Jennifer Weiner Responds to Jonathan Franzen’s Internet Slam

Last week, esteemed old white guy author Jonathan Franzen offered up a lengthy old white guy rant diatribe against the Internet, Twitter, and how modern technology enables and encourages “Jennifer-Weinerish self-promotion.”

Jennifer Weiner, a Philadelphia novelist, was not amused. She responds in The New Republic:

Maybe Franzen takes issue specifically with my use of Twitter, which falls into two broad categories: urging mainstream publications toward more inclusive book coverage and live-tweeting “The Bachelor.” Neither preoccupation has done much for my book sales, so neither one is truly self-promotional.

Maybe it’s personal.

In 2010, I coined the hashtag Franzenfreude. It was very bad German for a very real problem: When Franzen’s most recent novel, Freedom, was published, newspapers and magazines devoted thousands of words to the book and its author, while giving other literary books far less attention, and, in some cases, ignoring commercial works completely. Perhaps Franzen’s recent name-check was payback for when I implied that he was the face of white male literary privilege, or for pointing out that he’s the kind of writer who goes on Facebook only to announce that he won’t be doing Facebook, with the implication that he doesn’t have to do Facebook, because the media does his status updates for him. Or maybe he just really, really hates “The Bachelor.”

Other literary writers have won prizes, or Oprah’s endorsement. Other writers have appeared on Time’s cover, or have been able to shun social media, but only Franzen’s done it all. From his privileged perch, he can pick and choose, deciding which British newspaper gets the honor of running his 5600-word condemnation of self-promotion that ends with an unironic hyperlinked invitation to buy his new book. Few—no—other writers have it so good. For the rest of us—commercial and literary alike—there is social media for fun, ads and tours for publicity, billboards and book trailers only if we’re lucky.

Ouch. Maybe “Weiner-ish self-promotion” means “offering up well-aimed shivs at the heart of your critics.”

 

  • vceross

    I’m surprised that Franzen, a distinguished writer, even spoke of Weiner, a pop writer. By mentioning her, he provides her with still more opportunities for self-promotion, ironically enough. He shouldn’t have dignified her with criticism. She’s someone who tweets on The Bachelor, which means she actually watches it and is sufficiently moved by it to write about it. That is not Franzen’s world, thank goodness.