DIY Down The Shore: Phoebe Esmon’s Rickey

emmanuelle-interiorTo help your summer along, Foobooz plans to give you some recipes by notable chefs and bartenders in Philadelphia. We’re calling it the DIY Down the Shore series, and we’ll be posting them all week. We’re bringing Philly’s dining scene into your summer homes.

Phoebe Esmon, of Emmanuelle is one of this city’s great bartenders. She not only makes beautiful cocktails done right, but she’s well educated in what she does. So here’s a little schoolin’ from Ms. Esmon:

One of my favorite hot weather drinks is a Rickey. The Rickey was invented in 1883 by Shoomakers’ (Washington D.C.) bartender George A. Williamson. Inspired by “Colonel” Joe Rickey, he mixed up this tall sugarless refresher to ward off the oppressive heat that is Washington D.C. in the summer. This cocktail also proves that simplicity can be a beautiful thing. This preparation can be made with your choice of spirit. You mostly see it made with a London Dry Gin, but I prefer mine with Genever. Genever, also known as “Dutch Courage” is the great-grandfather of gin, and is maltier and less juniper-forward than its English cousin. It tastes kind of like the love child a London Dry Gin and your favorite Irish whiskey.

Rickey

1 whole lime
2 oz Genever (or the spirit of your choice)
Sparkling water
(the original recipe calls for Apollinaris water, but you can use your favorite mineral water or club soda. The smaller bubbles and higher mineral content of Apollinaris, lend it a crémant-like effervescence.)

In a tall glass: Squeeze the lime. Drop in one of the husks. Add the Genever, sparkling water and ice. Give it a brief stir to mix, insert straw and enjoy.




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