Morning Headlines: Karen Dougherty Buchholz Is Female!

She stays fit with hot yoga!

The Inquirer reported yesterday on Karen Dougherty Buchholz, Comcast’s Senior Vice President of Administration and the organizational leader behind the CITC project, the planned skyscraper designed by London-based starchitect Norman Foster. The Inquirer dove deep into Buchholz’s career and her plans for the project:

A stylish dresser who stays fit with hot yoga, Buchholz, 47, is married to attorney Carl Buchholz, who is with DLA Piper in Philadelphia. They … have two children, Alex and Julia, plus seven pets – two dogs, three cats, and two chickens – in the northern suburbs.

Karen Buchholz’s recent reading includes fiction, The Goldfinch by Donna Tartt, and nonfiction, The Widow Clicquot by Tilar J. Mazzeo.


In the news stories leading up to the convention in the late 1990s, reporters noted that Buchholz was so obsessively well-organized that the young mother set the breakfast table for her young children before she went to bed.

Comcast CEO Brian Roberts' fitness interests and nightstand reading currently eludes me, but I'm guessing that'll be in the Inquirer's next piece about the CITC. And Roberts has some penetrating insight into one of his top execs:

"One of the things that makes Karen the perfect lead for this is that she is super-organized and she's a nice person and works well with teams."

That is, indeed, the best kind of female employee: the kind who doesn't let her PMS irritability get in the way.

Planning the new Comcast tower, from large to small [Inquirer] Meanwhile, in news elsewhere...

Three new towers proposed for Logan Square in Center City [Philadelphia Business Journal]

What a Rush: Benjamin Rush State Park gets its grand opening [Northeast Times]

Selling gentrification to neighbors of the old West Philadelphia High School building [NewsWorks]

New owner, new chance for preservation of Ardmore's First Baptist Church [Main Line Times]

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  • justthetruth

    Certainly sounds sexist, but just to be sure – what do the wives (employed or non-employed) of Philadelphia’ most highly paid male corporate executives think? (I’m going out on a limb here, but I’m guessing more of them are not employed). After all, they probably enjoy the practical application of all that money more than the husbands do (plus in general they’ll live longer…..) So let’s hear from ‘em.