GIRL TALK: Karmin Raps About Their New Album, Tiffs With L.A. Reid and More

karmin band

On Friday, vocalist Amy Heidemann and (ooh-la-la) pianist Nick Noonan, better known as sassy pop duo Karmin, are coming to the TLA to perform tracks from their first studio album, Pulses. I called them up this week to chat about what they’ll be doing in Philly, the tiff with their label that kept delaying the album release, and how the lovebirds manage to keep from strangling each other after having to work together every day.




Amy Heidemann

Amy.

 G Philly: Congrats on the new record. I'm always interested in the creative process behind new music. What was it like putting together Pulses?
Amy Heidemann: Everyday leading up to this record was a learning curve for us. We were excited in the beginning, with our success on YouTube, then putting out our EP, then the success of "Brokenhearted," which still blows us away. Those things really helped have a part in the new record. We put everything we have learned throughout the past few years into the new material.

GP: Why did you call the album Pulses?
AH: It was really an all-hands-on-deck kind of project. It was tough to put out and it definitely had its own heartbeat during the process. There is also so much energy throughout the record. The whole album has a strong pulse and you can really feel it throughout.

GP: It was tough to put out? What was the problem?
Nick Noonan: Just getting it out! We had a love-hate relationship with our label [Epic] during the process. It is really tough to hear so many songs you've recorded and fallen in love with and know you can't do anything with them, because all parties involved need to agree with putting out the right single at the right time.
A: That was tough. We were so passionate about the songs and the album that it was hard when everyone wasn't on the same page. ... There really is a lot of emotional intensity that comes from working with a label and putting out new music. Everyone involved with the process is emotionally invested in what they do.

GP: So how are things with Epic now?
NN: Things are good. I mean, we bitch about the label, but we love L.A. Reid. It's tough to get that balance between creativity and business. We are all on the same page now, which is great.

GP: I know you guys are huge supporters of the LGBT community. What are your hopes for the gay-rights movement in 2014?

Nick.

Nick.

NN: That's a no-brainer. Civil rights for all! We still don't understand why it is even an issue. America is ready for equality.
AH: Really, it is time. We love the LGBT community. We really would be nothing without them and we are so excited to be a part of all the tables turning for equality. It means so much to us.

GP: It must be interesting working with your partner every day. What's one thing that drives you crazy about each other?
NN: Um ... I think we're out of time for that one. [Laughs] I think I can speak for Amy when I say that she is always 10 minutes early to things while I'm the one who's late. She is super neat, and organized which is also something I'm not.
AH: Yeah, we are opposites when it comes to certain things. However, we are both left-handed and our birthdays are two days apart. All our quirks work themselves out in the studio and when we are performing.

GP: Have you ever gotten into a tiff before you hit the stage?
NN: Totally. But when that does happen right before we perform we just work out all our disagreements through the music and our performance.
AH: When we perform it kind of gives us a clean slate, and the disagreements go away. It really is all about the energy and the music we put out. It helps us get through everything.

GP: Before we go, I have to ask what you'll be doing while you're in Philly?
NN: We may grab a cheesesteak. Check out a few local bars. We have some friends here that we are going to see, as well. We are very excited, Philly is dope, man.

Karmin comes to the TLA on Fri., Jan. 31. For tickets go here

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