Instant Observations: Redskins 31, Eagles 6

Philadelphia Eagles head coach Andy ReidHere are my observations from the Eagles’ 31-6 loss to the Redskins Sunday afternoon.

OFFENSE

* Nick Foles finished 21-for-46 for 204 yards and two interceptions. His first interception bounced off of Brent Celek’s hands. Celek had a team-high six drops entering the game, and he added two more today. Foles’ second interception appeared to be on the quarterback. He also had a fumble in the third that was recovered by LeSean McCoy.

* McCoy had 15 carries for 45 yards (3.0 YPC). He suffered an apparent injury late in the fourth quarter. McCoy fumbled at the end of the first half with the Eagles simply trying to run the clock out. The Redskins picked up a field goal as a result.

* This week’s offensive line was Dennis Kelly (RT), Jake Scott (RG), Dallas Reynolds (center), Evan Mathis (LG) and King Dunlap (LT). Scott had a pair of false-start penalties in the first half and a holding in the fourth. Dunlap and Kelly also drew penalties.

* For some reason, the announcers said the Eagles have one of the best screen games in the NFL. That couldn’t be further from the truth, although they ran a couple good ones in the first half. One (to McCoy) picked up 24 yards.

* The Eagles had to settle for a field goal in the second. Brian Billick indicated that DeSean Jackson might have been open on the play. Later, the play-by-play  man said Jackson had been “jawing” all game. But the cameras showed little evidence of that.

* Damaris Johnson fell down in the second, but then delivered what was probably the Eagles’ best punt return of the year.

* Celek’s second drop came on 3rd-and-5 in the first half. The Eagles went with five wide receivers on the play: Bryce Brown, Celek, Clay Harbor, Johnson and Riley Cooper. If someone can explain to me why you would take Jeremy Maclin, DeSean Jackson and McCoy off the field at the same time in that spot, speak up.

* The Eagles benefited from great field position in the third and only had to go 23 yards for a Alex Henery field goal.

* Brown took over kickoff return duties from Brandon Boykin.

* Jackson and Maclin combined for two receptions for 5 yards on 12 targets.

* This was the third straight week the announcers discussed Andy Reid’s potential firing in the fourth quarter.

DEFENSE

* In a play that was typical of this season, Robert Griffin III threw one up for grabs in the third. Somehow, Santana Moss came down with it for a 61-yard touchdown between Kurt Coleman and Brandon Boykin, who had him double-teamed. Griffin went 14-for-15 for 200 yards, four touchdowns and no interceptions.

* In the fourth quarter, Coleman could not bring down tight end Logan Paulsen on a 17-yard touchdown.

* It looked like Darrel Young was probably Nate Allen’s responsibility on the Redskins’ first touchdown, which came after the Foles interception. So yes, poor safety play all game long (and all season long?). Good thing the Eagles decided they were fine there in the offseason.

* The Redskins’ second touchdown was a 49-yard bomb to Aldrick Robinson, who was wide-open in the end zone. It’s tough to say who was at fault based on TV replays.

* If you’re looking for a bright spot, it had to be DeMeco Ryans. That’s been the case all  year. He was really good against the run throughout. Fletcher Cox a bright spot too. He had a sack, a QB hit and a tackle for loss. Overall, Cox led the team with eight tackles (seven solo).

* The Eagles missed potential sacks all day. Part of that was on them, but a lot of it was on Griffin.

* Jason Babin had a sack from RDE in the third.

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