Two Cherry Hill Restaurants Close

mccormick-schmick-cherry-hill-940

The McCormick and Schmick’s and adjacent William Douglas Steakhouse have closed at the Marketplace in Cherry Hill (Where the Wegmans is located). The restaurants are two of the fourteen eateries in the complex. The remaining restaurants range from Five Guys to the country’s largest Houlihan’s.

The Courier Post has the details on closures as well as how some restaurants in Cherry Hill share liquor licenses because they are so expensive.




Pair of Cherry Hill chain restaurants close [Courier Post]

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  • buzzbye

    More businesses are closing than opening on a 2 to 1 ratio right now in America. You have not seen anything yet people believe me. The worse is yet to come. Much way much worse is about to happen

  • Richard Colton

    William Douglas will be next. Way over priced and terrible service.

    • http://philadelphia.foobooz.com/ Art from Foobooz

      It closed at the same time as McCormick’s.

      • Richard Colton

        thanks Art.

  • crateish

    It’s Christie’s New Jersey. Why should we care in PA? Our economy will surge once Corbett is gone while NJ’s withers.

  • Boo-urns

    It’s ridiculous how much a liquor license can cost in NJ… no wonder we’re overrun with crappy chain restaurants, they’re the only ones who can afford to serve alcohol! And the good ol’ boy network will never allow things to change around here (plus the folks who were suckered into spending a king’s ransom for a license would be up in arms).

    A liquor license should be a nominal fee (possibly once, possibly annual) to the state, not a piece of property that someone can own. And tying the number of licenses available in each town to population is also absurd: if a small town of 15,000 people wants to have ten bars, that shouldn’t be Trenton’s decision to make. The town should be allowed to set their own limits on the number, and those places pay their licensing fees to the state. This is how it works in most other states and it works just fine.

    I can’t even begin to list all the things that are wrong with NJ and how it’s run, but I can’t wait to get outta here. I’ll go somewhere else where the state actually wants its citizens to succeed and be prosperous.