Del. Attorney Champions Employees’ Right to Post NSFW Photos

Brian Zulberti Delaware

In July I chatted with Brian Zulberti, the Delaware lawyer who went viral for a few days after applying to jobs with a sexy, sleeveless photo. During our discussion, he told me that he’s “much more interested in pursuing a job in the law than a job in pornography. Although, I think it should be perfectly OK if I wanted to pursue a job in both simultaneously.” Well, today, Jezebel reports that he just may be trying to dip into both fields by dedicating himself to a new movement: advocating for people who get fired from their jobs for posting risqué photos on social media.

He’s created a website, where he posts NSFW (!) photos of himself with blush-worthy captions like, “Maybe I should be a defense lawyer, because I definitely don’t mind a hung jury.” (Squirm.) And he just sent out this email to lawyers around Delaware:

I contact you asking for your support in an important social cause, albeit a controversial one. Here in Delaware, attorneys have a tendency to tout themselves as paradigms of legal competence, candor, and professionalism. What better distinguished body to take the forefront and speak out against the tidal wave of social media firings that is unjustly obliterating competent and driven employees from coast to coast.

The problem is simple. Americans everywhere, especially professionals such as ourselves, are being fired for posting things through social media that are completely legal and have no tangible relevance whatsoever to their performance at work. The result has been the rise of the nonsensical belief that employers have the right to deem all of their employees as the “face of the company” during every waking moment of their lives. The further result is that each and every one of us, as attorneys, is faced with the decision to either fit into the expectations of how we behave in our private lives, or face the very real specter of devastating workplace consequences.

This is wrong, and I have been working full time since the end of July, thanks in large part to generous donations from supporters and fans, to draw attention to this movement.

What on Earth is this guy thinking?!




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  • Ari Sunshine Himber

    Brian’s thinking is a logical, perfectly understandable critique of a legitimate social issue. You’re pointing and saying “This makes me uncomfortable.” Great journalism. Bravo.

  • Cole Mickens

    “”What on Earth is this guy thinking?!””

    That what he does in his free time is independent of his job and his job performance?

  • Employer

    If he’s paid to make widgets and flashing his schlong in public doesn’t impact his ability to do a great job of making widgets, his employment status shouldn’t be threatened.

    If he’s paid to exercise good judgment or to have the appearance of exercising good judgment, then public schlong waving should be considered a threat to ones employment status.

    Schlong waving may be considered poor judgment by some.