Today’s Prop 8 Case: Ways to Be a Part of the Action

From rallying on the steps of the Supreme Court to finding an audio recording of the transcript, there are lots of ways to be involved in today’s history-making decision.

Washington D.C. is buzzing with excitement today. As I type, the nine Supreme Court judges are listening to arguments in the Hollingsworth v. Perry case (aka Proposition 8). Their quest? To determine if the California amendment that stripped gay couples of the right to marry violates the state’s constitution. If the court decides to overturn Prop 8, there could be a variety of outcomes, the very best of which would be invalidating constitutional provisions and statues against gay marriage in all states. In short: This is a major day in gay history not just for Californians, but for all of us.

If you weren’t one of the 400 lucky ones to grab a seat in the courtroom, there are still ways to tune in and be a part of the movement. The United for Marriage coalition has organized buses from several cities to transport people to the steps of the Supreme Court, where there are rallies and lower-key gatherings scheduled throughout the next two days. For more information, visit lightofjustice.org.

For those who can’t make it to D.C. and want to hear or read every word of the proceedings, there will be an audio recording and transcript available at supremecourt.gov. For audio, which will be released around 1 p.m. today, click HERE, and for the transcript click HERE. For an insightful response to the recording, follow Andrew Sullivan on The Dish. He’ll be live-blogging as he listens to the oral arguments.

To stay on top of the coverage, you could just open your computer or turn on your TV — there will be reports all over the place. One of my favorites is LGBTQ Nation, which has put together a comprehensive guide about who and what to watch for in the Prop 8 and tomorrow’s DOMA cases. It lays out all the facts — from the names of petitioners bringing the appeal to a brief refresher course on the history of each case.

And, of course, G Philly will be monitoring activity all day and reporting any major moments right here. So be sure to check back and follow our Facebook and Twitter feeds for updates. Happy history-making!

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