Bill to Rename 30th Street Station Passes the House

William H. Gray III 30th Street Station is one step closer after the bill passed the House via voice vote on Monday. People will probably still just call it 30th Street.

30th Street Station. Photo | Jeff Fusco

30th Street Station. Photo | Jeff Fusco

Congress cannot find a solution to the situation at the border, but it’s nice to know they can still agree on some things: On Monday, the bill that would rename 30th Street Station after Bill Gray passed in the House by voice vote. We told you last month about the plan to rename it William H. Gray III 30th Street Station.

Gray, who died last July, was the first African-American to serve as majority whip in the House of Representatives and the first to chair the House Budget Committee. The bill was introduced by Chaka Fattah, Gray’s successor, with the entire Pennsylvania House delegation signing on as co-sponsors.




“Renaming this historic station in Bill Gray’s honor would be a fitting tribute for a man and leader who did so much for the Philadelphia community—not only as a public servant, but as a businessman, friend, father, and minister,” Fattah said in a release last month. “His dedication to his constituency knew no bounds, but he was particularly passionate about investing resources in America’s infrastructure, and gave undue time and commitment to making 30th Street Station one of the finest train facilities in this country.”

Per Fattah, Gray was instrumental in getting a large portion of the $78 million in funds that renovated 30th Street. He was a key sponsor of a $13 million Urban Development Action Grant and helped secure $30 million in bond funding for the station's renovation. 30th Street is Amtrak's third-busiest station; SEPTA regional rail trains and NJ Transit's Atlantic City Line also stop at the station. Thanks in part due to the renovations, 30th Street is no doubt one of the most beautiful train stations in the country.

Fattah tells the Inquirer he expects everyone to still call it 30th Street.

[Inquirer]

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