Taste: Recipe: Roast Chicken with Celeriac, Rosemary and Apples


For apple-cider glaze:
2 c. apple cider
2 c. chicken stock
2 to 3 sprigs thyme
½ c. chopped onion
2 bay leaves
1 tsp. black peppercorns
1 tsp. coriander seed
1 tsp. fennel seed

In a saucepan over high heat, bring all ingredients to a boil and reduce until the liquid is syrupy and equals about 2 cups. Strain, reserve the glaze, and keep warm.

For marinated chicken:
½ c. shallots, minced
2 Tbsp. fresh rosemary, chopped fine
1 Tbsp. kosher salt
½ tsp. ground black pepper
¼ c. canola oil
3 broiler-fryer chickens, about 2½ to 3 pounds each, split in half, with backbone cut away

In a bowl, combine shallots, rosemary, salt, pepper and oil. Rub marinade over chicken halves. Refrigerate chicken at least 2 hours and up to 2 days, covered.

For apples, celeriac and red onion:
1 large celeriac (celery root), pared and cut into wedges
2 large, unpeeled Fuji apples (or other firm, red-skinned varieties), cored and cut into thick wedges
Juice of 1 lemon
2 small red onions, peeled and cut into wedges

Cook celeriac for 2 minutes in boiling salted water. Drain and reserve. Toss apple wedges with lemon juice. Combine apples with red onions and celery root and reserve.

To assemble:
Remove chicken from refrigerator 1/2 hour before cooking. Preheat oven to 450 degrees Fahrenheit. Drain and pat dry chicken halves. Arrange skin side down in a large baking pan. Scatter apple mixture over top. Roast until the chicken is three-quarters cooked, about 25 minutes. Turn chicken halves over, basting with pan juices, and continue cooking until chicken skin is browned and the chicken registers 165 degrees Fahrenheit on a meat thermometer when measured at the thickest portion of the thigh, about 25 minutes longer.
Arrange chicken and vegetables on serving dish and top with warm apple-cider glaze. Serves six.

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