Howie Roseman: Chip Kelly’s a ‘Trend-Setter’

As the Eagles’ brass introduced their new head coach Thursday afternoon, they wanted to make one thing clear: Chip Kelly was not being hired for his offensive scheme.

Since Kelly’s name first started to get linked to NFL head-coaching jobs, many have debated whether his spread-option attack would work at this level. But really, that is the wrong question.

It’s true that the Patriots chatted with Kelly about implementing a one-word no-huddle attack to push tempo. And it’s also true that quarterbacks like Robert Griffin III, Colin Kaepernick and Russell Wilson have had success running the option. But in the NFL, teams will adjust. Especially when they have a full offseason to look at the film and craft a plan.

Perhaps that’s why Jeffrey Lurie, Howie Roseman and company emphasized that they believe Kelly’s greatest strength will be his ability to figure out what’s coming next.

“He’s got an incredible way of thinking about things,” Roseman said. “When we looked at this and studied people who were great – and we had a great head coach – there were people who were out front on the edge of things, and then people are starting to copy. What we learned very quickly, Chip was a trend-setter. The things people were doing, they were following him. He wasn’t a disciple of anyone. People weren’t going, ‘Oh, Chip Kelly, he’s an offshoot of this person or that person.’ He was on the edge of it. And sometimes to find greatness, you’ve got to find the person who’s on top of that, and that’s what we’re trying to find.”

Of course, Kelly wasn’t the only candidate the Eagles targeted. Lurie and Roseman raved about Gus Bradley, who eventually took the Jacksonville Jaguars job. They also had great things to say about Penn State’s Bill O’Brien.

It had been 14 years since Lurie interviewed head-coaching candidates. This was an opportunity for him to pick the brains of some of the league’s top candidates.

“There are so many intriguing philosophies out there, in terms of how to operate an NFL team, that we just learned a tremendous amount, that we will share with Chip as well,” Lurie said. “There is a lot of innovative thought out there. I would have to say probably the most innovative thought on all these fronts was with Chip.”

Kelly might turn out to be the wrong choice, but it’s tough to find fault with how Lurie went about the process. He interviewed a variety of candidates – some from college, some current coordinators, some former NFL head coaches. He was looking for someone who had leadership and vision. And he eventually landed the guy who was at the top of his list.

He was also thinking long-term. Lurie’s first coach, Ray Rhodes, lasted four years. His second coach, Andy Reid, lasted 14. Lurie was patient with Reid, although certainly, a lot of that had to do with Reid’s success. With Kelly, Lurie’s not going to demand a quick turnaround. Kelly signed a five-year deal, and there’s no doubt he’s going to implement changes across the board.

Lurie seems committed to giving him time to get everything in place.

“I really think you’ve got to have somebody very sharp and who sees ahead of the curve, not just what’s happening right now,” Lurie said. “And doesn’t say, ‘Because that team is doing something well, we’re going to copy that team.’ That’s not what we were looking for. We were looking for somebody who is looking out 24 months, 36 months and saying, ‘How do we want to be?’ That’s much more what we’re looking for.”

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  • ICDogg

    Well, the Eagles are good at getting the guys they go after. The only question is, are they the right guys… time will tell.

    • Johngiam

      Exactly! It’s encouraging to see Roseman can get what he wants, now we have to see if he WANTS the correct guys

  • disqus_X1AA2XAOln

    At the end of the day, the process Lurie and company went through turned out to be a good one. They got the guy they wanted all along and also had the chance to glean insight and perspective from ten other would-be coaches.

    Whether you like the choice of Chip Kelly or not, you cannot logically say the Eagles process in finding their coach was as flawed as we all once thought. Seems just the opposite now.

    • http://twitter.com/PhiIs_Goodman Phils Goodman

      What do you mean “we”?

  • Absecon

    I think the question is more will Kelly hold-up long enough or will he burn out like Dick Vermeil’s first go-round?

  • http://twitter.com/PhiIs_Goodman Phils Goodman

    Y/N:

    Can Chip Kelly do more to threaten the defense with a QB who brings the zone read to the table than one who does not? I think that’s an obvious “Yes” answer, meaning the zone read is still a potentially relevant part of the equation when it comes to CK’s mesh of scheme and personnel for 2013.

    There are dozens of coaches if CFB who run the zone read, but none who did it as well as Chip Kelly coached teams. I don’t think that’s an element that should be thrown out the window so easily. It’s still an open question for his offense starting next year.

    My hunch is that there will be a QB battle in training camp between Nick Foles and another QB who can move well enough to pull off the zone read. I don’t know if this is a QB in the draft or one already in the pros, but I am starting to scan the college ranks for candidates in this year’s draft class.

    I would not be surprised to see the name Alex Carder get tied to the Eagles as we approach the draft. Carder is a 6’2″, 23-year-old senior quarterback out of Western Michigan with 4.6 speed and great accuracy, but available footage is scarce. WMU ran some limited zone read with Carder. Unfortunately, the only time WMU games reach a national audience is when they play big-time schools that grossly outmatch their athletic talent.

    These links shows all his plays against University of Michigan in 2011. This footage displays his arm much more than his legs. Try not to be influenced by the fact that WMU is getting whacked on the scoreboard.


    http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dv5uVEUpwSI

    Carder’s throwing motion seems a little bit unorthodox, but I am very impressed with his accuracy in that game action.

    Carder’s career rushing stats are not very impressive (285 attempts for 600 yards), but he has had good games on the ground (13 carries for 95 yards against Bowling Green and 13/66 against Ball State with 3 TDs). Obviously the Broncos did not run the zone read at nearly the same level that Oregon did, but Carder may have the tools to eat up yardage with his legs if Chip’s scheme causes part of the field to be left undefended.

    I think he might fit Kelly’s stated preference of a QB who can run, and I would be intrigued if the Eagles took a shot at him in a later round.

    Next I am going to look at EJ Manuel.

    • The Guru

      But if the zone read, which I’m going to call an NFL gimmick, is such a successful gameplan and offense, why didn’t Chip Kelly win with it on any level?

      • JofreyRice

        Kelly won a ton of games at Oregon, and that is clearly not a powerhouse program. The talent level of an Oregon star, like humiliated LB Casey Matthews, is nowhere near the big boys in the SEC.

        I have a lot of respect for D-coordinators in the league to adjust, but I hesitate to call read-option/zone read stuff a “gimmick” until it starts getting shut down week-in-week-out, like the Wildcat. Kaepernick’s threat to run on the read-option forced J. Abraham and Stephen Nicolas way up the field to prevent him from taking off, and let Gore run wild through the crease; not to mention, Atlanta had to commit their best pass rusher to making sure Kaepernick didn’t escape the pocket, rather than actually trying to get him on the ground. Though the defense is still what makes that team go, their offense is light years better than it was with Alex Smith.

        • The Guru

          A ton of games in the Pac-10 does not impress me. Spurrier, Saban and Erickson’s systems at least won college titles. Can’t say the same for Chip.

          But is the offense SF runs better because Kaepernick is an all around better player? Or because they employ a different scheme when he took over?

          • JofreyRice

            Saban’s working with far superior talent than anything Chip Kelly’s had, anywhere. I can’t say I’ve really studied Erickson’s run, as far as what he ran that was all that different, but “The U” in the early ’90s had a lot of high-caliber NFL talent. What Spurrier did at UF has absolutely created ripples in college football, in terms of more wide-open passing attacks. You can make a case that a lot of the Air Raid stuff in college comes out of his Fun n’ Gun system at Florida; guys like Bob Stoops, Mike Leach, Kevin Sumlin, Art Briles, Dana Holgorsen, all borrow stuff from his offense. I don’t really know all the reasons he didn’t work in the NFL, but I think his system, along with mutations of the WCO & Spread have contributed to the NFL being a passing league.

            It was clear the Falcons were determined not to let Kaep beat them with his feet yesterday. That opened stuff up for Gore & James, as well as stuff over the middle for Davis. We saw what happens if you don’t plan for the read-option (like Capers & Green Bay). Kaep is a better player–thrower, runner, everything, but that particular system maximizes his talent. Like I said, the Wildcat is a gimmick, because it can be defended week in and week out. Until we see that with the read option, it looks like a way to impose your will on the D.

          • The Guru

            This just sounds like you’re creating excuses for Chip Kelly and his scheme. Fact is, he’s been getting top 5 program talent for the last couple years. When USC got hit with sanctions, where do you think the elite west coast players went? Blame it on the system or coach, but Chip Kelly didn’t win a damn thing in DIII, 1-AA, or 1-A.

            Give defensive coordinators an entire offseason to gameplan for the read option and it will fizzle out just like the Wildcat. My point about Kaepernick is they took away his running and he stayed in the pocket and still won the game. I think it’s more about the player than the “read option”.

          • http://twitter.com/PhiIs_Goodman Phils Goodman

            “Fact is, he’s been getting top 5 program talent for the last couple years. When USC got hit with sanctions, where do you think the elite west coast players went?”

            That’s not a fact — it’s misinformation. His recent recruiting classes are usually ranked around the teens.

            Rivals ranked his 2012 class #16 in the nation — behind Stanford (#6), USC (#8) and UCLA (#13). They rank the 2011 class #9 (USC #4) and his 2010 class #13 (USC #1, UCLA #8, Cal #11).

            http://rivals.yahoo.com/footballrecruiting/football/recruiting/teamrank/2012/all/all

            Of course that’s better than what Oregon used to do (what else would you expect from one of the hottest programs in the country?), but this idea that Oregon had their pick of all the top talent on the West Coast is a myth.

            “My point about Kaepernick is they took away his running and he stayed in the pocket and still won the game.”

            The zone read isn’t just about the QB keep and it still influenced the game without Kaepernick taking many runs. It meant that the Falcons had to have a defender committed to Kaepernick even when he was handing the ball off to Gore or James, giving the 49ers O-line a numbers advantage (and helping the 49ers to over 5 yards per carry on the ground). It also meant that the Falcons had a lot less flexibility in coverage and were susceptible to play action, which contributed to the 49ers gaining nearly 11 yards per pass attempt.

          • The Guru

            Recruiting rankings are completely subjective. But, for the sake of argument, let’s say he was getting top 10ish talent (the drop in 2012 was due to him waffling on the pros). Your point is that he didn’t have enough talent to compete year in and year out for a college title? If that’s the case, I’m not really sure how you get out recruited by Lane Kiffin (for obvious reasons) and USC who was on probation. That just means he was doing a lousy job.

            Again, I have no idea what your point is regarding Kaepernick. I understand the point of the zone read offense, but are you saying this gimmick offense was the main cause for success more so than the player?

            And Urban Meyer ran this offense MUCH better than Chip Kelly and has the titles to prove it.

            http://espn.go.com/nfl/story/_/id/8853074/aaron-rodgers-green-bay-packers-read-option-eventually-pass

          • http://twitter.com/PhiIs_Goodman Phils Goodman

            >Recruiting rankings are completely subjective

            So when Rivals uses a systematic process to evaluate every major recruiting class in the country, that’s “completely subjective.”

            But when Matt Jacobs pulls a number out of thin air to trump up his own argument… no, that’s not subjective, that’s “fact.” Give me a break.

            Are Rivals rankings imperfect? Sure. Are they more credible than your amateur opinions? No question.

            >But, for the sake of argument, let’s say he was getting top 10ish talent

            2009: 32
            2010: 13
            2011: 9
            2012: 16

            Cracking the the top 10 once is now top 10″ish” talent now? You can say that, but I will go with the average rankings. It rounds to 13th over the last 3, and if we include his current senior class, it’s 17-18th. So let’s just go with the experts and ballpark it in the teens.

            >Your point is that he didn’t have enough talent to compete year in and year out for a college title?

            My point is that your point is wrong. I think I made that clear.

            He HAS been competing for National Championships, but he hasn’t been doing it with top 5 talent as you asserted.

            I never suggested that winning a NC should be a prerequisite for head coaching candidacy. That’s really a silly idea. The Eagles aren’t trying to win a BCS National Championship here.

            But a couple years ago, Kelly did come closer to breaking the run of SEC dominance than anyone else has. His QB in that game now plays in the Canadian Football League. The opposing QB was the #1 pick in the draft and shattered numerous rookie records the following season. The Ducks were a few bounces away from victory.

            >Again, I have no idea what your point is regarding Kaepernick

            Then read closer. I made my point perfectly clear. I think the zone read element makes San Francisco harder to defend and helps the 49ers offense perform better.

            >I understand the point of the zone read offense, but are you saying this gimmick offense was the main cause for success more so than the player?

            I meant exactly what I said. I think I have been communicating perfectly clearly, so I find it very frustrating that you are trying to push straw men arguments into this. I did not make any suggestion that the zone read was more important than the players running it. The point of coaching is to maximize the skills of the players in your offense, and I showed how I think the zone read is helping the 49ers do that.

            >And Urban Meyer ran this offense MUCH better than Chip Kelly and has the titles to prove it.

            Apparently current/former SEC coaches are the only ones who have proven anything in the last 8 years. For someone who was just making the point that players are more important than systems and coaches, this seems like a very odd position. Surely it must not escape you that the SEC produces the best players, therefore SEC coaches have a tremendous advantage when it comes to winning titles.

            Also, if you think that Chip Kelly and Urban Meyer run the same offense, then you are painting with a brushstroke that is much too wide. Of course there are many similarities, but Meyer’s offense at Florida featured a much more traditional one-back spread formation, incorporated a lot more true option (the zone read is not a true option play) and did not push the envelope with tempo in the same way. The way these offense are run is so much different that Chip Kelly said “We are not a Tim Tebow type of team” in 2009.

          • The Guru

            1. Rivals.com is completely subjective. The fact they use formulas is about as relevant as Sabermetrics in baseball. As I searched, I found 2 other websites that give Oregon much higher grades than 39 and 13. thus proving ratings as subjective. I disagree they are in the national title hunt with lesser talent. And for argument’s sake, let’s say they are playing with inferior talent. Who’s fault is that? Kelly either is sub-par with his talent evaluation, his system doesn’t prepare you for the NFL so he doesn’t get the top talent, or he’s not a good enough coach to maximize that talent in an inferior conference. When you can’t even win your lousy conference, I think it’s a major stretch to say Oregon is in the national title hunt. We also disagree that winning in college has no effect on winning in the pros. In my opinion, if he were that great of a coach, talent evaluator, or his system is so superior (like you say), results would show that.

            2. Your points are absurdly vague and thus, need clarification. In regards to Kaepernick and the zone read, Harbaugh has done an excellent job. But, I don’t agree that the zone read makes them harder to defend. I think Kaepernick makes them much harder to defend. He’s a much more talented QB than Smith and his ability to beat you on the ground or through the air is the reason they are tougher to defend. He could be in a pro style offense and he would be just as hard to defend.

            3. Meyer vs. Kelly. Obviously, each coach has his own spin on the offense, but the statement, “There are dozens of coaches if CFB who run the zone read, but none who did it as well as Chip Kelly coached teams.” is just flat out wrong. Meyer did it in Utah with more success than Kelly at Oregon and he did it in Florida and Ohio St. with more success. Is it the same exact offense? No. Is it close enough for your ridiculous statement to be proven wrong? Without question.

            Now, you can pick apart my slight exaggeration of “Top 5 talent” which was written to prove a point. But, in terms of the rest of your novel, but your Chip Kelly/zone read spin for the rest of your arguments are flimsy and lacks substance. My advice if you wish to continue this is be direct, get right to your point, and leave no open interpretation…..so that I may knock them out of the park just like I did here.

          • http://twitter.com/PhiIs_Goodman Phils Goodman

            >Rivals.com is completely subjective

            Rivals and Scout rely on expert opinion from professionals who scan the entire country year round, and they can catalog and document their rankings season after season. Meanwhile, you pulled a number out of thin air and haven’t sourced it with anything.

            Rivals and Scout get millions of hits a year. The only person paying attention to you is me.

            >As I searched, I found 2 other websites that give Oregon much higher grades than 39 [sic] and 13″

            Willing to share? It better not be Bleacher Report. Rivals and Scout are pretty much uniform when it comes to their appraisals of Oregon recruiting.

            2009: Rivals #32, Scout #26, Matt Jacobs “much higher grades according to research”
            2010: Rivals #13, Scout #13, Matt Jacobs “research”
            2011: Rivals #9, Scout #11, Matt Jacobs “top 5″
            2012: Rivals #16, Scout #15, Matt Jacobs “top 5″

            It’s the same exact “teens” ballpark from Scout and Rivals.

            You also claimed that Oregon had knocked off USC as the premier recruiter on the West Coast and started siphoning off their talent because of sanctions, but neither Rivals nor Scout give Oregon a better ranking than USC in any recent classes.

            http://recruiting.scout.com/a.z?s=73&p=9&c=14&yr=2012

            >And for argument’s sake, let’s say they are playing with inferior talent. Who’s fault is that?

            The classic “even if I’m wrong, I’m still right.” Nice try. It’s no one’s “fault.” Getting into the teens in annual recruiting is a gigantic step up for an upstart like Oregon. There is simply less talent in their local market. They have to convince guys from California and Texas not to go to powerhouse schools in their state and come up to frickin Eugene, Oregon. They do not recruit on equal footing.

            If you are really shocked that they don’t out-recruit USC, Texas and the big SEC teams on an annual basis, you’re only undermining your own shaky credibility the more you force the issue.

            >When you can’t even win your lousy conference, I think it’s a major stretch to say Oregon is in the national title hunt

            They won the Pac-10 in 2010 and lost the NCG by 3 points, finished the season ranked #3.

            They won the Pac-12 in 2011 and finished the season ranked #4 in the country. Their title hopes were dashed by a loss to USC on November 19. USC finished the season at #6. Their other loss that year was to SEC champion LSU, who finished the season ranked #2 and was the only team to beat Alabama that year. They finished the year by winning a BCS Bowl.

            This year they lost their shot at the NC and the Pac-12 on November 17 when they lost to a Stanford team that finished the season ranked #7.

            When they were ranked #2 in the country with two games left to play, it’s a stretch to say that they weren’t in the running for a National Championship.

            I have no idea what you consider to be “in the running” for a championship if the 2010-2012 Ducks don’t fit the bill.

            >We also disagree that winning in college has no effect on winning in the pros. In my opinion, if he were that great of a coach, talent evaluator, or his system is so superior (like you say), results would show that.

            Another awful straw man argument. I did not say that success in college was irrelevant. Kelly has been extremely successful in college. I said that making a National Championship a prerequisite for NFL consideration was silly, because it would limit you to selecting only the dominant recruiters in the SEC.

            After all, Nick Saban has proven himself much more successful on the NFL level than a college “failure” like Tom Coughlin, right? I mean, if you think Kelly doesn’t have results in college, Coughlin must have been just dreadful at BC.

            I also never claimed that Kelly was hired for his system.

            >In regards to Kaepernick and the zone read, Harbaugh has done an excellent job. But, I don’t agree that the zone read makes them harder to defend.

            Then why exactly do you think it’s an excellent job? You think it’s great, but that it’s essentially useless? You’re not making sense.

            >I think Kaepernick makes them much harder to defend.

            And you accuse ME of being vague? How exactly would the threat of Kaepernick make Gore or James harder to stop in the run game if not for the zone read? You realize that the zone read is unique from the traditional hand-off because it means that Kaepernick essentially “blocks” an extra man even when he hands the ball off, right? Tell me how the 49ers could do that without the zone read.

            >He’s a much more talented QB than Smith and his ability to beat you on the ground or through the air is the reason they are tougher to defend. He could be in a pro style offense and he would be just as hard to defend.

            Vague, vague, vague.

            Makes you wonder why Harbaugh would waste so much time installing that zone read stuff. Apparently it has 0 net benefit and does nothing to put Kaepernick is a better position to make plays.

            How exactly, in a “pro style offense,” would Kaepernick run for over 180 yards against the Packers with the vast majority of it on plays that started with the ball being tucked into the gut of Frank Gore?

            How exactly, in a “pro style offense,” would Colin Kaepernick give the 49ers a numbers advantage and effectively “block” an extra defender on a play where he hands the ball off and touches no one?

            How exactly, in a “pro style offense,” would the defense have to account for Colin Kaepernick carrying the ball to the outside in one direction and LaMichael James carrying the ball to the outside in the OTHER direction from the same formation?

            >Obviously, each coach has his own spin on the offense

            No, they are not even the same offense. You are further discrediting yourself the more you say it.

            >Meyer did it in Utah with more success than Kelly at Oregon and he did it in Florida and Ohio St. with more success.

            Kelly’s offense is centered around the zone read, and Meyer’s is not. I am not interested in having a sausage-waving contest between Meyer and Kelly.

            If you are actually interested in learning the specific differences between these offenses, go here:

            http://www.elevenwarriors.com/2012/02/not-all-spreads-are-alike

            >Is it close enough for your ridiculous statement to be proven wrong? Without question.

            I must have missed where you proved Meyer’s teams ran the zone read better than Kelly’s. But it would be a bit odd if Meyer’s teams ran a tertiary play in their offense better than one of the very best offenses in the nation ran its bread and butter play, don’t you think?

            >Now, you can pick apart my slight exaggeration of “Top 5 talent” which was written to prove a point.

            Oh, you were wrong on purpose. Got it.

            >your Chip Kelly/zone read spin for the rest of your arguments are flimsy and lacks substance

            And I find your posts shallow and pedantic.

            >My advice if you wish to continue this is be direct, get right to your point, and leave no open interpretation

            I have been blunt the entire time.

            >so that I may knock them out of the park just like I did here.

            No one is impressed by how loudly you toot your own horn.

          • The Guru

            Wow….really must have struck a nerve with a response like that. Which tells me two things. First, I am absolutely correct. And second, that response is obviously the incompetent ramblings of a guy who clearly does not understand football who thinks if I just pull out quotes in context, I won’t look foolish. So let me just sum up his stance on these issues:

            -Chip Kelly deserves no accountability for his inability to win a college title. Success in college is based solely on recruiting. Since the SEC clearly dominates recruiting, we should bow at the feet of Chip Kelly for the type of success (if you want to call it that) he’s had with inferior recruits. Mind you, this is a guy who does the recruiting and talent evaluation… who couldn’t even win his conference title this past year. National title contender who couldn’t even get to his conference title game….brilliant.

            -Winning a college title with a specific system (for which he was hired) has no correlation with winning in the pros with that same system. Obviously, this is completely absurd and I find it funny he says it with such conviction.

            -The zone read, which is an indefensible offense, was invented by Chip Kelly and no one in the history of college football ran it better. Course, this statement from YOUR article proves my point that Urban Meyer absolutely ran it better (two college titles): “The differences between an Oregon and Urban Meyer are not vast, but rather shades of gray. Nonetheless, these distinctions are crucial, for everything else these offenses do are built off the base scheme.” But then again, college titles don’t prove success right?

            -Why Chip Kelly was unable to win a title on any level (DIII, 1-AA, and D-1) with the fantastic zone read….well, that point just gets ignored.

            -The 49ers are only in the Super Bowl because of the zone read offense spawned from the Immortal Chip Kelly. And it’s the only offense that could possibly work with Kaepernick because of an extra defender that needs to watch out for the QB zone read run.

            Now you’ll have to forgive me for being skeptical of a coach with a specific system who was hired as our professional coach with no track record of winning a title using that system. Spurrier, Erickson, and Saban all came with much better track records and college titles to back up their systems and success….and the NFL chewed them up and spit them out. But, the immortal Chip Kelly and his magical zone read offense is going to buck the trend! Keep scouting Central Michigan’s QB and EJ Manuel (as if anyone gives a rat’s ass about your amateur report)….and regurgitating what you read on websites, and leave the educated football talk to guys who know the game. Or you going to say “HUH”? to that too?

          • http://twitter.com/PhiIs_Goodman Phils Goodman
          • The Dude

            I can’t believe I actually spent all this time reading this back and forth, but as a third party who has no real rooting interest, Matt Jacobs is correct. No one really cares if Oregon’s recruiting ranking is 5 or 9 so that is quite possibly the dumbest argument I’ve ever heard.

            I share MJ’s contention that if Chip Kelly were as innovative and ahead of the curve, wouldn’t he have won something on at least one of the levels he coached? That point cannot be overlooked or brushed aside like you’ve done. And Urban Meyer and Rich Rodriguez ran it way before Chip ever got to this level. There’s no way you can possibly argue Chip Kelly did it best. That’s just silly.

            I’m not sure I’d label the zone read as a gimmick, but I certainly would call it a fad. This is just an educated guess on my part, but it will be out of the game by 2016. Not only does it get your QB killed, but once teams start drafting CBs and Safeties who can hit again, it will run it’s course.

            It’s obvious Phils Goodman is a college football fan and apparently a huge Chip Kelly fan. But there is nothing to prove that he’s the guy who’s going to be the exception and not the rule. Everyone is excited by change, but in my opinion, we chose poorly.

          • JofreyRice

            It sounds like you’re shitting on it to reaffirm a preconceived notion, that he’s a gimmick coach. Maybe Kelly’s style won’t work in the NFL, but the guy has had some major success at every stop he’s been. If you can’t agree that a 46-7 record in 4 years as a head coach is “successful”, because he didn’t win a national championship, I’m not sure we have a common point of reasoning to start from. The talent level has improved at Oregon, but let’s check where Oregon players have gone early in the draft, compared with teams like Georgia, Alabama, Texas A&M, and other recruiting powerhouses; From 2010-2012: two second rounders–LaMichael James (2012) & TJ Ward (2010), and 1 third rounder, Ed Dickson (2010). The best QB Kelly’s worked with, in terms of talent, is available to be picked off a practice squad right now. Dion Jordan might be the first 1st rounder of his tenure, come April.

            The read-option isn’t only being run by the 49ers. The Panthers brought it in, to help Cam Newton transition last year. Ratface Shanahan ran it for RG3 in Washington, and Russell Wilson even ran it a bit for Seattle.

          • The Guru

            No I don’t see it as successful. But, you’re right…it all depends on what your definition of success is. You could also argue that Chip Kelly doesn’t get his players to go early in the draft not because of talent….but because they don’t run a pro style offense, or because they’re undersized, or because he doesn’t prepare you for the NFL. Not saying I’m right and you’re wrong, I’m just saying I think everyone is giving Kelly waaaayyy too much credit for things.

            Remind me how Cam Newton did after coordinators had a full off season to prepare for him….I think you’ll see the same thing happen to RGIII (if he ever gets back on the field) and Wilson.

      • http://twitter.com/PhiIs_Goodman Phils Goodman

        Huh?

    • JofreyRice

      The E-W Shrine game was my first look at Carder. I wasn’t too impressed. If he runs a 4.6, it doesn’t look like it, and he doesn’t really seem to have a lively arm. I did like Matt Scott, from Arizona. I agree with you that they need to take a QB late, to develop; maybe Carder is that guy.

      • http://twitter.com/PhiIs_Goodman Phils Goodman

        I didn’t get to see the game, but Matt Scott is definitely another guy who has been on my radar. I think he’s better and has a higher grade. A potential drawback with him is that he is relatively slight. Only looks to be about 200 pounds.