Morning Headlines: Conversion Plans for Home of Oscar Hammerstein II on Pause

Zoning board schedules to continue hearing in March.

Left: Oscar Hammerstein II. Photo via Wikimedia Commons. Right: Highland Farm. Photo via Highland Farm B&B website

Left: Oscar Hammerstein II. Photo via Wikimedia Commons.
Right: Highland Farm. Photo via Highland Farm B&B website

According to the Inquirer’s Chris Palmer, Will Hammerstein remains undeterred despite last night’s zoning board hearing that did little to advance his plans to convert his grandfather’s Doylestown home into a 400-seat museum and theater.

In case you missed it, last week we wrote about how Hammerstein–grandson of Oscar Hammerstein II, the legendary songwriter known for penning songs in The Sound of Music and Oklahoma!–seemed headed for NIMBY waters after area residents (and three township supervisors) professed opposition to his proposal.

Palmer reports that Hammerstein needs several zoning variances approved in order to get the project going, something which Monday’s zoning board meeting pushed to consider two months from now:

After three hours of testimony Monday night, a number of people were still slated to speak, so the board continued proceedings until March.

Vote delayed on theater plan for former Hammerstein property [Inquirer]

In other news…
Zoning issues to be discussed at Frankford NAC meeting [Northeast Times]
What Does Living ‘Close’ to Transit Really Mean? [City Lab]
Philadelphia’s New Housing Boom – How Far Will It Go? [Public Record]
LISC report shows neighborhood investments working [PlanPhilly]
Roxborough property owner faces conservatorship battle over once-neglected pizza shop [NewsWorks]
Cause of deadly silo collapse may not be known until summer [Courier Times]
Status report on Granite Run Mall property pushed back [Daily Times]

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