Nutter Offers Support to Host Super Bowl

“We can do it better than anyone else.”

Philadelphia’s pursuit of a Super Bowl looks increasingly like a real thing. The latest evidence? Mayor Michael Nutter has come out in favor of hosting the event, telling NJ.com: “”Heck, yeah, we want it. And we can do it better than anyone else.”

“It would provide a substantial economic benefit to the city and its growing hospitality sector,” Nutter said. “It would mean an international focus on a city that is emerging as a desired destination for international visitors. And it would offer us the opportunity to market Philadelphia to a national audience. When it comes to doing big events and rolling out the red carpet, no city does it any better than the City of Brotherly Love and Sisterly Affection.”

Philadelphia would be the ideal place for NFL Commissioner Rodger Goodell to award a Super Bowl for another reason, Nutter said: city residents.




“Philadelphia has some of the most ardent and best informed sports fans in the country," he said. "And having the Super Bowl at Lincoln Financial Field would be a tremendous development in our city’s sports history."

Nutter's point of view is echoed in NJ.com's list of five reasons Philly would make a good host.  No. 1: Upgrades planned at the Linc.

Lurie and the Eagles will put $125 million into Lincoln Financial Field to spruce it up. Before the start of the 2014 season, the Eagles plan to add new high-definition video boards, Wi-Fi for the fans, bridges to connect both sides of the upper concourse and nearly 1,600 new seats -- bringing the total seating to 70,000.

But there will be competition. NBCSports reports: "We’ve already noted that Denver andPhiladelphia are angling to host future Super Bowls. Other places that want to get into the mix include Chicago, Washington and New England.The Associated Press notes that Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel has already begun lobbying NFL commissioner Roger Goodell for a Super Bowl, while Daniel Snyder and Robert Kraft have spoken up for Washington and New England."

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