Haddonfield-Based Tech Firm Could Change the Way You Do CrossFit


Don’t be surprised if you walk into your CrossFit box someday soon and, instead of the whiteboards and clipboards coaches typically use to track athletes’ progress, you see sleek new LCD screens and computers. This is WODify, the age of the CrossFit future.

In fact, a handful of local CrossFit boxes, including CrossFit 215 in East Falls, CrossFit Supercharged in Graduate Hospital and CrossFit Conshohocken, already use WODify’s software and technology. “It’s a solution that benefits box owners and athletes,” says Ameet Shah, owner of East Haddonfield-based tech consulting firm Conigent and creator of WODify. “We help gym owners retain and attract athletes, and we make CrossFit even more competitive for those doing the workouts.”

Shah first envisioned a whiteboard-less, paper-less CrossFit box when he started doing CrossFit two years ago. As a former weightlifter, he liked the idea of logging workouts and tracking progress, but the paper-and-pencil method that’s de rigueur at CrossFit gyms was tedious—and, in the age of “There’s an app for that,” a tad outdated. “The problem with CrossFit is the routines are pretty complex, so tracking your performance on a piece of paper can eat up a lot of time,” Shah says. “I honestly don’t have time for that, so that’s when I decided to find a way to streamline it.”

His solution was a cloud-based software that would—pardon the pun—do the heavy lifting for you. From the athlete’s side, WODify’s app and website allows you to sign up for and check in to classes, record and track performance (entering just three easy pieces of data), and compare your results to others. For box owners, the software allows you to create and bill memberships, shuffle class schedules, monitor attendance and more. In the gym, athletes see their names on mounted TV monitors and can check into class and log reps from a kiosk.


WODify is free for athletes to use, but box owners must pay for the hardware (monitors, keyboard, etc.) as well as up to $350 a month for the service.

"In the whiteboard model, your name goes on the board for that class and at the end of the day that whiteboard gets erased. We're providing an app where we're tracking a ton of data and we're not going to erase it," says Shah. "It raises the level of competition and helps you feel more invested in your workout."

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