The Best Vintage Clothing Stores in Philadelphia

From dapper Gatsby-style duds to Twiggy’s dresses, Philly’s cluster of high-end vintage clothing boutiques proves that once-worn is the new black.

Briar Vintage, a vintage clothing store in Old City, Philadelphia

Philly’s top vintage shops have everything from designer duds (some even worn by clotheshorses including Edie Sedgwick and Twiggy!) to a sweet selection of dapper pieces for gentleman. Here, where to find the best (pre-loved) treasures in the city.

Briar Vintage

Old City62 North 3rd St
Manager David Lochner is a surprising amalgamation of styles. A former construction worker covered in t­attoos, he dresses like a 1930s dandy. And his shop—which he opened with Amanda Saslow, owner of next-door Sazz Vintage—is just as surprising: It’s all menswear—a rarity—and boasts an impressive collection of high-end apparel, accessories and ephemera from the 1800s through the ’60s. Mainly, though, the shop is a celebration of Jazz Age pomp married with industrial edge. The smart mix makes the flat-front suspendered pants, Edwardian cuff links and natty tweed blazers (complete with leather elbow patches) feel less costume, more cool.
Go here for: Authentic ’20s style.

Sazz Vintage

Old City60 North 3rd St
For rockabilly or disco duds, head first to the website of this 3rd Street stalwart, or to its bulk vintage warehouse sales on Coral Street on Mondays and Saturdays from noon to 6 p.m. (Be prepared to dig.) For an edited selection of its decidedly non-Halloween fare, visit Sazz’s brick-and-mortar. A recent trip yielded a 1960s gold sequined coat for $120, plucked from racks of flouncy dresses and tissue-thin lacy slips. Peek in the glass-front cabinet in the back for cool add-ons like mother-of-pearl cat-eye sunnies. go here for: Cocktail dresses from the ’50s and ’60s and a fall-perfect selection of cowboy boots.
Go here for: Cocktail dresses from the ’50s and ’60s and a fall-perfect selection of cowboy boots.

Philadelphia Vintage and Consignment Shoppe

Midtown Village111 South 12th St
Scour the racks at Johnny Columbo’s tiny, cluttered vintage shop and you’ll be rewarded with heavy sequined gowns by Halston, iconic Geoffrey Beene separates and bold Pucci prints. Many of the pieces have been culled from the collections of the world’s most esteemed clotheshorses: Twiggy, Edie Sedgwick, Joan Crawford. Columbo’s client list is equally impressive: Reese Witherspoon, costume designers for Mad Men and Downton Abbey, and Philly style-setters like Joan Shepp. go here for: A vintage museum of posh pieces, along with more wallet-friendly finds.
Go here for: A vintage museum of posh pieces, along with more wallet-friendly finds.

1600 Below Vintage

Queen Village613 Bainbridge St
Maria Furey used to sell her semi-secret cache of vintage in the basement of her dad’s East Passyunk flooring store, Reliable Floorcoverings. Both moved a few weeks ago to new Queen Village digs, where there’s even more space for Furey’s racks of well-priced dresses (from $35 to $65), frothy tulle underslips, fur-trimmed coats and vintage costume jewelry, most of which she snags at local estate sales. go here for: Ultra-affordable ways to inject a bit of vintage into your wardrobe.
Go here for: Ultra-affordable ways to inject a bit of vintage into your wardrobe

Cultured Couture

Old City240 Church St
The second installment of owner Erik Honesty’s Northern Liberties location, this little gem features a whole wall of spunky ladies’ items (think sparkly Miu Miu heels), but the focus is on timeless essentials for guys: preppy button-downs, imposing shelves of Prada and Gucci bags, and plenty of slacks, ties and blazers, from Brooks Brothers to Bill Blass. Budgeting tip: Leave room in your wallet for offbeat scores like a vintage leather moto jacket.
Go here for: A pedigreed collection of basics for gentlemen.




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