Those Awesome Eagles Snow Bowl Pics Were Very Hard to Take

Autofocus isn’t that great in bad weather.

Dec 8, 2013; Philadelphia, PA, USA; Philadelphia Eagles quarterback Nick Foles (9) hands off to running back LeSean McCoy (25) during the second quarter against the Detroit Lions at Lincoln Financial Field. Photo | Howard Smith-USA TODAY Sports

Dec 8, 2013; Philadelphia, PA, USA; Philadelphia Eagles quarterback Nick Foles (9) hands off to running back LeSean McCoy (25) during the second quarter against the Detroit Lions at Lincoln Financial Field. Photo | Howard Smith-USA TODAY Sports

Wilmington photographer Kyle Grantham has a great post at PetaPixel about all those great photos in the snow from Sunday’s Eagles’ win over the Lions. Taking pictures in bad weather, it turns out, is very hard to do.

While shooting football in the snow makes for fantastic photos, it’s also the most challenging scenario a modern photojournalist can find themselves in. Cameras today rely so heavily on autofocus for sports that snow renders them functionally useless. Imagine trying to photograph someone standing behind a waterfall. Even if you can see them clearly, no matter what you do your camera focuses only the water. The same went for every thick snowflake between me and the players on the field, and when you consider there were thousands falling every second the challenge was daunting.

He concludes: “I have to say, the photos I came back with are some of the best I’ve ever made at a football game, and when the snow let up in the second half, I had a new appreciation for the autofocus button I could finally flip back to “on” mode.”


 

  • Joseph_S

    Hey Joel. Your article is interesting, but your grammar is atrocious! You said, “…the most challenging scenario a modern photojournalist (SINGULAR) can find themselves (PLURAL) in.” it should read as follows: “…the most challenging scenario a modern photojournalist can find himself in.” A journalist should know better! The words – he, him, himself – can be gender-specific, but they’re also gender-neutral, if the gender isn’t known, or if you want to cover any person who may be involved in an activity, such as a photojournalist. Sorry Mr. Mathis, but I cringe at bad grammar. (You can also use the bulky, but correct: “…a modern photojournalist can find himself or herself in.” JS