Do A.C.: Atlantic City Takes 15,000 Lb. Pop-Up Casino Resort on the Road

Not enough people going to Atlantic City? Then the Atlantic City Alliance will bring AC to the people. The  ”Live From AC” roadshow starts this weekend in Philly with a pop-up casino resort (15,000 lbs. and two stories) at the waterfront that includes “key AC experiences” all framed by the “DO AC” advertising campaign.

The Alliance is a nonprofit that markets the city to tourists, which  has been an uphill battle in recent months. So the organization has partnered with BMF, a company that helps build brands with experiential marketing of this kind. This roadshow will also go to Baltimore and NYC.

In a statement, Atlantic City Alliance President Liza Cartmell said the goal of the roadshow is to  ”introduce AC to people in a new way, create a social media buzz and represent all 12 casinos in key markets.” She said it’s an opportunity to engage “our target audience of fun seekers.” (Are there fun seekers in Philly? If so, where do they pass the time? Not on SEPTA, that’s for sure.)


pop-up casino resort rendering

Rendering of the pop-up casino resort that will be at Penn’s Landing this weekend.


So here’s what’s going on at the Great Plaza at Penn’s Landing this weekend, noon to 10pm each day. Aside from performers DJ Nigel Richards and Rod Stewart, there are these options:

  • Do Chill – Relax and recharge your body with a free five-minute AC spa massage
  • Do Views – Experience the views, luxury and fun offered by Atlantic City’s casino hotels while recharging your electronic devices at one of the recharging stations
  • Do Chance – Spin the wheel and try your luck for an AC prize
  • Do Memories – Have your picture taken in front of a variety of iconic AC backgrounds to automatically post and share using #LiveFromAC
  • Do Thrills – Get a taste of AC nightlife with DJ Nigel Richards internationally-recognized for his unique music style and contributions to the dance music industry
  • Do Savor – Play the restaurant/hotel matching game to win AC prizes
  • Interior design features: TVs, furniture, boardwalk flooring, wood, fabric and vinyl walls, photo booth, DJ booth, gaming table, bar
  • Architects, designers: 18 people between the architects, designers, builders and engineers
  • It’ll be from noon to 10 p.m. each day. It’ll be interesting to see how and if this translates in terms of getting visitors to the shore.

    Do A.C. official site

  • nicksaenz1

    Thinking we’re in the land of the free was your first mistake.

  • aub32

    Some people just don’t get it. This goes beyond just saying a word. That word represents an ignorant mindset and outlook that has no place in “the land of the free”. Now personally I do not think Riley is a racist, however that kind of behavior cannot be tolerated by a public figure, especially in a league that is most made up by people who would take offense to that term. The NFL is a billion dollar industry. They cannot for one second allow anyone to think they permit their players to feel this way.

  • Andy124

    It doesn’t matter how much it is relative to many Americans. It matters how much it is relative to him. I doubt he’s going to be unable to pay his power bill decause of it, but it’s stiff enough to hurt. Sounds just about right to me.

    The “n” word isn’t the only word left you can’t say either. Slurs against gays and other minorities are consistently met with outrage as well. I would guess that it’s to a lesser degree, but I wouldn’t want to argue the point one way or the other.

    Where we completely agree is that the call for illiegal hits or outright release represent an overreaction. But come on, that’s par for course. There’s a WHOLE LOT of people on the internet. So even if only a small percentage of them are silly, that’s a WHOLE LOT of silly.

  • illadelphia21

    I love how some people come on this site (and some I’ve never ever seen comment before) and try and minimize the word in question or Coops actions involving that word. It’s as utterly ridiculous, and just as ridiculous as those who are calling for him to be cut, on top of the punishment already handed down. Whether it be a lack of understanding, intelligence, or either a concerted effort to push some BS agenda…both are extreme ends of the spectrum and extremely narrow minded.

  • poetx99

    lol.

  • bob

    To add to the Vick thing – who better to preach about forgiveness and moving on from the mistakes of your past than he who has received so much forgiveness himself.

  • Andy

    I think Vick handled this situation admirably. That said, Cooper didn’t utter a slur that is racist against Foles’ race, so while Foles was probably as offended by it as most of us were, Cooper didn’t have any reason to ask Foles for forgiveness and Foles didn’t have any real reason to make a statement. I think Vick will be the starter in Week 1, but his response to this incident is totally unrelated to that outcome.

  • aub32

    For anyone pointing out that Foles was not asked to deliver a statement on behalf of the team because he is white; think of the Steelers. Do you think that had this happened there that Leftwhich would be placed in front of the media? It’s Big Ben’s team, and he would be in charge of diffusing the situation. In fact there might be more of a call to hear from him so that he can express that the other white players in the locker room detest such behavior as much as anyone.

    • theycallmerob

      C’mon aub, there’s no comparison between the qb situations on those teams. Big Ben has been there leader for years. Granted, I wouldn’t be surprised if Polamalu or someone said something too.

      Vick has always been respected. And he also knows a thing or two about doing something dumb, and having to come back into a locker room afterwards.

      I just can’t believe this incident proves anything more than what we already knew about Vick’s leadership qualities. It certainly doesn’t determine the position battle.

      • aub32

        First off Polamalu isn’t black. So you may get some flack there if that’s what you were implying. Second, I think Vick’s leadership was very much in question this offseason. I have seen many posts by fans disputing Vick had the ability to lead this team, citing how Foles was the better leader. I do agree with you that this does not in any way decide who the QB is going forward; I will not dismiss this casually as “O he’s black so he made a statement”. I do think this was a test for Vick to show he can be the face and spokesperson of this team, and he passed with flying colors. I get fed up with some of the hypocrites here that talk about intangibles, but when the guy they are not backing shows them, they casually dismiss him.

        • theycallmerob

          I commented on the leadership thing below, but I will never doubt Vick in that category. He commands respect like few players in this league.

        • #7

          Go ahead aub32!!

    • cliff henny

      sure Tomlin would have taken lead.

  • Weapon Y

    I didn’t have much faith in the Eagles special teams last year, so it might be wise for Chip to continue his high rate of 2-point conversion attempts.

  • jabostick

    There’s a lot of serious debate going on here but I think we’re missing a more important issue: I made the mailbag!

    • theycallmerob

      I didn’t know if that was you or your cousin “jmbo”. We all seem to be meeting our internet dopplegangers today.

      • jabostick

        Ha, yeah its me. My screen name here matches my email but I thought I should make a Twitter handle that’s less ‘searchable’ (by future employers).

  • Token

    LeSean McCoy really needs to grow up someday. That kid just can never keep his mouth shut. Before he speaks he should remember his history with women that puts him in a awful light. Supremely talented, but probably one of the bigger A-holes on a team that is bursting at the seams with them.

  • BBrophy723

    You know, you’d think McCoy would have a little more grace considering his twitter rants. He’s definitely said things he wishes he could take back. That being said, I think McCoy’s answer here is honest and probably accurate about how a lot of people feel in the locker room.

    • @PhilthyBird215

      You sound like what Cooper said is equal to what ever McCoy uttered out on twitter.

      granted MaCoy did say some things that would make people pause. But, nothing as hateful, and as demeaning as what Cooper said. With that said, people in the media are definitely Instigating the issue even further then where it should be. I read articles calling for Coopers dismissal. like Matt lambardo >> http://www.rantsports.com/nfl/2013/08/01/chip-kelly-fears-locker-room-division-in-wake-of-riley-cooper-saga/ and Sal Palantonio instigating, and speaking on morning shows about what he thinks rather then reporting what is going on.

  • therealpistolp

    Houston, we officially have a problem…

    • B-West

      No doubt. I’m not sure time can heal this one, because it exposed Cooper for having these thoughts in him. Plenty of people get some alcohol flowing and get riled up and do something regrettable. They don’t all start dropping N-bombs. Its also pretty hard to believe that this is the first time he ever used the word.

      His teammates are correct to be suspicious of what Cooper is really all about.

      • backliner

        I wonder if there is anyone on the Eagles who hasn’t used that word

  • Shark

    I like Riley, sad to see that video (I actually saw it a few months ago, soon after the concert was in Philly). But this just seems to get way overblown and way too much national attention.

    • Token

      Media loves this kind of stuff. It makes their job easier.

  • #7

    McCoy has every right to feel like this. Just don’t let this affect WINNING

  • G_WallyHunter

    3rd paragraph: Should be “move past it” not “move past him”

    • Brian

      Freudian slip?

  • G_WallyHunter

    I agree that Vick is the leader of the team, I never said that he should have been the one to speak just because of his race, he was the one to speak because he’s been the leader for over 2 years… All I was saying is it’s also (conveniently) more appropriate for him to speak on the matter

  • G_WallyHunter

    Agreed here, conveniently, given Mike’s past and ethnicity, it was appropriate. Also, he is the leader, so he stepped up. It’s not simply because he was black… It helped but like you said it’s because he is the leader of the team, black or white, and he has dealt with much dumber things in the past..

  • Andy124

    McCoy talks about putting the team first, but wouldn’t it be better for the team if he expressed himself to Cooper and the rest of the team privately and toed the company line to the media?

    His statement that people show who they really are when they think that nobody is watching shows a lack of understanding that a person may reach for the nastiest, most hurtful thing they can think to say when they lose their temper, which, considering his recent history, you’d think he’d have a little more empathy for.
    At the same time, he’s only 25, and not the most mature 25 year old at that. I don’t expect him to know the perfect thing to say every time and I’m certainly not going to get bent out of shape when he errs on the side of too much honesty.

  • morgan c

    I mean, I can’t judge the guy for feeling the way he does. I’m not black. And I can only begin to understand how hearing that from a teammate, if I were black, would feel. But saying that no matter what happens in the future he will never be friends with him again? I mean, it seems a bit extreme. And as people have pointed out, McCoy himself has had issues saying things he wished he could take back. Not to this level, not at all, but still. The espn article has more McCoy quotes where he says he will never talk to him off the field ever again. I think that is a different level beyond being really pissed off and hurt. I don’t see how one comment, no matter how bad, can define who you are as a person. Hopefully McCoy and others will come around, so long as Cooper is truly contrite (which he appears to be), but it’s their prerogative not to do so I guess.

  • Dutch

    What is alarming to me is that some seem to think this is a racial divide, when in fact from my perspective and many others it’s a “Good vs Bad and right and wrong divide. The Eagles have a devise threat in their sanctuary

  • cliff henny

    angry or not, he said that with some serious conviction. the dude meant every word. and certainly wasnt the first time. was no looking around, let me see who’s standing here, and i’ll let the n fly. he said that from his toes

  • kushtonslater

    Good for Lesean McCoy, not letting a racist in his locker room get away with that bullshit…People that dumb don’t really change.

  • kushtonslater

    Exactly. I couldn’t have said it any better myself.

  • Mark Sitko

    Careful McCoy – you left a woman on the New Jersey turnpike this off-season…that is some cold blooded shit right there…you live in a thin paned glass house…

  • Phils Goodman

    Even if you don’t believe Cooper is contrite, what benefit does it serve, as a teammate, to say so in public?

  • Phils Goodman

    I don’t admire McCoy’s honesty here. As much as fans crave this kind of insight, there is a good reason that teams and players fear honesty and a policy with the media.

  • Pennguino

    Why did he use that word?

    Did he use it because he is a closet racist? A guy that bleeds, sweats and cries with his team mates that are not just black and white. Does he see his team mates as black men first or as team mates first?

    Did he use the word because it was the most powerful word as viewed by our society to be hurtful and hateful that he could express in his drunken anger?

  • Scott J610

    You just know there’s going to be a blow up at Cooper at some point this season. Probably after a few loses. This team has the potential to implode.

  • nicksaenz1

    Overestimating the significance is just as silly. This is a leaderless team, therefore, he’s the de facto guy to speak on it. Moreover, the white guy saying “we forgave him”, as stated on the board already, holds very little weight. Bob, above, made another great point, who better to speak of forgiving than the man who has been the beneficiary of so much forgiveness? Also, we haven’t had this situation happen in any other clubhouse (and I’d like to think that this would be quite the deterrent for it happening again), and while it’s easy to assume a Rodgers/Brady/Manning type would be the person to speak to the media, we just can’t assume that because of the nature of the remarks made. Your best point is that Cooper definitely didn’t do Foles any favors . I’ll admit, it appears that Vick has a little edge in the competition right now, but let’s not blow this out of proportion.

  • #7

    TRUTH. You don’t have to be black to address these type of issues as the LEADER of the football team.

  • Andy124

    Agreed on all points.

  • Chris

    great point

  • G_WallyHunter

    but it’s just much more appropriate… but I agree, leaving everything else constant, if Foles was black and Vick was white, I would still think Vick would be the one speaking. He’s more of a leader of the team, regardless of his race. That’s funny I mention that, then look at your picture, hilarious

  • nicksaenz1

    You’re right, you don’t HAVE to be. It’s just not going to hold that much weight when Tom Brady says that we forgave him when the player making the slur didn’t offend the race of the man doing the forgiving.

  • #7

    Why would it be stupid if he is the leader of the team?

  • #7

    :)

  • #7

    No offense, I get what you’re saying, but I really don’t think it’s more appropriate. So since Hernandez is Hispanic, Brady is white, Brady shouldn’t speak on it because of color? A leader is a leader in my book, no matter the color

  • G_WallyHunter

    I didn’t mean stupid, I mean out of place and less appropriate… You’re telling me, if Foles came out and did what vick did, while Vick sat back and stayed silent, that the national media wouldn’t have a circus with it?

  • nicksaenz1

    I never said that you did say that. Could be construed that you were leading into it but I didn’t do that either. They’re separate issues. In a tight race, which, as of now, still appears to be, it might matter, because, as noted, it hurts Foles because he can’t be the guy to speak on it. I also never claimed you were overestimating, just that one shouldn’t overestimate or read that far into it. That’s all.

  • nicksaenz1

    Hernandez didn’t say a racial slur. He killed a man. Apples and oranges.

  • G_WallyHunter

    What nicksaenz said…. all I’m saying lol.. I understand Foles or Vick can be the leader here, but it’s just much more appropriate, given the circumstances, that Vick steps forward and speaks on the issue. If they were at a Jay-Z concert, and BG was caught saying “I’ll fight every cracker here, every one of them”, then yes, it is more appropriate for Foles to be speaking… lol bad analogy but u see

  • #7

    You know what I mean man geez.

  • nicksaenz1

    I don’t. Because they’re not related.

  • theycallmerob

    7, I get your opinion, but that is not at all the same thing. Nothing Hernandez did had anything to do with racism. It is absolutely a huge deal, for many people, that it was Vick (not Foles) who said that. I’m not taking away anything from Vick’s leadership, but it is a bit naive to say that it would be no different coming from Foles’ mouth.

    You don’t see Joe Biden leading the outrage train for Trayvon.

  • #7

    That why we have opinions I guess. I could care less what color my “leader” is. It really looks like Foles took the backseat on this, and I get that too.

  • nicksaenz1

    You’re either missing the point or being willfully dismissive of the point. Either way, Go Birds.

  • #7

    G_Wally..the media makes everything a circus. That is unavoidable unfortunately. Many ways to answer that question

  • #7

    Alright cool

  • #7

    Just using that as an example. People on here are saying that Vick spoke on this because he was black and that its was appropriate, which I understand, and I say that he spoke on this because he is the leader, Period. Brady spoke on Hernandez as the leader, period, regardless of race. I just used that part as an example and I know that the cases are totally different

  • #7

    For good reason. Nick does not seem to be that kind of leader and really he has not accomplished enough to have that spot anyway

  • theycallmebob

    wait no more. I’m here.

  • theycallmerob

    I will never doubt Vick’s leadership. I know people’s opinions on him are varied, but speaking strictly as Vick the Man (not Vick the Player), he has done absolutely everything right since his release. He lost a lot, and has rebuilt. There is no better role model for redemption, and I believe he should absolutely speak to the rookies at their invitational every single year.

    BUT…I cannot get onboard with the notion that because he spoke on this topic, he somehow has the leg up in the QB race. Say, hypothetically, Foles wins and is starting- Coach Kelly will never tolerate some players not buying into his decision. Reid was almost too much of a player’s coach; we haven’t had a cohesive locker room since McNabb vs. TO

  • theycallmerob

    I do agree with that. However, not all leaders are build the same; Foles doesn’t seem to be a passionate rah-rah guy. Stylistically, Flacco is the same way. Granted, Ray and Ed were there forever, but even now he is the unspoken face of the franchise. Suggs and Rice are the voices. To say Nick is silent is not to say he lacks leadership.

  • #7

    I don’t recall saying that Vick had the leg up because of this. I just said that this proves that he is the leader of this team and I think the players respond to him.

  • aub32

    dun dun dun

  • theycallmerob

    I always knew my father was sleeping around with the maid…..

  • theycallmerob

    my apologies if you took that personally, I didn’t direct it at you so much as some other folks on this and the past threads. I agree with your points on this matter. At the end of the day, Vick can say whatever he wants, but I’m sure there are guys on this team (and plenty of others) who will forever hold him in a different light. And that’s the real justice- once racism is out of the bag, it can’t be put back in. Riley will have to own this the rest of his career and life. I agree 100% with what Kelly told him re: speaking to the media.

  • #7

    Vick is not a “rah-rah” guy either. Well let’s just say that Vick is def not a Dawkins, Ray Lewis type of leader. We’re making guesstimations on what kind of leader Foles is at this point. Maybe I’m crazy for thinking that Foles could have spoken on this since he’s trying to be the starter and trying to win the respect of the lockeroom

  • http://abigbuttandasmile.com/ A Big Butt and a Smile

    Flacco wasn’t the leader of that team. Ray was. When Reed was questioning the coach all hell was about to break lose Ray was one of the ones who had to help quell the budding rebellion. That was RAY’S team. All day. Flacco just threw the football.

  • #7

    Didn’t feel that way at all bro. I like your posts

  • http://abigbuttandasmile.com/ A Big Butt and a Smile

    Foles missed out on a opp here. Says a lot.

  • theycallmerob

    I agree; I’m talking about the future now that they’re gone. I meant to say “is not” (I just edited it)

  • theycallmerob

    I’ve helped lead some of those “rallies”, as recently as last week:

    http://www.baltimoresun.com/news/maryland/baltimore-city/north-baltimore/bs-md-rodricks-0725-20130724,0,5871260.column

    which is exactly why I’m saying that the message would not be received the same. There are many times I come across this daily. Whether it is not a big deal for you and I does not mean it is overlooked by others.

  • mike

    Shutup man

  • aub32

    He said he forgave the guy, but this just came out yesterday. Is he not allowed time to get over something that offended him coming from someone he thought was a friend?

  • therealpistolp

    Why is McCoy wrong for voicing his concerns?? The person in the wrong is cooper for opening up the flood gates..

  • #7

    Damn bruh he has the right to be honest lol

  • theycallmerob

    care to elaborate on “bursting at the seams”? his comments were honest. and if we can’t bring honesty into this dialogue, than what’s the point??

  • Token

    Well, like Vick, he should know not to be one to jump to damning others when he himself has been in a similar scenario. But, McCoy is a pro bowler sooooooo…..

  • theycallmerob

    Also, just for fun….it seems many liked Foles today! http://www.bleedinggreennation.com/2013/8/1/4578756/eagles-training-camp-open-thread-8-1-13

    Also, reading some of the tweets further up, you can gauge some of the player reactions to what Coop said.

  • aub32

    So someone who has done anything wrong doesn’t have the right to feel wronged. Dude come off it. You’re embarassing yourself at this point.

  • Token

    In this case, absolutely. All this does is continue to feed a bad situation. Its like a little kid trying to stoke the fire.

  • Phils Goodman

    It’s not a question of being honest, it’s a question of being smart.

  • aub32

    A teammate and friend angrily blurted out a racial slur that offended him. Then he was asked about how he felt about it. You’re right though, that’s none of his business.

  • EaglePete

    McCoys own business has zero to do with his reaction to this situation. I get the glass houses thing, but it doesnt always apply esp in this case.

  • Token

    You dont know much about LeSean McCoy apparently.

    But this is a fan base who with open arms loves a guy who committed heinous acts on living beings. So I guess I should expect these types of thinkers around here when it comes to off field topics.

  • Phils Goodman

    What if those feelings are best kept private for the sake of the team? Your personal access (via media) to a player’s feelings should not be the holy grail here. Vick showed a lot more discretion with his comments (in the interests of the team), even if it’s possible that he was a lot less honest.

  • knighn

    Grr, Vick! The guy is supremely talented. I just wish he could:
    - Stay a little more healthy
    - Make decisions a little more quickly (run or pass… don’t just stand there behind the line of scrimmage waiting to be hit)
    - Turn the ball over a lot less
    - Be a little more accurate

    After more than a decade in the league, I just don’t think he’s going to put it all together. In all honestly: at this rate I’m fairly certain he’ll either be finishing his NFL career or finished with his NFL career by 2015. That’s why I’d rather see Foles or Barkely. We know what we have with Vick and it’s not good enough. We don’t know what the ceiling is for Foles or Barkley. But man… if Vick could just get it a little more together and stay a little more healthy…

  • Token

    This thought that McCoy and teammates dont call each other “nigga” is laughable. But now hes outraged. Context doesnt matter. If someone is really harmed by a word it shouldnt matter in what context its in. All of this false hurt feelings is just sad.

    Do you think McCoy has never said anything he regrets? He should know what its like.

    Its just crazy we still live in a world that is so dumbed down that people get so up in arms about a word like nigger. It blows my mind. We must evolve past trivial things like this someday.

  • #7

    Now how do you get away with saying that word? If it was me that said that on here, I would have been banned immediately lol

  • theycallmerob

    yes, let us all move past the history of racism because you are ready to. for such an “evolved” life form, you have little empathy.

  • Dutch

    So you’re not sure of the context Cooper said what he did or you don’t care? There’s simply no way to confuse the two points if you saw the video. The people in the group with Cooper recognized instantly and reacted. They knew his intent when the words rolled off his lips the malice intent.

    The players eventually will move beyond this given a chance, but don’t play the Black Athletes or the White athletes who are equally offended for a fool. They understand the context very well and, flatly there’s no room for that disposition in a profession workplace.

  • G_WallyHunter

    How does context not matter? are you nuts?
    Context is ALL that matters, in this case

  • theycallmerob

    there are plenty of other blogs where you can sit on your high horse.

  • EaglePete

    I thought that Vick coming forward to accept his apology was an interesting dynamic. Vick coming from a place where he had peoples help and support and forgiveness. Hes just passing along forgiveness, I see nothing wrong with that. This idea that only certain people have a place to react a certain way based on their own past demons is just not valid, there is plenty of gray area and we all live in it. Things are rarely determined in all or nothing scenarios.

  • Dutch

    I would think he’s minding his own business. McCoy is employed by the same team that employes Cooper. Cooper’s antics just made the work place hostile. What kind of employer allows an infected racial environment? There are laws in place specifically to eradicate such an atmosphere.

    I don’t see how that’s casually overlooked by anyone that respects participating in a civilized society.

  • Dutch

    Who could possibly conceive that the locker room or any work place would not be tense after something like this?

    If you have a black associate, friend or neighbor and spent any time socializing with them how is it you can’t identify with them being offended from this incident? Or, you don’t have much consideration and respect for their humanity that the thought of them being offended doesn’t register.

    Don’t get me wrong, it’s ok if you don’t know any one across racial lines you respect and socialize with that close.

  • Dutch

    I Cooper worked with me he would be fired. We just aren’t having that kind of reputation cast over the firm by low level employees. It matter who answers your phone, and who greets your customers.

    This clown had just gotten down from the stage after being introduced as a representative of the Phila Eagles. Mind you in their home stadium which by chance is publicly owned.

    When I first started drinking, my Dad told me, that a Drunk tongue speaks from the Heart.

  • therealpistolp

    Ur comparing some babymoma drama to a racial slur… Did u really think that none of his black teammates that consider him friend would look at him differently?? It’s not on everybody else to sweep it under the rug,, it’s on him..

  • Dutch

    Like Paula Deem, she cried a river once she realized the financial fall out from her anti social behavior and choice chatter. Cooper could also see a similar undoing of his financial security for the same thing. That’s worthy of being or having the appearance of being contrite.

    I just can’t get over he looked exactly like the “Git R Done Guy” cut off lumberjack to match…….

  • http://abigbuttandasmile.com/ A Big Butt and a Smile

    I’m not arguing whether Cooper should be fired. For the record I think he should simply b/c you can’t insult 3/4 of the work place AND be a no nothing AND cause massive national negative media attention and still have your job.

    I’m saying Since Shady has done things I also think he should be fired (or at least fined) for – as a woman – if Shady went up and said “Hey Cooper shouldn’t be allowed to play” then some of the comments about Shady being a hypocrite or him applying a double standard to another’s indiscretion would hold some weight. Right now they hold no weight at all.

  • Dutch

    you’re an amazing character…….. Remember the Titans………Classic!

  • Phils Goodman

    Exactly. What IS the point? How does opening up to the media help the team in any way? Belichick does it as little as possible. Coughlin does it as little as possible. Reid did it as little as possible.

  • Phils Goodman

    It’s not a question of rights, it’s a matter of discretion. When it comes to openness with the media do you really think “honesty is the best policy”? Is that the operating procedure of smart teams in the NFL?

  • theycallmerob

    So if he doesn’t say anything, the problem disappears? There is a grantland article out today about just how much more than usual Belichick and the Pats HAVE opened up re: Hernandez. This isn’t a football issue, but a societal one played out in a camera filled locker room. should Kluwe and Ayenbedajo stayed quiet on gay rights?

  • Phils Goodman

    >So if je doesn’t say anything, the problem disappears?

    No. When did I suggest that it did? I am saying that it’s a problem that’s best hashed out behind closed doors. That’s how strong locker rooms handle problems. I can’t think of it ever being good for a team when locker room grievances go public.

    >This isn’t a football issue, but a societal one played out in a camera filled locker room.

    McCoy is commenting on a locker room issue (possible deterioration of his relationship with another player), not a societal issue.

    >should Kluwe and Ayenbedajo stayed quiet on gay rights?

    No, but that has nothing to do with taking locker room grievances public (in fact it’s almost the opposite — trying to make the locker room more inclusive), so I don’t follow your train of thought.

  • Phils Goodman

    He is, and it would be best done in private.

  • Brian

    What’s not smart about his comments? Did anyone think it would end with Cooper’s apology? Riley Cooper just alienated himself from the entire organization. LeSean McCoy just verbalized what everyone already knew.

  • Brian

    Open communication is in the foundation of Chip Kelly’s philosophy. It doesn’t change when things go wrong.

  • Brian

    It was already public. LeSean McCoy didn’t break the story.

  • Phils Goodman

    It’s not nearly as clear-cut as you are making it out to be. Per philly.com:

    However, another Eagles player said that there is a definite line being drawn between players who were ready to move on after the incident and those that aren’t sure if they can forget what Cooper said.

    I see 0 advantages for the team to have any of that locker room division being played out in public, as it is far more likely to weaken the locker room than to strengthen it. That’s what makes it not smart.

  • Phils Goodman

    You are being obtuse. LeSean McCoy “broke” his feelings about a possible deteriorating relationship with another player and also gave his assessment (arguably incorrect, or overgeneralized) that the rest of the team feels the same way.

  • Phils Goodman

    I don’t think Chip Kelly ever espoused using the media as the conduit for open communication.

  • A_T_G

    Interesting comparison. Why is it that “cracker” and “honky” are considered less offensive? They are used on network TV and black comedians get laughs using them.

  • aub32

    So you’re telling me that the guys that he’s about to spend more time with than anybody over the next 5 or so omnths don’t know how he feels already? Of course they do. The talk. So what’s the problem with us knowing. Do you think they’re reading these comment section and deciding that this really is a bigger deal than it is?

  • Brian

    I only agree to this point, as far as going forward. This interview was the day after all hell broke loose. If McCoy keeps talking this way, I will have a problem with it.

  • Brian

    I get it. I just don’t agree with it.

  • Brian

    Whatever. He’s gone now. Apparently, the problem is out of the locker room.

  • Phils Goodman

    He’s still on the team and will be back in the locker room soon enough. Vick said the players are still working on getting back to normalcy.