Bocelli In Chestnut Hill

Bocelli
Elisa Ludwig heads to Chestnut Hill where she visits Bocelli to find whether the top of the Hill has a spot worth heading.

All of this would be forgivable were the food better than just average. And with a by-the-book straightforward menu like this one, the bar should be reasonably attainable. Mostly, though, the cooking is just not careful. The antipasto plate is a series of helpless vegetables cooked into mushy compliance: crumpling slices of grilled eggplant and melted squash and limp blades of roasted pepper, all swimming in more olive oil than your bread can soak up. The only things not half-dissolved are vaguely sweet carrots, a handful of olives and undercooked potato wedges. Meanwhile, perfectly good mushroom caps are crammed with a gummy filling of crabmeat, lumps of sausage, spinach and roasted pepper.

Uphill Battle [City Paper]
Bocelli [Official Site]

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  • Karen

    I appreciate the effort Elisa Ludwig made visiting Bocelli. But her geography is as wrong as her review. The restaurant located on Mount Pleasant (left off of Lincoln Drive) is in Mt. Airy. Bocelli is quaint and friendly. You are entering an Italian kitchen and get to watch the pasta being made to order, the gnocchi being dropped into the boiling water, and the relaxed comfort of good food and friends. While this neighborhood eatery is a staple for me and many of my Mount Airy neighbors, we are able to embrace a diversity of views on Bocelli and still make up our own minds.