The Revisit: Amada

Amada | Courtesy of Garces Group

Amada | Courtesy of Garces Group

When he opened Amada nine years ago, Jose Garces had two visions for his debut restaurant. Only one survived—succeeding so lucratively that it suffocated the other.

You can still visit the latter’s burial place, though: just ask for one of the best six seats in the house.

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Restaurant Week Pick for Monday, January 20th

Amada | Photo by Ashley Catharine Smith

Amada | Photo by Ashley Catharine Smith

Looking for a Restaurant Week pick for tonight? Hustle and get that 8 p.m. table for two at Amada. It’s one of the solid Restaurant Week performers and a prime-time table is tough to beat.


Not interested in Restaurant Week, how about Lobster Week. That’s what Matyson is offering tonight through Thursday.

Check out their special five course, $50 menu.

Check out Matyson’s Lobster Week menu » 

For Lunch, Consider an Amada Cheesesteak

amada-cheesesteak

As we’ve mentioned before, one of our biggest laments about the current state of the cheesesteak is the lack of beef. At too many places, a cheesesteak is north of $9 for way too little steak and not a lick of creativity.

On the other hand there’s the Amada Cheesesteak on the lunch menu at Jose Garces’ first restaurant in Old City. At Amada, the cheesesteak is shaved ribeye, caramelized onions, a molten Mahón cheese sauce and truffled mushrooms. Yes, the sandwich costs $14, but there’s a whole lot more going on here than just cheap beef  and fake cheese.

Amada [Official Site]

Philadelphia Restaurant Week: Planning A Killer Friday

10artsTagliatelle

Okay, folks. So we’re coming the end of stage one of Philadelphia Restaurant Week. For most places, Friday marks a brief respite before things pick up again on Sunday, and in celebration of that, we figured why not make a day of it tomorrow–hitting both a lunch and a dinner spot for the deals offered.

First stop? 10Arts, where chef Nathan Volz has been getting plenty of practice knocking out those plates of tagliatelle pomodoro with fresh mozzarella pictured above. He’s offering a creamy seafood chowder as one of the first-course lunch options (putting it up against a Honeycrisp apple salad), then the tagliatelle (which, when stacked up against a croque monsieur, is an easy choice), with either a carrot-hazelnut cake with carrot sauce and cream cheese sorbet or a pina colada sundae with rum gel and coconut foam as dessert.

Both of those sound weirdly compelling. Wonder what it’d cost me to double-up on dessert? And honestly, with the lunch price coming in at just $20, would it really matter?

But where should we go for dinner?

Six Pack: Empanadas In Philly

One could argue that the two best things in the world are meat and fried food. If you are the type of person who would make such an argument, then feast your eyes on the empanada. 

The empanada is a crispy pastry stuffed with meat, cheese, fruit, or anything in between, depending on the chef. Most typically served in Latin cuisine, the empanada can count as a small snack or an appetizer leading up to a gut-busting meal.

Luckily for you, Philadelphia has several options to satisfy any one of your empanada cravings.

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Six Pack: Suckling Pig In Philadelphia

 

Editor’s Note: This week, we’re going to be introducing our new army of interns to you, the Foobooz readership. And it occurred to us that what better way for you to get to know them a little then for them to tell you all about something they loved to eat. Thus, we set them each to assembling their own Foobooz Six Pack, focusing on something they loved.

Our first submission came from Alex Tewfik, a student at Saint Joseph’s University in Philadelphia, PA. As a food and restaurant enthusiast, Alex spends every waking moment of his day inventing new ways to keep himself eating while hiding how fat he actually is from the rest of the world.

Take it away, Alex…

Matyson’s Suckling Pig Sundays are no more. They have moved on to bigger things. Fortunately, the rest of the city hasn’t. So if you need to satiate your suckling pig cravings, there are plenty of places in and around the city that know how to cook that piglet just right. So with that in mind, here it is: The best places to get suckling pig in Philadelphia.

Slow Roasted Suckling Pig at Il Pittore

Chef Chris Painter’s claim to fame at his semi-eponymous restaurant, Il Pittore, takes three whole days to perfect, and that’s exactly what it ends up being: perfect. Cured in salt, sugar, and herbs for 15 hours, it’s then slow roasted for 12 hours, then buried in pig fat, then portioned and pressed over night. The slow-roasted meat sits on a bed of whole baby carrots and sautéed cavalo nero, swimming in a rich guanciale jus. Crowned with sweet pear mostarda, this pig is a real beauty.

Il Pittore (Rittenhouse)
2025 Sansom Street
215-391-4900

More suckling pig this way…

Jose Garces to Cook for Philabundance at The Porch

Looks like the always busy Jose Garces is in town this week for a good cause. This Thursday from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.  Garces and his restaurants will be making an appearance at The Porch at 30th Street Station to support Philabundance. Five of the Iron Chef’s restaurants will be represented at The Porch. For a $10 donation to Philabundance event goers will be treated to samples from Amada, Chifa, Distrito, Guapos Tacos, and JG Domestic. What’s more, Garces himself will be doing a cooking demonstration at the event from noon to 1 p.m.

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