Philadelphia Cyclists Finally Get What’s Coming to ‘Em

More policing of maniacs on two wheels brings hope to city drivers

The Boyfriend says that bikers throughout the city of Philadelphia know well the hum of my 2000 Land Rover Discovery. You know what I say? I wish they did. Then maybe they’d get the hell out of the way. Normally, my temperament doesn’t really tend toward incidents of road rage. (Extreme Pedestrian Rage, maybe, but that’s a whole other story). Rather, I’m the type to send a grateful prayer up to baby Jesus when I have a close call on the road, rather than curse the jackass who caused it. But years of negotiating city roads with less than conscientious bikers pedaling haphazardly around my moving vehicle like spastic pinballs have more than provided an exception to this norm.

When the city created the first significant batch of bike lanes back in late 2009, I enjoyed the glimmer of hope that this would solve the animosity between drivers and bikers in Center City. A place for everything, and everything in its place, I thought, and they’ll stay in their lanes and we drivers will stay in ours, and there will be set rules we’ll all blissfully follow—and surely they won’t need to go on the sidewalks anymore, what with a home to call their own, now—and we’ll all live happily ever after. The glimmer lasted about a minute.

As far as I could tell, the lanes seemed to validate their existence as bikers—not in the fair, we’re-all-equal-now kind of way, but in a way that seemed to bolster their assertion that they could go where they wanted and do what they pleased upon their two special wheels. They became bolder. They continued to ride in my lane, theirs running parallel and empty beside them. They came up behind me from the left side and made a right turn in front of me, just as the light turned from red to green. I’ve idled in the middle of the road, waiting for a biker to pass me—not just in my lane again, but coming toward me, going west on Pine—and stumbled and gasped as they’ve zoomed past while I teetered down the sidewalk carrying my weight in groceries. I think my favorite had to be when I sat at a light, watching in my rearview as some hipster coasted through the miniscule alleyway between the passenger side of cars parked along the left side of the road and the driver side of cars waiting at the light in their lane, snapping off a lovely collection of side mirrors as he went like some sort of wayward SEPTA bus.

So you’ll have to forgive me if, when in late April, the city announced not only the opening of more bike lanes, but implemented the touchy-feely Give Respect-Get Respect campaign, directed at reducing accidents between cyclists and motorists, I barely raised an eyebrow. Bikers just always struck me as your fifth-grade class clown who could always charm his way out of getting in trouble, or the idiot bobbing and weaving 110 mph down 95 at rush hour, with nary a cop to be seen: Nothing will ever happen to them, I thought. If anything, motorists will start getting tickets more, the mean, much heavier and powerful bullies getting punished, even in cases where it was the little guy’s fault.

I am happy to say that the stats printed in yesterday’s Daily News article chronicling the progress of the whole Give Respect-Get Respect thing have proved me wrong: 803 police stops, 600 of them for cyclists! Not only that, but quotes from cops assessing that it is indeed the cyclists who seem to be breaking the rules. Hallelujah, justice has been served, I thought—at least to the potential 600 drivers or pedestrians who were startled or infuriated or even, perhaps, had their vehicles damaged as a result of whatever those bikers were illegally doing.

I think that biking around the city is a great idea—a great, green, healthy, efficient idea. I think that the city should make it easier for people to implement this great, green, healthy, efficient mode of personal transportation. I know this. And for those biking Philadelphians who do so peacefully, rock on. But for those of you who flail around Philly like you’re Evel Knievel and the cars around you are soft, fluffy blobs of marshmallow operated by people on their best, most alert ten-and-two driving behavior at all times, look alive. The party is over.

  • rich

    i couldn’t agree anymore. i am hoping that someday, i get to witness one of those creeps get slammed head on by a septa bus. i promise you, i will get out of my vehicle and laugh

  • anthony

    Rich, its because you are a sicko that you want to see someone get hit by a bus. Your probably overweight, approaching a life a diabetes and hate to exercise. Now that..is worth laughing about.

  • Jim

    Laugh at a persons death? Wow! Fate has a way of making statements like that come back to haunt you. Look both ways fine citizen.

  • Jess

    This spring, I was involved in an incident with a cyclist. By all accounts the collision was his fault yet he’s suing my insurance company and I have to pay to have the damage repaired. I appreciate the tickets but feel there should also be an insurance program for on-road cycling to financially protect drivers.

  • Jason

    Ultimately what it all comes down to is sharing the road. If you are a motorist then all you see are bikers not abiding by the laws. If you are a cyclist then all you see are enraged drivers, screaming out their windows whenever they have to slow down or (god forbid) have to stop their car to yield to a biker. The fact of the matter is that there are extremes. There is the biker who has no regard for rules, motorists, or people…and then there is the motorist who has no patience or tolerance for anybody to be own the road but him. Most of the motorists out there ant these people, and most of the bikers aren’t these bikers.

    I support rules and regulations for bikers to abide by, and I support punishment for those who don’t. But for the overly angry motorist who loves to yell at bikers and refuses to share the road…then I support taking a kryptonite u-lock to their side mirrors.

    As somebody who both drives and rides a bike I can tell you that no matter how many bikes are on the road….there are plenty more cars. And if you are really that upset for not being able to make it to the next stop sign or red light faster because there is a bicyclist minding his own business in front of you then you need to check on your rage. Don’t be jealous because he can weave between those cars with ease and make it to his destination faster than you, with a parking spot right out front no less. If it’s really that big a deal that, than buy a bike!

    Bikers are not going away, but if you keep cursing me out your window for because “I’m in your way”, then I can guarantee your going to lose your side view mirror and finally have a reason to curse me out.

  • tara

    i’m so happy to hear that bikers are finally going to learn a lesson. at the intersection of ridge ave and main st. in manayunk, bikers ride on both sides of cars, constantly go in the wrong direction, and ALWAYS run the lights. same at green lane and main street. my thought has always been that if you’re riding on the road, you obey ALL the rules of the road – you can’t just pick and choose if you’re a bike or a car, or if the rules apply to you or not. when i do see the occasional biker riding and stopping correctly, i just want to get out of my car and thank them.

  • Brian

    When bikers have the same rights as motorists, then maybe they will uphold the same responsibilities. Bikers are as vulnerable as pedestrians but expected to exist in the same space as 3000 pound vehicles. Bikers ride the way they do, because it is safer for them. They’re not flaunting their disdain for the rules just because they can. When you have to worry about a car making a right hand turn from the left lane, without looking for other cars, let alone a biker, and without signaling, it is better to make sure that you are at the front of the line at red lights, which means moving through traffic and avoiding side mirrors as best as possible.
    The best thing anyone can do is take a deep breath, whisper whatever you need to to “baby jesus” and be glad no one has been hurt and go on your way.

  • Jessica

    Carrie, you are a woman after my heart. Between this and the article in defense of Uggs, you truly are my Philly Mag hero! Keep reading my mind and writing about it!

  • Steve

    Side stepping the truth that car idolizing bravado might make you feel good, but is just a form of bullying those who are riding bikes or walking. Also, side steeping the deeply one-sided equation that you arriving to your destination 2 seconds late equals life and death for a cyclist (who is a real person with a family); i just wanted to make two things clear.
    1) not all cyclists are the same; goes with drivers too. Some are there for sport, some for transportation, some are good, some don’t care about any rules. But I understand that lumping them all together makes it easy and more satisfying to belittle them.
    2) Referring to cyclists who are not morons, drunk, or out to get you… to Rules of the road are made for cars, not bikes. They have to follow the rules, as do cares, but doing so usually makes situations more unsafe for both. When you see a cyclist run the light at Ridge and Main st., it is likely because it is more safe for everyone if the cyclist moves ahead and gets out of sync with traffic. Trust me, if every cyclist followed very rule of the road, there would be more problems then there are now. Following all the rules to the letter (which drivers seldom do; be honest) put cyclist in closer quarters with cars for a longer duration. When that cyclist goes through a stop sign, he/she is now out of sync with traffic and less likely to be in your way.
    I now that may require some thought and goes against the cars-are-superior mentality, but go out on a limb and think about it.
    Unless you are out on the street on a bicycle for any period of time, your points are invalid. You have no idea how the traffic laws effect a cyclist trying to get from A to B. The last thing a person on a bike is thinking is “how can I piss off this driver or hit a pedestrian?” They are thinking about how to safely navigated the immediate situation and arrive at their destination safely. More than likely that is the same thing you are thinking; so lets give each other a break…
    Those who oppose cyclists, next time you have the opportunity, go for a bike ride; you might actually have fun.

  • Dan

    Blonde chick with fourth grade literary skills who drives a Land Rover attempts to threaten cyclists with the “hum” of her vehicle. Anyone else seeing the irony here?

    • Silvio

      Dan, I can only hope she doesn’t even notice when she backs over you.

  • Mike

    Its sad to read many of the comments that cheer on the destruction of human life in any way shape or form.
    I also find the blatant hypocritical views staggering. All drivers break the rules of the road. Everyone has sped, rolled a stop sign, or made an illegal turn, yet when a cyclist rolls a stop sign (to avoid putting a foot down and slowing those in their cars down further) its the end of the world.

    To the author: Does your Boyfriend’s 11 year old Land Rover give you the right to drive around without limitation from others around you? I’m sorry you have to deal with so many pleebs from the view of your likely broken semi luxury suv. Keep rockin’ those uggs and don’t think too hard.

  • Phiny

    There have been so many times, that I, as a cyclist have had to avoid near accident situations caused by cars. Cyclists are the lowest on the totem pole. We have to be careful that cars dont run us over, we have to be wary of pedestrians who seem to be oblivious, and we have to be careful of other cyclists.

    I agree and there are definitely cyclists who are ridicilous and are a danger to themselves and others on the road, but thats not the majority. Those that disregard a general rule of safety, should be held responsible in the same way a car should. But in the same way it is mentioned that when there are “less than conscientious bikers” on the road with “nary a copy to be seen”, there are far more unsafe drivers who get away with far worse.

    And why is it ok for cars to park in the bike lane with flashers on? Is it ok for a car to park in the regular lane? No it’s not. How many times will I have to hear an idiot in a car honking at a cyclist, even though its rush hour, even though the streets are backed up, and that car isn’t going to go anywhere any faster. Motorists are for the most part ignorant and rageful. And the last time I checked, cars and bicycles aren’t exactly an even match.

    I think the author of this article needs to get out of her Land Rover, and spend a couple of weeks riding a bike and then revisit this topic. I’d like to see how callous she is then.

  • steveeboy

    “people on their best, most alert ten-and-two driving behavior at all times”

    so, you admit that when you drive you drive like an idiot, are not at your most alert, and fail to follow proper procedures?

    That admission pretty much backs up the initial impression your writing provides.

    good to know.

    • boxy

      I don’t see that “admission” at all. Whatchu been smokin’, Stevo?

  • Jason

    As a long time Philly Mag reader, I am truly disappointed that such an article was published. I am a city resident, a professional, a business owner, an avid cyclist and a daily commuter, not a ‘hipster’. While I do weave lanes, my reasons have already been echoed by Steve, Jason and Brian.

    I challenge the author to try on a bike just as she did the uggs. I challenge her to commit to commuting to work for one month and then write a second article on her experience, be it good or bad. I will even pro ide the equipment. Without such a point of view your article is nothing more than a misinformed and unproductive rant.

  • Natalie Hope McDonald

    Most progressive cities in the world welcome cyclists and gladly make room for them. The bike lanes throughout Philly have been a great start, even though roads here can be narrow and bicyclists can face a lot of dangers (namely from drivers who block the bike lines and do everything from text, talk and eat Happy Meals behind the wheel). Rather than continue the debate about who’s better – cyclists or drivers – it might be interesting to make room for both in a way that makes for better transportation options for all (bikes will cut back on traffic in the long run). Plus, it’s hard to argue against cycling not only being good for exercise and the environment (as Carrie rightly points out) as well as being one way to avoid hefty parking fees and eager PPA agents. And, yeah, I don’t envy anyone who has to gas up a Hummer in this day and age.

  • Greg

    Your community college creative writing degree is really paying off for you huh ? Take your 2000 Land Rover Discovery and Uggs back to South Jersey.

  • Portal Princess

    This is all quite simple: all users of the road need to obey the law. Respectful cyclists & drivers – keep doing what you’re doing. Idiots of all stripes – cut it out!

    I don’t buy the idea that bicyclists can ignore the rules of the road in the best interests of “safety”; this is a convenient justification. I’m sure it’s what moron bikers think when they ride the wrong way down a one-way street and nearly run me over when I’ m on foot.

    Impatient, intolerant drivers need to chill out. It doesn’t kill you to let a bike go first and bikes do have rights to ride in traffic lanes if there aren’t bike lanes. I second what an earlier respondent says about rethinking parking lanes to allow for more bike lanes – that would help everyone.

  • The Craigerator

    Blonde bimbo from Main Line threatens cyclist with Range Rover. Cyclist reaches into window at stop light and breaks bimbo’s nose. Pedals off into the sunset.

    Don’t let the Lycra fool you. I will rip you out of your car and beat your azz if you attempt to run down myself or any of my friends.

  • Jim

    This blog is the stupidest thing I’ve ever read. You’re an idiot Carrie.

  • Zakk

    Hey “Craigerator”…where in this story does the author threaten to run anyone down? I must have missed that line. Maybe in your blind rage you also skipped past the last paragraph where she gives props to peaceful bikers who respect both cars and pedestrians. And you know that online threats are the same as real live ones, right Lycra tough guy? Talk of punching women would really undercut your argument–that is, if you were making any sort of coherent point at all. Job well done!

  • Jeff

    What is wrong with you people?!? You’re certainly welcome to disagree with an opinion piece, but what gives you the right to make such unkind and hurtful comments to the author? Blonde bimbo? Community college creative writing? Fourth grade literary skills? Really???

    Again I ask…what is wrong with you and WHO raised you? You should be ashamed of yourselves, Jim, Greg, Craigerator, Mike, Dan and I pray I never meet you.

  • Mike

    Jeff,

    My parents raised me. They raised me to be logical and assertive. They taught me how to defend myself against those in the world who aim to cause harm to myself or my friends.
    The author shows a blatant disregard for quality journalism. The disjointed argument quickly goes from threat, to wishful backpedaling in the span of a few paragraphs. The mag should be embarrassed to staff people like this.

    I pray I never meet you Jeff, as I feel any further conversation with you would just give me a bigger headache than what reading this article has done already.

  • Jeff

    Oh right. I forgot the part about where she threatened to cause harm to you or your friends.

  • John Street

    Argh! You bunch of f*cking knuckleheads. CYCLISTS, not BIKERS. Bikers ride Harleys, Cyclists wear spandex. GIANT difference.

  • Mike

    Hi again Jeff,

    I see you know sarcasm well, but please allow me do some analysis on Carrie’s opening line and perhaps you will see the veiled threat I refer to.

    “The Boyfriend says that bikers throughout the city of Philadelphia know well the hum of my 2000 Land Rover Discovery. You know what I say? I wish they did. Then maybe they’d get the hell out of the way.”

    Why would a biker know the “hum” of her land rover? The author is clearly asserting that bikers should fear cars (hers), and as such “get the hell out of the way”.

    Please feel free to correct me if you feel I am incorrect in my analysis.

    Carrie, The above is how you formulate a respectful, well organized argument.

  • Johnny

    Carrie,

    Do you like fitness?

  • Sara

    Wow. You guys are a bunch of unhappy assholes and I feel sorry for you.

    Keep up the good work, Carrie!

  • Wes

    Jeff,
    I agree the author does not directly threaten bikers, (although I’d like to know exactly what would happen to me if I did not “get the hell out of the way” after hearing the hum of a Land Rover) however the attitude and sense of entitlement to the road sets a precedence and gives justification to the maniac motorists out there that that will swerve into, throw garbage, “buzz” and totally disrespect anybody that is in “their” road. It is a display of ignorance and total disregard to the big picture that a mother, daughter, father, son or simply anybody that wants to go for bike ride on nice day could be killed because they are not aware of a land rover (or ford tempo, hummer, BMW) bearing down on them.

  • jeff

    Oh I get it. That doesn’t justify someone calling her an uneducated blonde bimbo and threatening to break her nose through the car window though, right? That’s completely unacceptable.

    Like I said before, everyone is entitled to their opinions….it’s just sad that people get off on being so rude. Oh well, the world is full of unhappy people I guess!

  • Suzanne

    I powerwalk on East River Drive most days where many bikers feel they have the right of way. I have had to move quickly to get out of the way. I watched as one biker knocked another leisure rider off her bike and rode away as she was lying on the ground in pain. I also watched a biker knock over a three year old child and keep riding. Bikers also seem to expect the runners and walkers to move out of their way quickly or risk getting knocked out of the way. Of course not all bikers do this. Some politely signal that they are on the left. Maybe the others should treat pedestrians the way they would like to be treated by drivers.

  • John S.

    I am horrified by the comments here. People should be ashamed of themselves. If you don’t agree with the argument than say so, but the personal attacks are completely out of line.

  • Jessica Black

    It’s a day later and I’m still really bothered by this article. I have been thinking about cycling to work but it’s my fear of hostile motorists that has been holding me back. Another reason: Those wonderful bike lanes Carrie mentions? They’re still few and far between. And some of them are filled with broken glass, temporary dumpsters, and parked cars. And sidewalks of course are off limits. So where is a cyclist supposed to go? Until I can figure out a safe answer to that question, I don’t feel brave enough to ride to work.

    Yes its important to obey the rules. And yes, some people break them (on both sides). But the playing field is not level.

    Cars are big. Bikes are small. When a CAR driver breaks the rules (or just gets distracted for a moment), the outcome can be catastrophic and cyclists risk injury or death. Rarely do you hear of drivers injured because of a bike slamming into their car.

    Don’t get me wrong, I drive too and I know how rattling it is when you’ve got bikes weaving through lanes or when a cyclist seems to come out of nowhere. It doesn’t make me angry though. It reminds me that I need to be a careful driver. But not just because there are bicycles in the city.

    It’s a city. A big busy city. There are cars, traffic lights, strollers, wheel chairs, construction sites, jay walkers, lane closures, trucks unloading, double parked cars, unleashed dogs, and occasionally a child running into the street. You have to have a boatload of patience and the ability to have your eyes on everything at once. That’s city driving. It’s also city cycling. And city walking.

    I join with the others in encouraging Carrie to take on the challenge to bike to work. I think this would make for a fascinating article and I would genuinely be interested to hear about Carrie’s experience and whether it affects her opinion at all.

  • Jay Gurcsik

    Sadly, she actually does write like a community college creative writing student. She explains that somehow riskier bike usage is on the rise, naming herself as a source. Yet Issac Newton would turn his grave at the thought of somehow all cyclists would behave even worse once behavioral laws were established and enforced.

    Once she gets the reader riled up, she then falls shorter and contradicts herself. “When I say all bikers, I mean just the bad ones, and you shouldn’t be so offended at what I just wrote.” The last paragraph may possibly not even be her own work but an editor who feared a backlash. But if you mean to write it one way, finish it the same way. Don’t simply floor it, weaving in-and-out of traffic and then casually flicker a turn signal when you’d like to gingerly parallel park your progressive-bumper-stickered car, so to speak.

    From a driver, pedestrian, runner, cyclist, and biker (two very different titles), I generally agree with what she is saying. Enforcement needs to be stepped up but not be targeted only at cyclists. Drivers are equally the problem too. And in reality, the city just doesn’t have the cash to fund additional enforcement. So just as quickly as people honk at another driver, help everyone out and speak up when you spot a wrongdoing. At least she provided her full name when she wrote this piece.

  • Jeremy

    I bet a lot of these incidents happen in the no-bike land in Center City. The north-south lane on 11th St. ends abruptly south of South St., then becomes a free-for-all where cars will try to make it a two-lane road, with no room for bikes. So it’s always a contest to get to Spruce St. with your limbs still attached. Then the bike-lane on 13th disappears as well, and doesn’t return until you’ve passed Vine St.

  • Wow. Just wow.

    Shockingly poor writing, cyclist vs. motorist debate aside.

    The editors of this blog should start a contest to find some promising writers. Perhaps the editors could pit detractors against Philly Post writers and choose winners. Can’t get worse. Just when I thought getting rid of Kelly Rowell was a start, along come Ms. Denny and Mr. Callahan.

  • The real Craigerator

    I want to be as unbiased as possible with this response but like Jay Gurcsik, I too am a Driver, cyclist, biker, runner, and pedestrian at times.
    So remaining unbiased is not going to be possible.
    I still see no relevance in the author attempting to brag about her car, it served no purpose and really just shows how not Green the author actually is.
    I digress…
    The most interesting thing about this article, by far, are the comments. These, for the most part, show how strong the cycling community is, and how most cyclists share the same concerns. I do not think the author did as much research or spent as much time in writing this article as she did
    with her Uggs article (yes i read it just to make sure), Absolutely Not. However, I applaud Carrie for taking the leap and writing about something
    she is not familiar with, she tried and she failed, it happens. I am not going to write Carrie off completely, if she writes an article about jeggings, I am sure it will be literary gold.

  • schnarf p. butkis

    please leave transportation policy to the experts. y’know, the ones putting in the bike lanes and making it more and more difficult to drive your hulking monstrosity through narrow colonial streets.
    go rove some other land if it bothers you so much.

  • Zakk

    Hey Craigerator…think you can give us an unbiased explanation for why you bragged about punching a this author–a woman–in the face? You and a lot of the cyclists commenting here aren’t proving that your community is strong. You’re doing the opposite–and giving responsible, rational cyclists a bad name. Grow up.

  • the real craigerator

    That was not me. That was craigerator. I am the real craigerator. So I accept your apology. So there!

  • Zakks new best Friend Craig – formerly The real Craigerator

    From this point forward I am going under the name Zakks new best friend Craig. “The real craigerator” will not do, I do not wish to be confused with craigerator (he is too angry for me). I would not threaten someone like that, I actually gave the author Kudos for trying and for her fashion article about uggs (looking forward to a piece on jeggings). I am still waiting for my apology from Zakk so we can be besties.

  • Ellen P

    I don’t normally comment on blogs (as I have much more interesting things going on in my life) but I was so utterly appalled at the personal attacks on here that I just could not stay silent.

    In case you weren’t aware, this is an OPINION piece where the author happens to APPLAUD those cyclists that do practice safe, responsible riding (did you miss that???) She has a right to her OPINION and a right to inject humor where she feels like it (are in incapable of recognizing humor? That’s sad). You have a right to your own opinion too! So feel free to argue it, but crossing the line into personal attacks on the author is completely unacceptable and repulsive. This is a person with a family and feelings and someone who obviously reads these comments. Would you say these things to her face? Shame on you and have fun in hell.

    My advice to the low life assholes on here (Mike, Dan, Jim, Craigerator, Jay, Greg, etc etc): Turn off the computer, change out of your sweatpants, climb out of your Mom’s basement and get a life.

  • Michelle Carini

    Couldn’t agree more Ellen P!!!!

  • Jim Kleiss

    First off, this article is very poorly written. Secondly, is the author saying she obeys every vehicle law? She never uses her cell-phone when in city limits? She never speeds? She ALWAYS comes to a complete stop at a stop sign?

    I am not a bike rider, but this article is truly one-sided with no thought to the other point of view. I have seen cars purposely cut off bikers out of frustration. I have consistently seen cars parked in the bike lane, and roads, for that matter. Why is there no article written complaining about this?

    Commenter Jason summed it up very nicely. Carrie, I hope your next article is about cars who block intersections and cross-walks, who double-park, and park in bike lanes. Otherwise you will lose complete credibility, and prove yourself to use this outlet only as a personal venting board. Complete garbage!

  • JL

    This post seems like a ploy to drive more traffic to the website. I can’t honestly believe that an editor would let them go to print unless hoping it would bring backlash and site hits.

    Having an aggressive title “Philadelphia Cyclists Finally Get What’s Coming to ‘Em.
    More policing of maniacs on two wheels brings hope to city drivers” followed by many stereotypical points – isn’t made okay by adding a paragraph in the end saying – oh but some of you are cool.

    Substitute “Cyclist” with a race, gender, religion, job title or any other group of people and then see how it reads. It’s extreme journalism to make a rise out of people and it’s tacky and cheap to attack a whole group in such a lazy way.

  • TM

    Did you get your degree from the Carrie Bradshaw School of Journalism?

  • Heyduke

    What kind of a-hole boasts of driving an SUV?

  • Heyduke

    P.S. I’m canceling my subscription because of this post.

  • john

    bikers trying to justify weaving in and out of traffic, going against the light and just plain going against traffic is priceless.

  • Marco

    You are probably a horrible driver. It scares me that they gives driver’s licenses to people like you. You should be forced to ride an adult-trike to your Bikram Class/ Cafe/ Anthroplogie jaunts. Only Philly mag could provide such a burbo-centric voice for the Pro-Landrover crowd. For Shame!

  • Nick

    Ha! I can’t imagine how hard Carrie is laughing at these posts!!!! Hilarious!

  • http://www.greenphillyblog.com Chrissy
  • Ethan

    Wait, so did ANYONE actually READ her article? Or did this line just get skipped over: “And for those biking Philadelphians who do so peacefully, rock on” ? It’s amazing what little it takes to get people riled up and disgustingly angry. I guarantee if you ever actually met her, you’d be reduced to quivering little boys, rather than, what was it? Oh, right, “beating her azz.” Keep it classy, Philly.

  • Adam

    Ethan, she still threatened cyclists. It’s throwing fuel on a fire that does no need to burn. We are all humans, and human lives…we should respect and protect that mere fact.

    When someone stops short at a stop light, do you run into them? Why would you do so to a cyclist or pedestrian or jogger or dog walker or homeless veteran in a wheelchair?

  • Megan

    You honestly think that cyclists “get away with murder” as motorists get shit on?!? You couldn’t be more wrong bitch. 2 years ago my boyfriend was riding
    home from Delco on Passyunk towards Snyder, IN the bike lane with lights on the front and back
    of his bike. He was following bike laws, then some dumb bitch (possible relation to you?) came
    veering into the bike lane going 40mph and struck
    him while pinning him under her car, she then fled after being a bitch TO him after SHE hit him! When the cops showed up they treated HIM like the criminal, telling him to surrender all weapons (a legal pocket knife) and to “keep hands where they can see him”. HE WAS HIT BY A CAR, but because the cops and people like you know NOTHING about these individual bikers, just a whole of “assholes”, he was treated like a criminal. Get your facts straight and stop assuming that just because you don’t stop for every friggin stop sign down Morris St, that you *must* be some kind of low life moron. These people make your overpriced cakes at Whole Foods, they deliver your “important papers” to your office, they walk your prissy ass dog in the park, the ring up your remodels at Lowes, they help you with new couches for your “flat” in old city at Ikea, and they babysit your spoiled little brats. Give them a break, they’re just trying to live just like YOU.

  • Ethan

    Adam, I still fail to see how the writer threatened cyclists in any way. She said that some of them break the rules, and that that’s hazardous, and that she’s glad they seem to be getting tickets now. I don’t think she ever insinuated that’ she’d run over a homeles veteran in a wheelchair, for god’s sake. If anyone is threatening someone, it’s the classless commenters on this site.

  • http://docwheelies.com sean

    carrie denny, this is rotten! this serves no good purpose, you’re just throwing gasoline on the fire. is your thinly veiled threat of using your landrover’s hum good behavior? stay classy carrie.

    guess i’ll spend a few minutes contacting the companies that advertise here at the philly post and ask these companies if they share these rotten, bullying sentiments

  • Anne Lynn

    This is disgusting, uninformed “journalism,” and continued evidence of Philly Mag’s disconnection with the city.

    Someone should take away your privilege to publish, and your fucking driver’s license.

  • Oh, Megan.

    Nice, Megan! “Get away with murder” shouldn’t be in quotes. Carrie never wrote that. You need a comma before the word ‘bitch.’ ‘Two’ should be spelled out; you never begin a sentence with a numeral. You don’t really need the comma before your all-capped ‘IN.’ You also have a major run-on sentence going on here! Oh, lordy! Let’s see, a comma would be nice after ‘pinning him under her car.’ Also, why are you emphasizing ‘bitch TO him’? I think the emphasis should be placed on ‘him.’ Transpose the comma and quotation marks. Also, “just a whole of ASSHOLES.” What does that even mean? It makes no sense. You need a period after “St.” Why the asterisks flanking the “must”? You’ve been capitalizing whole words to indicate emphasis. A little bit of consistency issues, perhaps? It’s okay. You seem really angry. It’s Lowe’s, doll, too, and we don’t call them “flats” around here. Also, IKEA? Old City is capitalized, since it’s the name of a neighborhood. Whew! That’s better.

  • Adam

    Ethan-

    “Scaring a cyclist” with the “hum” of a vehicle (in some states considered a concealed weapon) is like brandishing a firearm. I know you will likely never understand if you yourself are not a cyclist or haven’t been buzzed by a car traveling too fast, too close.

    “Classless,” is it classy to throw gasoline on a fire and walk away to let it burn? That’s what Carrie did by writing such an article. Maybe she didn’t intended to attack cyclists with her less than journalistic proverbs, but she continues an argument that has scary potential. The more motorists feel that cyclists are some miscreant race of terrorists the more reason it gives them to have rage towards us when they go about their daily travels. Fact is, most drivers are very safe, respectable, law-abiding and polite, in fact when I had a flat on Tuesday a kind driver stopped to ask if I needed help…but the very few who aren’t represent an incredible potential for danger. Accidents do happen, that’s the risk we run when we strap a helmet on our head but wonton disregard for life by belittling the life of another human because you don’t like them being on the road is reckless-be it journalism, belief or action.

    Personally, I don’t think Carrie was talking to me per say, the competitive rider who rides on country roads as far to the right as is safely possible. I think she is talking about city riders who feel that they own the road. Just as dangerous a thought because the average motorist doesn’t disassociate reckless cyclists from law-abiding, safety practicing riders. We are lumped into one generalized group of pests, which we are not.

    I think it’s fair to say that Carrie was trying to be funny and call out a group of people that she hasn’t taken a real attempt to understand. I work in the media and journalism realm and one work practice, as well as life practice I try to abide by is: understand before you cast judgement. After understanding you subject, be it that you still disagree, then it is inherently your responsibility to provide a better option. That, my friend, is journalism.

    I would like for Carrie to join a local group ride and commute to work by bicycle just once…and afterwards follow up this article with her own personal solution.

  • kate

    i drive a car in philadelphia but like any halfway decent person i care about the safety of the bikers and pedestrians that i share the road with. the simple fact is that everyone needs to pay more attention and be respectful- cars, bikers, and pedestrians. cars have hit bikers, bikers have hit pedestrians, pedestrians have caused car/bike accidents- it goes all ways. people who are not paying attention or are not being a defensive driver/biker/walker in a busy city cause accidents, not one group alone. we all have to co-exist together and awareness is key to maintain a safe environment, not the “every car for themselves!” attitude that you seem to have.

    frankly, i cannot fully take your opinion seriously on an intellectual level because your arguments, your writing style, and the subject matter you choose to write about indicate that you are incapable of contributing to this website in any sort of halfway intelligent manner. at first i thought a high school student wrote this because i couldn’t imagine how an educated adult could come to your conclusion but obviously i was wrong.

    i guess anyone can contribute to philly mag these days. perhaps if i wrote an article about how crocs are fashionable i would get published too! (uggs? really??)

  • Gauge

    People who need to be somewhere just a ‘little bit’ faster get all road rage and want someone just trying to get somewhere, albeit a bit slower, to die? Anyone with this mentality doesn’t deserve to drive a car. They don’t have the emotional maturity to use it.

  • Megan

    Thank you, Mrs. Simpson for correcting my grammar and spelling! Oh wait, you’re NOT my 7th grade English teacher!

    Avoiding the point by correcting someone’s grammar and spelling is a really pathetic defense mechanism. Why don’t you reply with something about what I wrote, instead of judging *how* I wrote it? : )

  • Adam

    Thank you Kate!

  • Kate

    Megan,

    And judging *how* she wrote her piece and accusing her of being something she is not IS acceptable? Interesting. You’re an idiot.

  • Kate

    Shut up, Adam. I hate you too. In fact, I hate the world.

  • TM

    In Los Angeles, harrassing a cyclist is now a punishable offense. So stay out of California with your 2000 Land Rover, Carrie.

    http://www.latimes.com/news/local/la-me-bicycle-law-20110721,0,3219222.story

  • Chris

    Honey, you’re way cuter when you just keep your mouth shut. When you open it, you tend to look dumb.

  • bruce

    Oh, Philly Suburbs Mag, keep up the great work promoting fear and stereotypes in Jersey.

    What color is that Discovery, btw?

  • Rumplestilskin

    I live in rural Bucks County and bicyclists(NOT BIKERS) are just as rude, arrogant, and disrespectful of traffic signs, traffic signals and pedestrians there as they are in Philly. Friend of my wife, standing on a rural road to take a picture was hit by a bicyclist( Dr. FROM NYC) who ignored a “walk bikes thru bridge” sign at a covered bridge near New Hope and hit her at about 30 MPH which resulted in both of them going to the hospital. Bicyclists should be licensed and forced to carry insurance….then they might start obeying the traffic regulations. Motorcyclists(BIKERS) are required to do so…..why not bicyclists?? They are using the public roadways that drivers and BIKERS are paying gasoline taxes, and PennDOT fees to maintain.

  • Fred

    Rump,

    I have insurance. The person that pulled a hit and run on a neighbor of mine, leaving him dead on the side of the road likely didn’t.

    We all pay the same taxes as you do so get off your high horse.

  • Kate

    I was being genuine. I liked your post…jeesh! haha

  • kate

    other kate- i’m pretty sure adam was talking to me and not to you when he said “thank you”. also you should probably check your own grammar before you attack megan. it’s full of sentence fragments, misplaced punctuation, and made up words. if you’re going to be a stickler about grammar then you’ve got to stick to it yourself!

  • kate

    Rumplestilskin-

    are you honestly comparing a bicycle to a motorcycle a valid reason for cyclists to carry insurance? i can tell you, if your doctor friend was hit by a motorcycle rather than a bike they would be dead.

  • Rumplestilskin

    Kate, Yes I am comparing it to any other vehicle on the public roadway. The physics of impact are the same. P=M*V ( Force = Mass times Velocity) I don’t condone hit and run by anyone.

    Fred Bicyclists are NOT paying gas taxes or PENNDOT license and registration fees last time I looked…..so get your facts straight.

    If you want to use the roadways, follow the rules of the road….very simple. #1 KEEP TO THE RIGHT, # 2 OBEY all traffic signs and traffic control devices #3 Do not operate your vehicle in a careless or reckless manner. Common sense with or without a motor.

  • horrified.

    This whole article is sickening. Just yesterday, I was on my bicycle sitting at a red light on 20th WAITING for my turn to cross over Walnut Street and continue on my way to work. My light turns green, so I proceed to go but just as I do, a car comes barreling down walnut to make an illegal right turn on red… clearly he thought he could make the YELLOW light and clearly he did not. After he almost managed to hit me and saw that I was CLEARLY frustrated – he smirks and laughs at me – all of which I can see in his side mirror. Then he even had the balls to scream out the window “guess youre one of those bikers ive been hearing about on the news”…

    It’s articles like this that fuel idiots like that. I was NEVER in the wrong during that situation – yet somehow it was my fault simply because I ride one two wheels and not four?

    Carrie – I’m sorry your gas guzzling Landrover is too large to fit down the small streets of Philly, and that you have to compensate for that by blaming cyclists, however you have NEVER ridden a bike in the city. How can you begin to talk about something in which you have no clue of? I laugh at the fact that you seem think it’s ok to act like we are second class citizens, because we have two wheels and it doesn’t cost us $100 to fill our tanks. Maybe its time for you to move out to the Main Line where you can freely drive around in your SUV and uggs, safe and sound from all of us scary, terrible cyclists.

  • horrified.

    PS. – Does Carrie even live in the city?

    AND Rumplestilskin – we pay city taxes, just like you. I assume that’s what Fred meant when he said that.

    Requiring bicyclists to get a license and insurance is ridiculous. That would mean that even a four year old learning to ride his or her bike would be required to be licensed and fully insured to ride around his parents cul-de-sac? Or do you get to pick and chose who is licensed and who isnt?

  • Another blonde

    bleach damages girls’ brains =) thats why i use non-bleach dyes haha =)
    anyway, the article is trash, one sided trash in favore of ignorant drivers.
    I am a driver myself, not a cyclist (too afraid to ride a bike in the city), and I dislike azholes on a road, not cyclist or drivers or even pedestrians. Its not about being one or another, its about being polite and knowing how to share the road. We are all in this together.

  • kate

    R-

    i don’t condone a hit and run by anyone on anything but a bicycle will never be able to go the same speed as a motorcycle. it’s just a fact. the average non-cyclist adult on a multi-speed bike will maybe average 9-12 mph as an easy pace. average sport or training cyclists on good road bikes usually average between 14-15 mph. serious cyclists who train for distance rides consider 15-18 mph their average speed on a bike ride (obviously not a race or competition but in reference to a leisurely ride). now, i know the chances of the person who hit your friend being a professional cyclist are slim but giving them the benefit of the doubt the average speed they were probably going was between 15-18 mph on a bike that probably weighed around 15 lbs. or less. yes, if someone biked into you it would hurt but it would not be comparable to a motorcycle going at least 25-30 mph at the slowest (keep in mind that people usually buy motorcycles to cruise extremely slow) weighing in at an average of between 600 and 800 lbs. you can obviously see that a MOTORcycle would do far more damage to a body than a bicycle.

  • Adam

    After much consideration after my comment, I feel as if I owe an apology to Ms. Carrie Denny. I shouldn’t have called-names like a child and you were undeserved of those names I called you.

    Though I apologize for being an asshole, I do not apologize or agree with your article. Even if you don’t know the severe harm it could cause to the Philadelphia public, even if in your mind it is a tongue in cheek reference to a thought process a lot of your peers possess…it is still reckless.

    There are reckless cyclists just as there are reckless drivers. The main difference: when a reckless cyclists acts recklessly and runs into a car…the car doesn’t die. When a reckless motorists runs into a cyclists, chances are that cyclists life will be ended if not majorly impacted for the rest of their life.

    One part of me believes you wrote this article to stir the hypothetical pot and if you are attempting to be a credible journalist, than you have failed. Do not follow in Michael Smith or Tony Kornheiser’s footsteps, what they do is not journalism. Albeit it provided them some time in the limelight is it deserved time in said limelight?

    I really don’t think that you have any idea of how hot the pot you are stirring is boiling. I urge you to step into a cyclists shoes and see how it feels.

    Good luck and I hope that you make better choices with your career in the future.

    Best,

  • Jimmy John

    LOL, you mad at cyclists girl? I bet you are fat as shit!

  • Ryan

    This article is hatefully and absolutely absurd. You all should be ashamed.

  • oh and…

    Do you even actually drive in Philly? For every one asshole idiot on a bike there are at least 10 asshole idiots behind the wheel of a massive automobile. Just riding to two blocks down the street, I saw at least 5 different drivers do things that would be considered dangerous. RARELY are those drivers, especially in Center City, ever given a ticket or a warning. They blow through just turned red-lights, pull out (or in) of parking spaces with no care for those around them, make illegal turns, pull across two lanes of traffic to make a turn, they DONT use turn signals.. and the list goes on. Oh, they speed and weave throughout traffic just like these cyclists you complain so much about. Stop blaming cyclists when drivers are just as, if not more, worse than they are.

  • Driver & cyclist

    I’m an avid cyclist but drive around the city each day for work. I have never once had a dangerous or poor experience with a cyclist. Sure, I’ve seen cyclists ride closely next to my car or jut into my lane to pass another cyclist, avoid a pot hole, etc but it doesn’t put either of us in danger- so why get upset? If a cyclist is in my lane bc they don’t have a bike lane, I don’t get upset because chances are we’re going to reach a red light or stop sign soon & it’s pointless to get upset. Why are you in such a rush, in a city full of speed limits, stop signs & red lights that you need a cyclist to get the hell out of your way? I don’t think anyone, besides cops, firemen or paramedics should be in that big of a rush. Chill, get that road rage in check, stop thinking you’re better than everyone (that’s the only reason you mentioned the make/model of your car right?) and buy a bike.

  • megan

    At least one of the “kate’s” is intelligent. It’s pretty obvious which one’s been huffing her gasoline too much. You’re such a badass for hating, we’re all really impressed. I bet you’re super B.A. rocking out to your Carrie Underwood in your Ugg’s while cursing cyclists in mommy and daddy’s x-mas present to you! HOW’S THAT FOR JUDGEMENT? Here’s a tip: YOU CAN’T BULLSHIT, A BULLSHITTER.

  • Jon L

    Wow…..instigating violence towards bikers (or anyone)….super classy. Unfortunately, the author of this article, along with a slew of commentators, lack the 2nd grade level of comprehension to allow ANY progress in the epic car vs. bike commuter battle.

    I bike to and from work every day. I also own a car, which I drive regularly. When biking down spruce, and then 13th (who’s bike lane might as well be non existent), I am CONSTANTLY dodging cars swerving into the bike lane, or just stopping their cars there. This forces me to a) run into you head on, or b) exit the bike lane, OUR lane, and enter the car lane YOUR lane, to avoid certain doom.

    STAY OUT OF OUR LANE. If there’s a car stopped in front of you. Tough. YOU chose to drive today. Do NOT endanger (and enrage) me by taking the liberty to move your 2 ton vehicle into my 5 foot wide lane.

    That being said, I’ve had plenty of bad experiences when driving, HOWEVER, 99% of them were caused by the “bike messengers” flying carelessly down bobbing and weaving through cars that could flatten them in one foul swoop. I get it. Riding fast is cool, it makes you look cool. Being squashed by a bus because you were riding like an idiot…..not so cool. So use your damn heads.

    There needs to be stronger enforcement on automobiles carelessly disregarding bike lanes, and a total crackdown on bikers who disregard the fact that they too are considered vehicles, and therefore bound to the city’s laws.

  • Jason

    There are a lot of people on here that say that people that own bicycles and cycle throughout the city should be considered vehicles on the road that should abide by all traffic laws.

    But then, even in the original article, it is known that the majority of the streets of philadelphia don’t have their own bike lane…causing bicycles and cars to share the road…

    …with me so far…ok good…

    now…let’s say those bicyclists that have to ride on a “cars” road weaved in between cars to get to the front when everyones parked at a red light. there are motorists commenting saying that “this is outrageous and they need to follow the rules!”…right?

    ok…so lets change it. now instead of weaving in between cars to get to the front…they don’t. they stay exactly where they are in the lineup and wait for the light to turn green like everyone else. when that light does turn green, all the vehicles on the road (cars and bikes alike) will begin to accelerate. since a cyclist accelerates at a MUCH slower pace than a car, all cars behind that cyclist would therefore have to go at that cyclists slow speed. Doesn’t any motorist out there believe that this would cause MORE frustration among drivers instead of less?

    Share the road. That’s all that needs to be said. There are no cyclists out there looking to piss off drivers…they are just trying to get to where they need to go. Why is it a big deal to a driver to see a cyclist peddle past them through the stop sign and red light? isn’t that the cyclist risking his/her own safety? doesn’t that not even concern you? if a car hits a bike…the cars going to be fine.

  • Kate

    Megan-

    Judgment is spelled with one ‘e’.

  • megan

    Kate,

    Thanks for the help. I’m not very bright. I love LAND ROVERS!!!!

  • Megan

    Kate, Did CCP teach you that?

    And LOL at the fake me, nice try…sikkkkkkeeeee

    Eat dicks.

  • megan

    Megan,

    You could not be any dumber

    Love,
    Megan

  • Anthony

    Seriously, Megan, shut up. You sound like a fool. Did you ever have an argument in the first place? Get a life.

  • brian payne

    the problem is the state in their infinite wisdom has given cyclists equal rights with cars, cars weigh a lot (depending on the make), bikes weigh almost nothing. i think you can all imagine what would happen if a bike got in the way of my pickup truck. lets say that a bike weighs 25 lbs total (lets just say). 25 lbs vs. 2 and half tons? wonder who wins. the state has to see what they have done. they have given bike riders NO FEAR all because now, bicycle riders have the same rights (to the road) as a person driving a car. its time to reinstill fear in these people, make them understand if you ride a bicycle in traffic, you WILL get run over, and take away the punishment you have installed.

  • mike

    whenever possible bike lanes are used by cyclist. that doesnt mean thats the only place we are allowed to ride. this article sends a really negative message. we all just need to be kind to each other and share the road.

  • stephen reingold

    are you friggin crazy? why would anyone know the humm of your SUV in a city setting? maybe take it in for a tune up or slow down fool!!!

  • nick

    just two weekends ago, i was riding down spring garden IN the bike lane and a mini-van sped up from behind me, cut me off to attempt to pull into a parking spot. i was left with 3 options: run into the side of the van, run into the back of the car he was pulling behind, try to jump the curb… all while going about 20mph. i opted to jump the curb and was left with multiple bruises, cuts, scrapes and a bent back wheel. you know what he did? he saw that i had wrecked and sped off. that parking spot was no longer important to him. if he had waited literally another 1 to 2 seconds, everything would have been peachy.

    if that had been your land rover, i’m sure you would have done the same thing. motorists can go fuck themselves. go back to the mainline.

  • nick

    truth be told, there’s no solid reason for people to drive a lot in the city.

    walk. take septa. bike.

    we wouldn’t be the fattest/ugliest city in america if that happened.

  • James

    Over the past 20yrs I have done plenty of driving and cycling in Center City. With the exception of cyclists who ride the wrong way on one way streets, I’ve never had a problem with cyclists. When cycling I’ve had plenty of problems with cars: turning at or in front of me without looking or signalling, attempting to pass me when there’s no room to pass, diving in front of me then slamming on their brakes without looking or signalling. Drivers in this region have always been very hostile towards cyclists. It has improved considerably in the past few years as driving has decreased and cycling increased. This irresponsible posting is a big step backwards. Cyclists have an *equal* right to road, If you are menacing cyclists merely because they are in front of you and you would like to go faster, you are part of the problem. Do you also tailgate and harass drivers of small slow cars, scooter riders, and pedestrians who are in front of your SUV’s front fender? Cycling is the fastest and most convenient way to get around town. Cars use is declining. Get used to it and accept it or get a bike and enjoy its many benefits.

  • Pamela

    Unbelievable. this post has changed my entire view of PhillyMag. I get it now and am completely disgusted. CARRIE, you should feel super free to move to a city that was built around automotive use (try LA). philly does not have time to coddle your bullshit, entitled, SUV-loving behaviors or attitude.

  • naw

    Carrie,

    Did you ever think these bikers are about twice as smart as your dumb as driving around your Land Rover Discovery?

    Let’s see here…
    I ride my bike to work for free.
    You drive your big ass discovery to work for… not free.

    I think your on your way to being one of the most hated in the tri-state area.

  • Veloise

    Glad I don’t live, nor ride, in the “city of brotherly love.” So much for the tourism dollar!

  • http://www.ohiobikelawyer.com Steve Magas

    As one who has handled some 300 “bike cases” involving bike/car crashes, I couldn’t disagree more with the arrogant, snotty tone of the writer here.

    While there are certainly good and bad cyclists,as well as good and bad motorists, the writer’s view that scare tactics from behind the wheel of a Land Rover are what pass for “good” driving, or legitimate commentary, is sick.

    Cyclists have the right to ride on the roads – they developed this right in the 1880s, before cars were in existence, and have fought to preserve this right ever since.

    Cyclists should be policed like anyone else using the roads. Cops SHOULD ticket scofflaw cyclists, just as they ticket scofflaw motorists. This ticketing is what makes the Traffic Rules work – if nobody gets ticketed, and doesn’t have to pay a fine for bad driving of a car or a bike, then scofflawdom abounds…

    Statistically, cycling has never been safer. Traffic deaths are DOWN almost 40% from a high of 1003 in 1975 to 630 in 2009 on a national basis.

    However, motorist/cyclist TENSION is up up up… There are more motorists than ever, driving over roughly the same roads their parents drove on 30 yrs ago, so traffic density is also up up up. However, urban cycling is on the uptick, more and more cyclists are taking the road, and motorist anger continues to boil… I wish there was something to say other than GET OVER IT – but there really isn’t…

    EDUCATION is the key – The lesson for motorists is that cyclists have the right to ride on the road … the lesson for cyclists is to ride lawfully, intelligently, conspicuously and predictably.

    This “Share The Road” concept is based on a bogus premise. There is nothing to “share.” A cyclist lawfully riding down the road has EXACTLY AND PRECISELY the same “right of way” as one who chooses to drive a car, truck, bus or scooter down the road… bigger vehicles don’t get bigger rights.

    The cyclist does NOT have to “share” the right of way and the motorist behind the cyclist has nothing to share – the motorist must, under the law, respect the right of way which the cyclist possesses….even if that means,shockingly to some motorists, slowing down for a few seconds…

    So, cyclists RIDE RIDE RIDE – the more we ride, the safer things will be! Ride Legally. Know your rights and assert them! The system CAN work!

    Steve Magas

  • Jon

    Stay classy babe.

  • http://crucialbrutal.com/ JimmyAwesome

    “The Boyfriend says that bikers throughout the city of Philadelphia know well the hum of my 2000 Land Rover Discovery.” It’s amazing that you probably proof read that sentence many times and said “yes…this sounds properly douchey. PRINT!”

  • http://phillymag.com Hipster Cyclist

    Does Philly mag actually PAY this woman to write for them? This piece is awful. All it made me want to do is KEY a bunch of SUVs. Obviously barbie has never been on a bike, or she’d know that clipping even one side view mirror is enough to knock someone off a bike, let alone riding down a sidestreet hitting them all. It’s clear she just likes making stuff up and I have to be honest, all this article makes me want to do is go ride my bike through center city.

  • kate

    “Kate”-

    you’re a fucking idiot and your grammar sucks. that’s why i find it hilarious that you keep correcting megan. it’s the blind leading the blind.

    ps- read a book! i was gonna say eat a dick but i think reading a book might benefit you.

  • Eric

    Note to self: Never go to philidelphia, and if i ever see a blond driving a landrover piss her off as much as possible, from my car….

  • Jason

    Guess what I found…

    cdenny@phillymag.com

    That’s our writers email address. I already sent here a personal letter of my disgust. I hope all of you do the same.

  • Carrie S.

    While there are many problems with the way this author presents her argument, to be fair, the cyclists in Philly tend to live on the edge. I know – I used to be among them.

    I learned to ride in traffic in Philadelphia, where I commuted for about two years before I realized my mistakes. I had patterned my own riding style after that of others. It’s no exaggeration to say that the number of law-abiding cyclists in that city are next to none.

    For the next three years, I rode with a more careful understanding of my rights and my responsibility on the road. But I had even more trouble from motorists as a law-abiding rider, simply because they assumed I was just like all the cyclists, so I must be in the wrong. I was hit by two cars without even so much as an apology when I was riding in the bike lane. Turning vehicles just figured I was supposed to stop for them as they swung in front of me to park. Instead, curses and fist shakes were my reward for being in their way.

    I just came back from a visit to Philly two days ago. The number of cyclists has shot up – I’d say there were nearly double the number of cyclists on the roads as there were when I left the city two years ago. It was shocking how many more of us there were. And as I waited patiently behind the buses at the traffic light, numerous cyclists zoomed between the cars on the left and the bus in front of me. This is par for the course in Philly. Not a single cyclist stayed to the right of the road during my entire stay, unless they were on one of the bike lane roads (If they weren’t riding the WRONG way on the bike lane).

    When you’re on a bicycle, it’s challenging to get exercise when you’re stuck behind a line of traffic. And right in the line of exhaust fumes. It almost doesn’t seem fair to be on a slower-moving vehicle only to be forced to move even slower still.

    During my visit this time, I did my time on the non-bike lane roads in order to get to the bike lanes, and once I reached them, my grip on the handlebars loosened. It was a relief to ride where I felt the cars really were more considerate of my place on the road. I am not an across-the-board proponent for bike lanes, but in Philly’s case, I’d say they are worth it. Not the answer to the issue, but there is potential.

    Anyway, this driver’s lament is hard to really understand if you have never driven/rode a bike in Philly. A tiny part of me is glad the cyclists got ticketed, though I really hope all of the tickets were doled out for valid traffic fallacies and not just tickets to prove a point as apart of a larger crackdown on cyclists. It seems like an intelligent person such as myself would be able to figure this out on my own right away, but it was not as intuitive as one would imagine it should be, based on the overall traffic patterns of the city.

    That being said, many motorists in that city don’t make it easy for the cyclists. I’ve had countless incidents with motorists, who really do believe that cyclists do not belong on the roads. Others have gone out of their way to scare or even hurt cyclists in a sordid attempt to correct a cyclist’s unlawful behavior. It could be leftover rage from prior incidents with smart-ass cyclists – and boy there are plenty of them. But if this doesn’t seem inhumane, such as someone who commented to this post with a hope to see cyclists hit by a bus, then we have bigger issues than traffic concerns. After all – there are all kinds of things motorists need to be cautious of when they are driving, and when I look over at motorists who are reading the paper in traffic, or talking on the phone, or whatever, it’s difficult to give them the benefit of the doubt. Many cyclists are not in the right, but drivers are in a position to pay better attention to the traffic than many of them do. Just because traffic is bumper-to-bumper is not a signal that it’s a good time to catch up on email. If you’re that busy, SEPTA might be a better option.

    Driving any vehicle in the city is not fun for anyone. It requires a great deal of patience that is sparse when you are expected to be somewhere. It may be asking too much for city dwellers to find patience while operating a vehicle, motorized or non, but it is necessary to help to quell some of this deep-seated aggression. Understanding also goes a long way. After accidentally blowing through a stop sign that was partially hidden from my view, I caught up with the driver and apologized. “No big deal,” he said, and meant it.

  • Carrie S.

    While there are many problems with the way this author presents her argument, to be fair, the cyclists in Philly tend to live on the edge. I know – I used to be among them.

    I learned to ride in traffic in Philadelphia, where I commuted for about two years before I realized my mistakes. I had patterned my own riding style after that of others. It’s no exaggeration to say that the number of law-abiding cyclists in that city are next to none.

    For the next three years, I rode with a more careful understanding of my rights and my responsibility on the road. But I had even more trouble from motorists as a law-abiding rider, simply because they assumed I was just like all the cyclists, so I must be in the wrong. I was hit by two cars without even so much as an apology when I was riding in the bike lane. Turning vehicles just figured I was supposed to stop for them as they swung in front of me to park. Instead, curses and fist shakes were my reward for being in their way.

    I just came back from a visit to Philly two days ago. The number of cyclists has shot up – I’d say there were nearly double the number of cyclists on the roads as there were when I left the city two years ago. It was shocking how many more of us there were. And as I waited patiently behind the buses at the traffic light, numerous cyclists zoomed between the cars on the left and the bus in front of me. This is par for the course in Philly. Not a single cyclist stayed to the right of the road during my entire stay, unless they were on one of the bike lane roads (If they weren’t riding the WRONG way on the bike lane).

    When you’re on a bicycle, it’s challenging to get exercise when you’re stuck behind a line of traffic. And right in the line of exhaust fumes. It almost doesn’t seem fair to be on a slower-moving vehicle only to be forced to move even slower still.

    During my visit this time, I did my time on the non-bike lane roads in order to get to the bike lanes, and once I reached them, my grip on the handlebars loosened. It was a relief to ride where I felt the cars really were more considerate of my place on the road. I am not an across-the-board proponent for bike lanes, but in Philly’s case, I’d say they are worth it. Not the answer to the issue, but there is potential.

    Anyway, this driver’s lament is hard to really understand if you have never driven/rode a bike in Philly. A tiny part of me is glad the cyclists got ticketed, though I really hope all of the tickets were doled out for valid traffic fallacies and not just tickets to prove a point as apart of a larger crackdown on cyclists. It seems like an intelligent person such as myself would be able to figure this out on my own right away, but it was not as intuitive as one would imagine it should be, based on the overall traffic patterns of the city.

    That being said, many motorists in that city don’t make it easy for the cyclists. I think a lot of the issues they have with cyclists began with their attitudes, and have resulted in a lot of ill-will that cause cyclists to lash out in the ways they do. I’ve had countless incidents with motorists, who really do believe that cyclists do not belong on the roads. Others have gone out of their way to scare or even hurt cyclists in a sordid attempt to correct a cyclist’s unlawful behavior. It could be leftover rage from prior incidents with smart-ass cyclists – and boy there are plenty of them. But if this doesn’t seem inhumane, such as someone who commented to this post with a hope to see cyclists hit by a bus, then we have bigger issues than traffic concerns. After all – there are all kinds of things motorists need to be cautious of when they are driving, and when I look over at motorists who are reading the paper in traffic, or talking on the phone, or whatever, it’s difficult to give them the benefit of the doubt. Many cyclists are not in the right, but drivers are in a position to pay better attention to the traffic than many of them do. Just because traffic is bumper-to-bumper is not a signal that it’s a good time to catch up on email. If you’re that busy, SEPTA might be a better option.

    Driving any vehicle in the city is not fun for anyone. It requires a great deal of patience that is sparse when you are expected to be somewhere. It may be asking too much for city dwellers to find patience while operating a vehicle, motorized or non, but it is necessary to help to quell some of this deep-seated aggression. Understanding also goes a long way. After accidentally blowing through a stop sign that was partially hidden from my view, I caught up with the driver and apologized. “No big deal,” he said, and meant it.

  • Dan

    I challenge you to bike around the city for a month – I know several girls who bike around in heels. Just think of how much faster you will be able to shop, not looking around for parking. You might like it, and stylish clothes are useless without a body on which to hang them. Next time your boyfriend with a capitol B criticizes your driving, don’t take it out on us. :) Knowing the full year, make and model of your car, we know that you can transport a bike to a suitably non-scary place and ride from there – no excuse. :)

    To all the other posters, I disagree that Philly is full of angry drivers. I been biking to work for 8 years, and have only been honked and a handful of times and of course been told to get on the sidewalk by a few hilarious people. Dude, something happened that you didn’t expect, you were startled, it’s ok. Bike / drive with your head up Philly!

  • James

    I cant believe she is paid to write hate articles that are factually incorrect. Waa….I am cancelling my phillymag subscription right away and applying there for a job

    Then may be I can get paid to write a hate article against her.

  • Ken

    When gasoline is $8.00/gallon, we’ll still be smiling and pedaling and you’ll be angrier than ever.
    We’ll vote for carbon tax, gas tax, toll roads parking restrictions and promote sky-high insurance rates and lowered speed limits. Sadly, there will be more deaths and injuries but I guess that’s the cost of freedom.

  • http://www.thisgirlisabimbo.com Kirk

    Your assumptions are really great, lady. we’re all hipsters, and you’re all GREAT drivers! we all go the speed limit, and you driver probably all obey every yellow light, stop sigh, yield sign, and NO TURN ON RED or NO TURN ON RED signs ever…. right?

    I wish I had a camera for every car that cut me off, made me switch lanes, or just made me fuggin unsafe in front of them. you seriously have to be the most weird, bimbo-ish, uninformed person in Philly. You ride a bike around the city and think it’s a great idea? Well… don’t… stick to your car. please.

  • Joe

    Oh my god I know! cyclists are so crazy in the city. The only thing I can think of worse then that………..is an un-intelligent, un-educated blond with a computer and something to say. You are a discrace to Journalism in Philadelphia. Opinons are for quacks.