an organization dedicated to supporting women artists in the Philadelphia area.  In the late 1990s, Leeway’s leadership grew its commitment to art as a means of helping achieve social change. Over the past ten years, Leeway’s donor family, its Board of Directors, staff, and Advisory Council worked to transform the Foundation in several remarkable ways. They engaged people of color in positions of influence, and committed to a process of dismantling racism in organizational relationships, practices, policies, and programs. They moved decision-making power from a single-family member structure to a board comprised of people from the community, and committed to an active framework of personal and political transformation.  They expanded Leeway’s mission to support both women and trans people who make art as a means for transforming individuals and communities.

Read more »

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