Little Nonna’s

  • Cuisine:
  • Alcohol: Full Bar
  • Meals Served: Dinner, Lunch
  • Price: $$
  • Accepts Credit Cards: Yes
  • Hours: Lunch: Monday-Saturday, 11:45-3 p.m.; Dinner: monday-thursday 5-10 p.m., Friday-Saturday 5-11 p.m. sunday 5-10pm

Latest About Little Nonna’s

It’s A Summer Seafood Party On 13th Street

summerseafood.jpgSummer ain’t over yet. At least not on 13th Street, where Marcie Turney and Val Safran are running three nights of seafood specials at their restaurants to celebrate all the bountiful (and delicious) sea critters we eat during the hottest months.

From Sunday, August 10, through Tuesday, August 12, there will be special seafood-inspired menus, with beverage pairings, offered at each of their four popular Midtown Village restaurants. We’re talking ceviches at Lolita, a crab boil at Jamonera, lobster spaghetti at Little Nonna’s, and a mixed seafood grill at Barbuzzo. The dinners are running $45 per person (which includes a paired drink), excluding tax and gratuity. Check out all the menus after the jump.

Read more »




Best of Philly 2014 Preview: LGBT Winners

best-of-philly-2014-logo-400x400

Gay Bar: U Bar

There isn’t a dance floor in the whole place, and drag-queen sightings are rare. But that’s exactly what’s so great about the bar formerly known as Uncles. (Well, that and the studly bartenders.) U Bar stands apart from other Gayborhood watering holes as a no-fuss, no-’tude, unpretentious spot to grab a strong drink or two and gab with friends. 1220 Locust Street, Midtown Village, 215-546-6660.

Read more »

Little Nonna’s in the New York Times

Spaghetti and meatballs at Little Nonna's | Photo by Jason Varney

Spaghetti and meatballs at Little Nonna’s | Photo by Jason Varney

Ingrid Williams visits Little Nonna’s for the New York Times. The only flaw she finds is in the pricy wine list.

[O]n a chilly evening in November, I couldn’t resist the Sunday gravy. A heaping portion of “gravy” (marinara made with San Marzano tomatoes) and paccheri (the macaroni of the day) arrived on one platter, and on another were assorted meats — pork braciole, spicy fennel sausage, meatballs stuffed with fontina. Other memorable dishes deviated from the traditional tried and true, like bruschetta with roasted figs, Gorgonzola dolce, celery hearts and crunchy hazelnuts. And a standout pasta dish featured braised duck, pecorino and turnips atop chestnut ravioli stuffed with roasted heirloom squash.

Restaurant Report: Little Nonna’s in Philadelphia [New York Times]
Little Nonna’s [Foobooz]

« ALL POSTS ABOUT Little Nonna's