Flyers’ Claude Giroux Buys Unit at 10 Rittenhouse

Photo by Laura Kicey.

Photo by Laura Kicey.

Does Claude Giroux care that he’ll be close to Cliff Lee and Jonathan Papelbon, who live at 1706, now that he bought a penthouse unit at 10 Rittenhouse? Do the Phillies and the Flyers guys hang out? (In fact, does anyone hang out with Jonathan Papelbon?)

Well, no matter. He has plenty of other bigwigs to hang with at 10 Rittenhouse, as the Philadelphia Business Journal’s Natalie Kostelni — the Brenda Starr of real estate reporting — revealed today. Last year, Property’s Shannon Rooney and Laura Kicey took a look at the penthouses in progress, and some of these photos are those being used to market the 29th-floor units, one of which Giroux bought for $2.2 million or thereabouts. Thus, we can assume the photos below represent the way Claude Giroux will now live:

Read more »

Midday Headlines: Rittenhouse Club Horror Story

home for sale

New projects in and around the city are thriving (even if approvals can be cumbersome), but not all developments are created equal. Case in point: the Rittenhouse Club condo apartments in Norristown.

In an an article written for the Inquirer, Carolyn Davis tells the home buyer horror story that unfolded with a Norristown condo complex at its center.

The 26-unit project by developer R. Bruce Fazio cropped up with issues from the start. And not just cliché, annoying-leaky-pipes type of issues. No, more like scary naked wiring and wooden fire-escape staircase (what?!) issues. And it doesn’t stop there:

Read more »

Morning Headlines: Plans to Revitalize Metropolitan Opera on N. Broad

Curbed Philly has the scoop on some eyebrow-raising developments at the old Metropolitan Opera House at North Broad and Poplar.

Eric Blumenfeld’s company (yes, that Eric Blumenfeld), EB Realty Management, co-owns the property along with the Holy Ghost Headquarters Church. EB’s Commercial Development Manager Chris Cordaro tells Curbed they are currently negotiating to turn the lower level of the mouldering opera house into a giant catering space.

“We’re in discussions now about the size,” said Cordaro when contacted by phone. Although nothing is solid quite yet, he noted that it could be up to 20,000 square feet in size.

Curbed says there are also plans for a bakery, restaurant and a separate banquet area in the works. Head over there to gaze upon the renderings from Stokes Architecture.

Could a huge catering facility be coming for the Met? [Curbed Philly]

More news this way…

Read more »

City Finally Dismantles Boarded Up Frankford Home

frankford home fire 2013

4712 Worth Street (center)
Photo credit: Google Street View.

It’s not even city-owned blight, which begs the question…if it had it been, how much longer would it have taken? After almost a year of neighborhood meeting complaints and 311 calls to the city, the boarded up charred remains of this Frankford home are finally being removed. And at a heavier penny than usual, too.

John Loftus of the Northeast Times reports that after 4712 Worth Street burned down last July, the city stamped it with the ever ubiquitous “imminently dangerous” label and barred its entry. (Although a neighbor says possums and raccoons still managed to settle in.)

Read more »

Morning Headlines: Main Line Takes Steps Toward Revitalization

150 monument road bala cynwyd screenshot

Photo credit: Google Street View

A 207-unit apartment has been proposed for 150 Monument Road in Bala Cynwyd, a project to be presented before the Lower Merion Township Planning Commission this Monday.

The Main Line Times’ Cheryl Allison says the planned six-story building would be situated on a seven-acre plot in Bala Cynwyd that currently hosts another six-story building used for office space. Allison also reports the project includes a central courtyard with pool deck, commercial/restaurant space (3,700 square feet), and a four-story parking garage, which is to have 673 parking spaces, 207 of which would be for apartment tenants.

The proposed development is one of many (some of which are already in progress), and the result of revitalization goals for the City Avenue commercial district:
Read more »

The Top 5 Things Smart Philly Residents Care About [UPDATED]

UPDATE: The below has been clarified to reflect the fact that PlanPhilly was concerned only with issues around the built and natural environments, as they wrote in their post. Another clarification: My original title for this post was “Top 5 Things Planning Nerds Care About,” but I chose to make it more positive. Readers of PlanPhilly, in my experience, are all very bright. Who else would read devotedly about planning and zoning?

In order to create a more perfect Philadelphia as we move toward an election year, PennPraxis and PlanPhilly presented PlanPhilly’s readers with a list of what they described as the “most important issues facing Philadelphia’s built and natural environments” and asked their readers to answer one important question: “Which three of these issues do you feel are the most important for Philadelphia’s future?”

“We’ll use this information to help shape research and civic engagement by PennPraxis staff and reporting by PlanPhilly journalists,” writes Evan Croen, PlanPhilly’s website administrator and A Person Who Moved Here From Brooklyn.

The survey results showed that the top 5 issues are:

Read more »

Morning Headlines: SugarHouse Begins $164M Expansion

SugarHouse photo courtesy sameold210 via Flickr.

SugarHouse photo courtesy sameold210 via Flickr.

You may not remember it now, but when SugarHouse opened in 2010, the casino was not quite finished. Yes, the facility was built, but there were further plans for expansion. After years of legal battles and delays, executives (and local pols) broke ground yesterday. The Inquirer’s Harold Brubaker has all the details.

The expansion, expected to open next year, will more than double the size of SugarHouse, to 260,000 square feet from 108,000 square feet, not including a 600,000-square-foot, seven-story parking garage that will give poker players, in particular, quick access to the tables.

Read more »

Postgreen Offers Peek At Its Next Project

postrgreen-trenton-ave

Trenton Avenue, which begins in the triangle where Fishtown, East Kensington and Port Richmond overlap, is a broad thoroughfare that once was a bustling industrial corridor. Now, save for one day a year, it’s mostly a quiet residential street.

Chad Luderman, CEO of Postgreen Homes, believes this transformation was a mistake. Not that he wants to bring back industry, but rather, it’s that a street this wide makes for a natural commercial corridor. (It certainly makes a great setting for an arts festival and kinetic sculpture race.)

It may be too late to add commerce to the rest of the street, but Luderman’s going to at least try to salvage a little stretch of it.

Read more »

Morning Headlines: Experts Consider Atlantic City’s Fate

Photo courtesy  Wikimedia Commons.

Photo courtesy Wikimedia Commons.

The Inquirer has a lengthy report this morning speculating on Atlantic City’s fate come September, when as many as four Boardwalk properties may be vacant. Suzette Parmley talks to a variety of authorities and rubberneckers, and even nabs a quote from Carl Dranoff while he’s at dinner.

With the Atlantic Club having closed in January, Trump Plaza closing in September and Revel and Showboat in dire straits, Mayor Don Guardian tells Parmley that the city is considering using the old casinos for other purposes. Changes will need the go-ahead from the Casino Reinvestment Development Authority.

What would the other purposes be? Parmley found a few people with suggestions. One possible tenant would be Richard Stockton College, which has expressed interest in opening a campus in Atlantic City:

The changing landscape in A.C. makes it more important than ever to diversify the economic base in Atlantic City, as well as provide four-year degree and higher educational opportunities for the many employees being displaced,” Stockton president Herman Saatkamp said in a statement Wednesday. “A college campus complete with housing and surrounding businesses would be a significant asset to these needs.

Read more »

Morning Headlines: Flagship Wawa Closes; Locals Mourn

AP-first-wawa-940x540
Okay, that’s not true. Though the Greater Philadelphia area is taking this harder than James Garner’s death (RIP, Rockford), I doubt there’ll be a candlelight vigil — but note my use of the word “doubt,” because the region’s love for Wawa is (some would say irrationally) fierce.

deco daily times coverIt’s the front page of the Delaware County Daily Times, headline blaring: “1…and Done” and “End of the line for historic Wawa store.” To which I reply: WHERE WAS THE PRESERVATION ALLIANCE ON THIS? Working on the Boyd and the Blue Horizon? Priorities, people!

Barbara Ormsby, reporting for the Delco Daily Times, strikes a wistful note: “The Wawa on MacDade Boulevard and Swarthmore Avenue — the company’s very first convenience store that opened 50 years ago — will soon be gone, but won’t be forgotten.”

Read more »

« Older Posts