Boot and Saddle

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Latest About Boot and Saddle

5 Things to Do in Philly this Week: Tune-Out, TuneIn, Timberlake and More

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Tuesday Tune-out: PhilaMOCA’s weekly Tuesday Tune-Out revives old-fashioned picture show interest for the Netflix-weary. This week’s installation pairs live scoring from Philly-based Marlo Reynolds and Phil Benson with John Schenk’s abstract-experimental feature Blue Wonder. It’s like the movies, but without Gerard Butler, and with beer.  TuesdayFebruary 25, 7:30 p.m., $5, PhilaMOCA, 531 North 12th Street.  

More things to do after the jump


60 Second Critic: Boot & Saddle

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There are few things that get a young man like me as excited as loud rock-and-roll and fine booze—especially in combination. Fortunately, South Broad Street’s Boot & Saddle nails that exacta. Reopened after nearly 20 years of dormancy by the folks behind overnight success Union Transfer, B&S hosts live shows that are loud but also pristinely clear, an unusual quality in a rock club of this size. (Boot & Saddle holds 150 in the performance area, which is sectioned off from the always-crowded bar.) On the downside, there’s virtually no seating, which after a few of the strong cocktails or high-ABV beers might get a bit old. But in a town lacking well-equipped small music venues where you can see up-and-coming acts that aren’t all over the radio, Boot & Saddle is a godsend.


Grade: A-

Where We’re Eating: Boot and Saddle

boot and saddle square“Back in the saddle again” is more than just an Aerosmith lyric. It’s what looks to become a familiar refrain as I return time and again to Boot & Saddle, the bar from Avram Hornik and Sean Agnew (Morgan’s Pier, Union Transfer) that restores the country-western joint that closed more than 15 years ago into something altogether new that feels like it hasn’t changed in decades. The western paintings remain from the old Boot & Saddle, as do the stamped-tin walls and ceilings. What is new is a bar illuminated by an I-beam lassoed in thick rope, with six Edison-style bulbs hanging down. And then there’s the 150-person-capacity live-music venue behind a soundproof door at the back of the dining area. Even the much-cooler-than-me waitress admitted needing to Google most of the bands, but the vibe is undeniable. During a British punk band’s set, the bar area’s music matched the live band’s energy; on a quiet Tuesday night, the same bar became a welcoming oasis. The beer list is well-curated, with some hard-to-find American craft brews, and while the cocktail lineup was less successful, you should probably just be drinking whiskey here anyway. Plus, George Sabatino has designed the short and vegetarian-friendly menu with all options coming in under $15. So however the night finds you, this Saddle won’t chafe.

Boot & Saddle [Foobooz]

First appeared in the December, 2013 issue of Philadelphia magazine.


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