Presented by CanadianInsulin.com

New Options Help Diabetes Patients Fight Rising Insulin Costs

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Health and wellness have become commodities in a nation where drug costs have been labeled highest in the world, leaving Americans frustrated, financially burdened and potentially in medical crisis. For some, it’s a choice between groceries and important maintenance medication like insulin; a situation less than ideal for any diabetic requiring daily insulin. With the price of insulin at an all-time high, diabetes patients are left desperately seeking relief.

Thankfully there is some, for those willing to shop cross-border. Today, everything from electronics to clothing and even groceries is available online in just a few clicks. Now, so is your monthly medication, available at a fraction of the cost, complete with the convenience of temperature-controlled shipping to your door. As drug and healthcare costs continue to frustrate the over 30 million Americans living with type 1 or 2 diabetes, many are opting to get their insulin and other medication from certified pharmacies in neighboring Canada, a country known for stringent food and drug safety standards where government-enforced drug pricing caps ensure affordable medication is accessible to all.

For the type 1 diagnosis, not having access to affordable insulin is not an option. When the body cannot produce its own insulin — a hormone produced by the pancreas that allows your body to convert sugar (glucose) levels in the blood into energy — the sufferer can run the risk of heart disease, kidney failure, stroke and even blindness. Despite the risks, many diabetics are feeling boxed in, opting to take less than their recommended dose of insulin or not taking their medication at all because they can’t afford the cost.

That makes the cost of insulin a life or death situation, and it’s one that many high-cost drug corporations are trying to sweep under the rug. Between 2002 and 2013, insulin prices more than tripled, causing patients to wonder when — or if — the cost of insulin in the United States has a ceiling. For some, the price surge means that living with the disease could be a six thousand dollar a year burden at a minimum, even with the aid of insurance plans (many of which include high deductibles). Thankfully, the public and public health professionals are fighting to shed light on this issue, but we still have a long way to go.

Canadian Insulin has a mission to provide low-cost Insulin to our customers in a safe and secure method. To learn more, visit canadianinsulin.com.

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