Remembering Eagles Coach Buddy Ryan

Randall Cunningham, quarterback for the Philadelphia Eagles talks with head coach Buddy Ryan during a light training session, Aug. 5, 1989, at London's Wembley Stadium where they will take on the Cleveland Browns for the 1989 American Bowl. (AP Photo/Gillian Allen)

Randall Cunningham, quarterback for the Philadelphia Eagles talks with head coach Buddy Ryan during a light training session, Aug. 5th, 1989. | Photo by Gillian Allen/AP

Buddy Ryan, the Eagles coach who built one of the greatest defenses in NFL history, has died. He was 82.

Ryan coached the Eagles for five seasons, winning one division title and making the playoffs three times. He never won a playoff game, but he is beloved in Philadelphia.

Take the Dallas Cowboys, perhaps the most hated team of Eagles fans. In 1987, with the Eagles about to win the game, Ryan faked a kneeldown and had Randall Cunningham throw a long pass downfield. On the next play, the last one of the game, the Eagles scored a meaningless touchdown to run up the score. It was in retaliation for Cowboys coach Tom Landry using players who crossed the picket line against the Eagles’ replacements earlier in the season. Read more »

Remembering Eagles Coach Buddy Ryan

Randall Cunningham, quarterback for the Philadelphia Eagles talks with head coach Buddy Ryan during a light training session, Aug. 5, 1989, at London's Wembley Stadium where they will take on the Cleveland Browns for the 1989 American Bowl. (AP Photo/Gillian Allen)

Randall Cunningham, quarterback for the Philadelphia Eagles talks with head coach Buddy Ryan during a light training session, Aug. 5th, 1989. | Photo by Gillian Allen/AP

Buddy Ryan, the Eagles coach who built one of the greatest defenses in NFL history, has died. He was 85.

Ryan coached the Eagles for five seasons, winning one division title and making the playoffs three times. He never won a playoff game, but he is beloved in Philadelphia.

Take the Dallas Cowboys, perhaps the most hated team of Eagles fans. In 1987, with the Eagles about to win the game, Ryan faked a kneeldown and had Randall Cunningham throw a long pass downfield. On the next play, the last one of the game, the Eagles scored a meaningless touchdown to run up the score. It was in retaliation for Cowboys coach Tom Landry using players who crossed the picket line against the Eagles’ replacements earlier in the season. Read more »

What the Supreme Court Abortion Ruling Means for Pennsylvania

Pro-abortion rights protesters rally outside the Supreme Court in Washington, Wednesday, March 2, 2016.

Pro-abortion rights protesters rally outside the Supreme Court in Washington, Wednesday, March 2, 2016.

A ruling by the Supreme Court today overturning parts of an abortion regulation law in Texas has ties to Pennsylvania.

The Supreme Court specifically cited the case of Philadelphia’s Kermit Gosnell in its ruling today on Whole Women’s Health v. Hellerstedt. “Gosnell’s behavior was terribly wrong,” the court wrote in its majority opinion. “But there is no reason to believe that an extra layer of regulation would have affected that behavior.”

Justice Stephen Breyer wrote the majority opinion, joined by Anthony Kennedy, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Sonia Sotomayor and Elena Kagan. Chief Justice John Roberts and Justices Clarence Thomas and Samuel Alito dissented.

“The Court has affirmed what we already knew: strategically over-regulating healthcare facilities that provide abortion care so that they are forced to close does nothing to protect women’s health, despite the disingenuous claims of anti-abortion lawmakers, in Texas and here in Pennsylvania,” said Sue Frietsche, senior staff attorney at the Philadelphia-based Women’s Law Project (which had its amici brief cited in Ginsburg’s concurrence). “These mean-spirited, misguided attacks on women’s health are plainly unconstitutional and they need to stop.”

The Texas law, passed in 2013, required abortion doctors to have admitting privileges at a nearby hospital, and mandates all clinics in the state to meet the standards for ambulatory surgical centers — including regulations concerning buildings, equipment and staffing. It shrunk the number of abortion clinics in the state from 41 to 18. The Supreme Court ruled those parts of the Texas law to be unconstitutional. Read more »

Bob Casey’s Profound About-Face on Gun Control

In 2009, during his first term in the U.S. Senate, Bob Casey voted to allow guns on Amtrak trains. He was not a believer in gun control, and his votes showed it.

A little more than three years later, 20 children and six adults were killed at Sandy Hook Elementary School in December 2012. In a matter of days, Casey flipped positions. The Democrat has since become a gun control advocate. He was the first to introduce gun control legislation after the massacre in Orlando.

Sen. Casey sat down with Philadelphia magazine on Friday for an interview about his reversal, his bill that would prohibit those convicted of hate crimes from buying guns, and the future of gun control measures in the Senate. This interview has been lightly edited for length and clarity.

How did you come to change your stance on gun control?
In some ways, it happened over a three- or four-day period — from Friday to Tuesday. That tragedy in Newtown changed my view forever.

It wasn’t just “How will you handle this issue going forward,” but: “How will you vote?” At that point and time, I had been in the Senate six years, we never really had significant gun votes. We maybe had 1 or 2, but they weren’t three major up-or-down votes like we had with the military-style weapons, the clips/magazines and the background checks — they were the major three, in the spring of ’13. Read more »

Funeral for Philly Victim of Orlando Shooting Is Today

A funeral service is being held today for Akyra Murray, the Philadelphia teen victim of the massacre in Orlando on June 12th. She was the youngest victim of the 49 shot dead at Pulse nightclub.

It was scheduled to begin at 10 a.m. this morning. The Inquirer reports mourners were streaming into Monument Baptist Church at 50th and Locust streets in West Philadelphia by 8 a.m. for the viewing.

Murray, 18, was a 2016 graduate of West Catholic Prep. She had signed to play basketball at Mercyhurst University this fall. Read more »

Philly Latino Activists: Obama Is “Deporter-in-Chief”

People assemble for a press conference at Juntos in response to today's Supreme Court ruling on immigration

Members of the Latino immigrant community appear at a press conference decrying today’s Supreme Court ruling on Obama’s immigration program.

According to Philadelphia’s Latino immigrant activists, Barack Obama’s primary legacy from his eight years in office can be summed up in three words: Deporter in chief.

Activists and organizers today gathered at Juntos in South Philly to comment on today’s split ruling from the Supreme Court on President Obama’s immigration policy.

The court actually ruled on a program Obama and immigration activists support today. In a one-sentence decision — “The judgment is affirmed by an equally divided Court” — the court announced it had split, 4-all, which means the Obama administration will not be able to implement its immigration plans before the end of his term. Read more »

New McGinty Ad Calls Toomey “Senator Elevator”

Republicans running for office have a major problem this year, and his name is Donald Trump. While Trump is popular, this is his first run for public office — and he’s not on the same page as the GOP in terms of messaging. Naturally, the press is grilling downballot Republicans about his comments.

One such Republican running for office is Pennsylvania Sen. Pat Toomey. He’s distanced himself a bit from Trump. He was a supporter of Marco Rubio, and voted for Ted Cruz in Pennsylvania’s April primary. He even penned an Inquirer op-ed giving Trump some unsolicited advice while saying he would vote for the party’s nominee.

“I hope to get to the point where I can enthusiastically support Donald Trump,” Toomey later said. “I’m not there right now and I hope we don’t get to a point where I decide I just can’t support him.”

He’s not quite there yet. After Trump’s speech on the Orlando massacre was widely panned, Toomey ducked into an elevator when reporters asked questions. Read more »

ACLU Sues City Over DNC Protest Permit Denial

The Poor People's Economic Human Rights Campaign and the ACLU announce their lawsuit against Philadelphia

From left: Elizabeth Ortiz, German Parobi, Cheri Honkla, Galen Tyler and Mary Catherine Roper. The ACLU and the Poor People’s Economic Human Rights Campaign gathered on Thursday morning to announce a lawsuit against the City.

The ACLU filed a lawsuit against the City of Philadelphia today over the denial of a protest march permit on the opening day of the Democratic National Convention. The lawsuit was filed on behalf of the Poor People’s Economic Human Rights Campaign, founded in 1998 by Cheri Honkala.

“This city closes down streets for block parties, for Cinco de Mayo, for food festivals — including during rush hour — but they will not give the protesters permission to use the streets during rush hour,” ACLU of Pennsylvania Deputy Legal Director Mary Catherine Roper said.

At a press conference today in South Philadelphia, Roper and Honkala outlined their grievance: The city, they say, has forbidden protest marches in Center City between 7 a.m. and 9 a.m. and 3 p.m. and 6 p.m. during this summer’s DNC. Honkala’s group wants to march down Broad Street from City Hall to the Wells Fargo Center at 3 p.m. on the opening day of the convention, July 25th.

“We’re the only folks so far that I know of that have been told we cannot march,” Honkala said. Read more »

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