On Preserving Your Wedding Dress: What It Is, How to Do It, and Why You Have To

Shutterstock

Shutterstock

I have known of many a girl to do exactly what this letter writer did this week in Jezebel’s “Ask a Clean Person” column—that is, leave their wedding gown languishing for quite a while after their wedding before deciding to do anything with it, and finding it in not fantastic condition when they finally do—and so, I was actually curious to see what the answer was. (Usually, I just cut friends off with, “Er, I don’t know, call Carriage Trade,” when someone starts to tell me about a wedding dress with a long-neglected wine spill or hem tear.)




I definitely knew that the term "acid-free" was important when it came to the preserving of a wedding dress, but the tip in the expert's answer here about not just tossing your wedding gown into a plastic garment bag and thinking it will be white and bright and beautiful when it comes time for your daughter to glide down the aisle in it is a good one. Plastic won't work.

It can feel like a pain, yes—one more thing to do even though your wedding is over—and another expense, yes—one more thing to pay for even though your wedding is over—but there's no doubt in our minds that it's worth it. We have no doubt you—and your daughter, one day—will eventually think it is, too.

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