Feature: Is It Just Us, Or Are Kids Getting Really Stupid?

They don’t read. They can’t spell. They spend all their time playing computer games and texting and hanging out with one another on Facebook. But the problem is much worse than you think, because the way your kids live now is rewiring their brains

Still, it seems obvious that kids like Jake — meaning most kids — are spending way too much time at one thing instead of learning all they could. Isn’t it self-evident that my son would be a better student, better future employee, better human being, if he spent six hours a day reading Tolstoy and listening to Bach instead of playing WoW?

“Adults have always been afraid of their culture being lost,” Penn’s Sharon Ravitch declares. “Okay, so classical music may be lost, but what about the broader array of music I’m exposed to? We fear we’re losing the moral base. But the postmodern view is that the moral base didn’t resonate with a lot of kids. We have this mythological notion of what people used to know, but that’s male, white, Western-based knowledge. What is teaching? What is learning? What is the political basis of schools?”

Maybe I’m just crotchety because I had to read dead white men’s books instead of playing games. Maybe kids aren’t stupider at all; maybe the new ways of learning really are just different, not inherently worse. Maybe — oh, God — I should be on Facebook.

I need to talk to more kids Jake’s age before I can decide.

ON A RAINY NIGHT in September, the concession stand outside the fence surrounding Cheltenham High’s football field is a bright oasis of light. The game, against Quakertown, is tied. Beneath the stand’s sloped roof, Ally Gardiner, blond and blue-eyed and scrubbed-face pretty, is scooping hot dogs out of a vat of boiling water and laying them atop the rollers of an electric grill.

“Two more hot dogs!” her friend Dana sings out. Ally and Dana and a clutch of other student-council members are handing candy bars and Cokes to customers at the window and collecting cash in return. Ally ran for this year’s president of student council and won. Her platform, she explains, with the grill rollers once more full, was all about inclusion.

“I really care about the school,” she says, hair curling in tendrils from the hot-dog water. “I want to bring people together in spirit. More of a variety … a lot of … ” Her voice, usually clear and assertive, trails off for a moment while she regroups. “Everybody has an opinion about how the school should run. But people don’t feel comfortable coming forward. So we need to hand opportunities to them — to a wide, diverse range of students.”

Ally’s taking this on while taking AP Psychology, AP Statistics, AP Calculus, Anatomy, English Honors, gym — “It’s required” — Sports Leadership and Economics. She’s also a three-sport athlete — cross-country plus winter and spring track. She ran for president because she’s passionate about student government. That’s the only reason she does all she does, she says. She gets to school at seven in the morning and sometimes doesn’t get home till 10. She spends an hour or two a day online, maybe three if she’s doing research. Half an hour or so goes to Facebook: “I don’t use the computer often for recreational things.”

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  • Tony

    It’s funny that those that STILL read, have to pay the click price. This article is fascinating, but could EASILY be one long web page. Instead we have to click 9 times to get through. and get 9 sets of ads. Just another way text and reading will die.

    • drew

      well if you knew anything about web page design you would’t have posted that comment

      • Steve

        Would you cae to elaborate on that statement or simply make a nebulous like that. In the age of web 2 and 3 point oh, there are infinit ways that the page could have been constructed, for example auto loading of content once the reader reached a position in a segment. The original comment is absolutly valid. We are, in this web page’s design, forced to use the mechanism of clicking through 9 pages, not because of sound practices, but because someone wants to make money off of you.

  • Guy

    Flynn Effect. Nuff said.

  • Patti

    A generation’s learning style does not change…there are plenty of kids who read books, socialize, etc. Academia is studing social networkers and making statements on all kids.

    This article reminds me of my father, who walked uphill to school…both ways…in the snow.

  • Joe

    Nah in PA they’ve always been a little behind;

  • Anna

    This reads like a half-hearted attempt to stir up fear. As a “stupid kid” who is constantly reading in school, writing papers, and doing all the other things this digital generation supposedly doesn’t do, I think I can say that this is full of crap. We actually analyzed Bauerlein’s book in my linguistics class, and it was determined that he provides no legitimate evidence to support his claims. Also, can you really argue that the internet gives kids a NARROWER worldview? The internet allows us stupid kids to really learn about all the sides of issues–quickly and easily– instead of taking one person’s word for it. In the old-time small towns, it was hard to find a differing opinion, and prejudice ran rampant. If your kid doesn’t know the days of the week, I hate to tell you, but maybe you should take a little responsibility, instead of blaming “kids these days.”

  • Anna

    This reads like a half-hearted attempt to stir up fear. As a “stupid kid” who is constantly reading in school, writing papers, and doing all the other things this digital generation supposedly doesn’t do, I think I can say that this is full of crap. We actually analyzed Bauerlein’s book in my linguistics class, and it was determined that he provides no legitimate evidence to support his claims. Also, can you really argue that the internet gives kids a NARROWER worldview? The internet allows us stupid kids to really learn about all the sides of issues–quickly and easily– instead of taking one person’s word for it. In the old-time small towns, it was hard to find a differing opinion, and prejudice ran rampant. If your kid doesn’t know the days of the week, I hate to tell you, but maybe you should take a little responsibility, instead of blaming “kids these days.”

  • Elisabeth

    I’d really like to see your sources. The “facts” you cited at the end about connecting on the Internet being linked to depression are incorrect. In fact, the opposite is true: children who use the Internet as an extension to their social life actually connect better with their peers. The only time depression comes into play is if the child exhibited preexisting antisocial behavior. (Source: Desjarlais, M., & Willoughby, T. 2010. Computers in Human Behavior, 26(5), 896-905.)

    Additionally, Internet use has been shown to improve numerous cognitive abilities. In longitudinal studies, students who regularly used the Internet had stronger reading and writing skills and better GPAs. (Source: Jackson, L.A, von Eye, A., & Biocca, F.A. 2003. First Latin American Web Congress.)

    • drew

      there are teens committing suicide from being outed on Facebook all the time, so how can you say that peers on such sites help to cure depression.

      and kids are not getting smarter from using the internet, the tests are just getting easier

  • Caroline

    Because I’m a high school student in the Philadelphia metropolitan area, and I can guarantee you that almost every single english-speaking student in my school has known the days of the week since the 1st grade. Also, we have read books in every single english class since the third grade.

  • molly

    This whole article is purely composed of half-halfheartedly searched research and a mother who couldn’t teach her child the days of the week. As a highschool student, I would know first hand if we never read books, was always plugged in to electronics, or didn’t know the days of the week. The truth is we DO know the days of the week–i bet of you poled 20 kids in the philly area they would know the days of the week. The fact that you’re using your dumb kid as an example of teh teen population is just stupid.

  • Harry

    The article quotes some education professors who say it is ok if kids are not learning basic skills. They define that as a different education. The test should be what can the kids do? After you read a book or article can you summarize, discuss, debate, etc? What can you do – write, develop plans and solutions for problems, design something, create something, build something, etc?

  • Lauren

    I bought this right up to:
    “and in Jake’s case, the days of the week. (He’s shaky on the months, too.) ”
    This kid is a JUNIOR in HIGH SCHOOL. And WATCHING MOVIES IN HIGH SCHOOL? 1) the kids going to a dummy high school. My poor daughter is ALWAYS reading and writing papers out the wazzo and 2) I think Jake might have a learning disability or something. Shaky on the months and days of the week? A junion in HS is like 16 years old.

    Sorry big fail for this article. Big fail for the lame old “kids these days” bullcrap.

    • drew

      your seriously going to publicly insult someones kid over the internet, because you did’t like the article. just who the hell do you think you are?
      and your “poor daughter” should be given assignments all the time. when i was in private school i was writing seven page papers in the fifth grade.

  • Tyler

    How can you possibly sit back and write this essay when your generation is clearly to blame for this “issue” that apparently plagues the high schools today?
    1) We are not responsible for educating ourselves.
    2) If we are watching movies, we are most likely reading the books along with them, analyzing plot themes along the way, and writing massive analytical papers. The amount of work done today is easily 10x what it used to be.
    3) Weak unresearched facts based one-sidedly mean nothing. More than 30% of Adult Americans cannot name 5 countries in Africa. And you elected a Senator from Massachusetts that thinks an island can “tip.” (Don’t believe me? Google it.)

    Stop stereotyping and making painful generalizations, as well as setting a bad example for us. Some of us want to succeed.

    atb414@yahoo.com

  • Tyler

    How can you possibly sit back and write this essay when your generation is clearly to blame for this “issue” that apparently plagues the high schools today?
    1) We are not responsible for educating ourselves.
    2) If we are watching movies, we are most likely reading the books along with them, analyzing plot themes along the way, and writing massive analytical papers. The amount of work done today is easily 10x what it used to be.
    3) Weak unresearched facts based one-sidedly mean nothing. More than 30% of Adult Americans cannot name 5 countries in Africa. And you elected a Senator from Massachusetts that thinks an island can “tip.” (Don’t believe me? Google it.)

    Stop stereotyping and making painful generalizations, as well as setting a bad example for us. Some of us want to succeed.

    atb414@yahoo.com

  • Zach

    Good educators understand that you must adapt to those which you seek to teach rather than trying to force them to adapt to a rigid old archetype of top down learning. It isn’t that youth are stupid, it is that majority of educators and higher learning institutions aren’t creative/smart enough to find ways to adapt to better teach classic much needed information.

  • Zach

    Good educators understand that you must adapt to those which you seek to teach rather than trying to force them to adapt to a rigid old archetype of top down learning. It isn’t that youth are stupid, it is that majority of educators and higher learning institutions aren’t creative/smart enough to find ways to adapt to better ways to teach classic much needed information.

  • alison

    I literally could not even read this entire article due to the broad-based judgement as well as uninformed nature of the author. As a gen-y-er…I am in between both generations. The reality is this: the school system that put me in MOUNDS of debt is old. It is broken. The only thing I gained from it was how to socially interact with my peers and teachers. NONE OF THE STUFF I LEARNED IN SCHOOL I ACTUALLY USE IN MY LIFE. NONE OF IT. The reality is this: the world is changing–shocker!–and our children are moving faster than the adults are. They can weed out useless crap and focus on what needs to be done. It’s so freakin ridiculous to call our future generations stupid. Congratulations, you have morphed into your parents and grandparents. Things change people. This is nothing new. But apparently you are so stupid, you didn’t take that into account as a baseline for why kids behaviors are–gasp–different than yours were. How stupid can
    you be?

  • Eric

    …doesn’t mean you should generalize an entire generation. The fact that your son was in an AP English class and yet did not read books and, Christ, did not know the days of the week, means that both his school AND his parents are failing him. You’re so quick to pin the blame on the rapid advancement of technology, when in fact NONE of this could have been possible without the labor of your generation. YOUR GENERATION created the world of today and it’s now up to MY GENERATION to live with it.

  • Stephanie

    I’m not even an old timer – I’m 27. And I find myself caught between the world of high schoolers, whom I teach, and the world of my parents who are just as overwhelmed as I by the overstimulating nature of technology. It definitely doesn’t sit right with me at all. I hate the ADD side of my nature; it makes accomplishing larger, time-consuming tasks more difficult. But at least, if I really force myself, I can concentrate as long as I need to on my long term goals. I don’t, however, see that ability in the majority of the kids I teach. I see that as being neither evolution nor progress.

  • Stephanie

    I’m not even an old timer – I’m 27. And I find myself caught between the world of high schoolers, whom I teach, and the world of my parents who are just as overwhelmed as I by the overstimulating nature of technology. It definitely doesn’t sit right with me at all. I hate the ADD side of my nature; it makes accomplishing larger, time-consuming tasks more difficult. But at least, if I really force myself, I can concentrate as long as I need to on my long term goals. I don’t, however, see that ability in the majority of the kids I teach. I see that as being neither evolution nor progress.

  • Firstname

    Your son doesn’t know the days of the week or all the months and you’re not sure why he’s a moron?

    It’s because of you. You have failed your son.

  • Dave

    I think there is an intelligent piece to write on this theme. This, however, certainly isn’t it. As a teacher, I don’t witness any more playing of movies than when I was a kid and only, of course, as supplements to actual reading. The factors mentioned by the author certainly affect the way kids socialize, relate, enter romantic relationships, etc, but they still learn! Texting may be changing their brain waves, but it’s not eliminating them entirely. Maybe the author should just be worried about her own kid, who by her description is the dumbest person in the history of the world. What lame journalism.

  • Kimberly

    I don’t know of ANY parents in the Philadelphia area who would say that kids are dumber. I am seeing high school kids work many more hours outside of school (while maintaining active in athletics, scouting, religious groups, etc)on homework and group projects than ever before(many of which make very creative use of technology). I regularly see books that I read in college coming home, at both the middle and high school levels. I agree that conversation skills are lacking since so many choose to text or Facebook message nstead of actually talk to others, but as to academics, kids today (at least in the Philadelphia suburbs) are worlds ahead of where we were just 20 years ago. I am surprised that PHILADELPHIA Magazine would publish an article with such a biased and false title and lead.

  • L

    Hmmm.. much defensiveness on the part of offended (mostly teen?) READERS — perhaps NOT the screen-obsessed teens being written about in the article? However, here’s the worry for this mom. Real life doesn’t come with push buttons. Problems are complex in the making and complex in the solutions. A generation rewired and conditioned to expect instant gratification and one-click consequences to their actions is going to feel perpetually BORED and intolerant of the time and perseverance it takes to solve most of the challenges thrown their way, be it in relationships, making a livelihood, as parents, in geopolitics, you name it. It’s not just the kids being rewired, it’s their parents as well who find YouTube a better source for info than a newspaper or even, God forbid, an actual dialogue with knowledgeable people. Evidence? recent election results won via fear-mongering sound bites, anger at the administration for failing to cure the decades-in-the-making economy in two years, and more knowledge about who won Dancing with the Stars than who won that election. It’s tempting to paint all technology with the same bad brush. But the internet and digital tools aren’t the problem. How folks use them to develop…

  • l

    . But the internet and digital tools aren’t the problem. How folks use them to develop and feed always accessible addictions IS a problem. Violent gaming, designed by well-paid industrial psychologists and manufacturers to be addictive, wires kids’ brains for levels of stimulation that real life can’t possibly match. An inability converse with the person right next to you because you feel compelled to text or check facebook every few minutes meets my definition of obsessive-compulsive behavior. If it was a drug filling that need, we’d intervene. But the 24/7 onslaught and inability to control the substance causes way too many parents to throw in the towel. No solutions here, but we dismiss this as ‘just a phase’ or generation-gap business-as-usual at our kids’ peril.

  • Eric

    While I disagree on a number of your points, as a senior in college I can understand why you feel so apprehensive about the incoming generation. While I advise you not to worry so much about it, the idea of completely dismissing it isn’t a smart decision either. From my perspective, each new generation shapes the world into something that best suits them while the older generations shake their heads in disapproval. Yet somehow both generations are able to coexist. So while high schoolers might need someone to tell them to get off the phone, maybe more parents should start linking in.

  • Adam

    FIRST! The first commenter seems to be putting the blame on our generation (the “stupid” kids) for the bad election. Here are the facts: Far less voters under the age of 25 voted this year than voted in 2008, therefore it is the older generations who are actually to blame. SECOND! About the article itself. None of the “facts” she brought up had sources, like mentioned above, and none had actual numbers associated with them. THIRD! Because we have access to all of this information, we are able to have, get this, MORE INTELLIGENT CONVERSATIONS because we know more, and we do have to sort through a ton of information to get the important stuff, which, get this, IS CRITICAL THINKING! I am very surprised that ANY magazine would have this article actually published.
    Sincerely,
    A Very Intelligent Teenager, Thank You Very Much!

  • Bevin

    Interesting, but SO much misinformation in the article – for being about focus, it’s surprisingly unfocused and circular.

    For instance this paragraph “The Nielsen Norman Group, a consulting firm whose founder was deemed by the New York Times to be “the guru of Web page ‘usability,’” has done extensive research into what makes websites successful. Its advice to clients? Nothing higher than a sixth-grade reading level on the home page, and eighth-grade on subsequent pages. One idea per paragraph.” has NOTHING to do with teens. That’s been the advice given since web usability became a “thing” – long before the millenials were out of diapers. The average newspaper has to be written to a what is it 8th grade reading level? And it has been that way for…EVER.

    I love how it insinuates that the polarization of America has something to do with technology – it’s total and utter bullpucky because in reality, that’s a boomer+ mess, one of the smaller groups on the internet – not a teen problem. In fact, the millenials and below are MORE community oriented and willing to reach across the aisle…not less.

    If the author would like to meet children who are both technologically connected and avid…

  • Bevin

    What I meant to say was if the author would like to meet children who are both active online socially, great researchers, readers and can translate quarts into gallons, know the days of the week, know the months, can discuss books quite critically etc. well then you just come over to my house, and you’ll find something different in those “stupid” kids.

    This is a terribly disappointing and poorly researched article meant to stir up fear and anger. Now, who is responsible for the polarization, again?

  • Kevin

    Who bought her son his cell phone, who paid for his WoW account, who pays for the internet bill. I find it interesting this author is eager to point the finger, but fails to consider her own role in the this equation. It says more about her need to believe she is a good parent than the role technology plays. Maybe a bit more structure to her children’s lives that involved non-screen time would do more than blaming Farmville for the down fall of Western Civilization.

  • Alex

    What is with this? Where did you get the average of 3,339 texts per month? Who did you survey for that? Who did you survey for the 440 friends on Facebook? Or How many people for the average, two? I’m twelve years old i have read The Prince by Niccolo Machiavelli and other such classics. How can you say as a nation kids are getting dumber if multiple if in my school and others the stress on school work is just increasing?

  • Alex

    What is with this? Where did you get the average of 3,339 texts per month? Who did you survey for that? Who did you survey for the 440 friends on Facebook? Or How many people for the average, two? I’m twelve years old i have read The Prince by Niccolo Machiavelli and other such classics. How can you say as a nation kids are getting dumber if multiple if in my school and others the stress on school work is just increasing?

  • Alex

    What is with this? Where did you get the average of 3,339 texts per month? Who did you survey for that? Who did you survey for the 440 friends on Facebook? Or How many people for the average, two? I’m twelve years old i have read The Prince by Niccolo Machiavelli and other such classics. How can you say as a nation kids are getting dumber if multiple if in my school and others the stress on school work is just increasing?

  • Alex

    What is with this? Where did you get the average of 3,339 texts per month? Who did you survey for that? Who did you survey for the 440 friends on Facebook? Or How many people for the average, two? I’m twelve years old i have read The Prince by Niccolo Machiavelli and other such classics. How can you say as a nation kids are getting dumber if multiple if in my school and others the stress on school work is just increasing?

  • Rick

    Maybe the kids aren’t deficient in knowing the American Idol winner moreso than the Speaker of the House. Maybe they have been just blocking out the horror of who the Speaker has been for the last 4 years.

  • Martin

    Here, we find yet another Philadelphia Magazine article with an ever-changing thesis, misguided arguments, and an ad hominem title concocted to sell as many copies as possible. I get up at 5 AM, leave for school at 7, leave school around 6 PM (sometimes as late as 10 PM) and then I work until midnight. I would say that this schedule is typical of most of the other students at my school.

    For the record, my junior English (not even an honors class) actually read The Great Gatsby. We didn’t even watch the movie because we decided that it would ruin our ability to analyze the novel.

  • R.J.

    As you can see the person here is not really trying to relay the fact all kids that use the internet are dumb or it’s not a useful tool. If you would read a little more carefully you would understand the author points, all the great things that can be accomplished when using the internet/ technology. The reasoning behind this article is why people are quick to line up and defend such a culture that doesn’t read and pay attention as much as they had too before (and some response prove that point) because everything is right there, given to them, they don’t have to work for anything anymore, something as simple as knowing what day it is; because they can look it up on their cell phone. I work in higher education and that is the honest truth. In a perfect world, students should harness the power of the internet and convince of our tech. advancements, but yet they have let the advancements take care of them. Only cretin people can realize that, those people usual do or had worked with students or are concerned parents, and the author is one of them.

  • Aife

    Circular logic. It’s so much fun, isn’t it? Sorry, I find this full of ridiculous stereotypes. “Those kids these days. They don’t learn anything! We had a paper every other day, and had to walk uphill in the school both ways, juggle extracurricular activities AND keep up a social life.” What are you, the Cat in the Hat? “Oh, my son’s so absent-minded! He doesn’t even know what day of the week it is!” Just because they don’t know what day of the week it is, doesn’t mean they can’t solve complex mathematical formulas that I dare any disgruntled parent to tackle. We have to do it every day. I’m juggling 4 projects as we speak. The internet allows the human race to transfer and utilize parcels of information never available in this scale. With a click you can access billions of documents, but, guess what? To access the information in said documents, you need-Critical thinking skills! Amazing. And you do make a very good point when it comes to our hard-wiring that makes us, as individual human beings, us. It’s different than yours. But that’s the beauty of the human mind. It changes to new circumstance. It adapts.

  • Maddie

    This is from one of the ‘stupid’ teenagers. You, the writer, is the real idiot.

  • Maddie

    This is from one of the ‘stupid’ teenagers. You, the writer, is the real idiot.

  • Zack

    This is a very scary outlook, and as a 11th grader, I have to say I agree with what you are saying. The new generation, with which I am a part of, albeit an outlier, seems farther apart. In some situations, me, the hermit, can participate better in the real world than my peers. This seems to be a new scary truth, maybe the few people with a much better understanding of the world will rule over the masses of easily confused adults, who will believe whatever they want to here. Another equally eire option would be to have to install classes to TEACH children the ‘correct’ way to behave, I dread to think how any dictator wanting power would use this to their advantage, it would almost be too easy for them.

  • Zack

    This is a very scary outlook, and as a 11th grader, I have to say I agree with what you are saying. The new generation, with which I am a part of, albeit an outlier, seems farther apart. In some situations, me, the hermit, can participate better in the real world than my peers. This seems to be a new scary truth, maybe the few people with a much better understanding of the world will rule over the masses of easily confused adults, who will believe whatever they want to here. Another equally eire option would be to have to install classes to TEACH children the ‘correct’ way to behave, I dread to think how any dictator wanting power would use this to their advantage, it would almost be too easy for them.

  • Sheth

    The author is on point and the thin skinned kids who are responding angrily are proving it. I’ve noticed many of the respondents seem to think that having a packed schedule means they are smarter than their parents. Typical of the arrogance she spoke of in the article. Just because you are BUSY, doesn’t mean you are smart or capable of problem solving. Not only are attention span shorter but young people increasingly have trouble writing on an adult level. I know someone who worked in HR for Philly school district and she saw firsthand how college grads couldn’t even submit resumes and applications that were appropriate for their level of education. Young people today dont even encounter a lot of correct grammar usage because they dont read books or periodicals. They read slang on Facebook and in text messages. Kids today know how to TEST better and get into college- that doesn’t mean they have the basic skill set or problem solving abilities they they should have when they graduate HS. The parents of this generation have put their kids on a pedastal and its reflected in the hostile, self righteous responses some HS students have posted on here…

  • Kate

    I’m sorry, but this just isn’t true. I learned how to use technology and analyze data in my AP Biology class junior year that my mom didn’t see until she was a graduate student. I’m currently rehashing a paper on population ethics that I first wrote for a summer college course. When I have time to read, I make a point of reading in German. My dad has been trying for months to get me to drop from Calc BC to Calc AB so I’ll get a proper night’s sleep. And you know what? That’s pretty normal among my acquaintances/friends (and before I’ve even touched on clubs). We’re all very socially active and extremely adept intellectually. With one exception, I don’t know anyone who texts more than 75-100 times a day or spends much more time on the internet than is required for research/reading. Please don’t make these generalizations about an entire generation based entirely on your son.

    PS- We’re learning about fairness in writing in my college composition class. We’ve all been taught to avoid the ad hominem fallacies, generalizations, and circular reasoning that apear in this article. Not trying to be insulting, but if we have our flaws…

  • Abraham

    What an amazing and thought provoking article. I have had these same thoughts for years now and seeing them so eloquently displayed in this article was so refreshing. I really hope more people and especially those with authority, realize these issues and do something to stop the bleeding. We need to learn how to effectively utilize technology instead of allowing it to turn us into soul lacking addicts. Thank you so much for putting in the time and effort to research and write about this topic.

  • Mary

    As a student in an all girls high school, where there is a 100% college attendance and an A- is considered not very good, i feel that this article , referring to kids as “stupid” is completely unfair. Did you forget to leave out the good amount of kids that do actually enjoy reading? Or the fact that it’s the adult that teach the kids these things. The adults that show us the movies, not the kids. And shouldn’t a child know well before school the days of the week? I feel the word “stupid” is unfair to the kids who do try and are not glued to screens. And another thing, where do kids get ipods and iphones? Yes, adults. It’s the not the kids’ fault!!!!!

  • Sandra

    The bit about the 6-day schedule resonated with me. I’m 46 but I remember having a 6-day schedule back in Jr. High and commenting with my friends that it had become difficult to remember what day of the week it was – but we always knew if it was day 4 or day 5. Of course, we didn’t have cell phones so we could usually remember if it was Wednesday if we tried hard enough.

  • S

    your son does not know the days of the week? really? sounds like a parenting fail if i’ve ever heard one.

  • S

    your son does not know the days of the week? really? sounds like a parenting fail if i’ve ever heard one.

  • jas

    Lol, you really got the megan’s and Connors all riled up. They seem to think filing theor day with an endless stream of make work means they are ‘smart.

    They miss the entire point of the article. It would be more impressive if they did one thing, really well, not name a long list of 20 minute scheduled resume padding BS.

  • Devon

    I’m a kid (at least I think I count as one), and I’m pretty damn smart. I know the days of the week in four different languages. I read a book a week. And I loved The Great Gatsby–“So we beat on, boats against the current, borne ceaselessly into the past.” Love that line. Maybe the one most meaningful sentence ever writ.

    Are there idiots amongst my fellow high school and college students? You better believe it. But the rumors of Generation Y’s demise have been, to paraphrase Mark Twain, greatly exaggerated. Are there plenty of self-absorbed, anti-intellectual, vacuous, whorish, fame-driven, disrespectful punks? Of course, and MTV surely isn’t helping by perpetuating that machine. But the more I reach out to my peers, the more I’m surprised at how many are far more intelligent and intellectually curious than I’d given them credit for. Then again, this is for “Philadelphia” magazine, and that city is just a black hole of culture, independent thought, and ingenuity. Back in New York, we actually reward hard work and creativity, so there may be a bit of a culture divide here.

  • jon

    This is nothing new. Technology has always dumbed the masses down. There are still some older Professors around who can tell you about the pre and post calculator days and how their students were affected. It gets scarier when the tail end of each generation start teaching in schools. Public schools used to be fine. Nowadays they are systematically brainwashing and retarding children. Enjoy your snooze.

  • jon

    This is nothing new. Technology has always dumbed the masses down. There are still some older Professors around who can tell you about the pre and post calculator days and how their students were affected. It gets scarier when the tail end of each generation start teaching in schools. Public schools used to be fine. Nowadays they are systematically brainwashing and retarding children. Enjoy your snooze.

  • alex

    This is the second long, rather dense article I’ve read recently that bemoans our increasing inability to read long dense articles. (The other was in Psychology Today) I thought this was just a little ironic. Good read though. I guess my brain is a dinosaur.

  • Greg

    To overgeneralize an ENTIRE generation of people based on your child, who by the way, is “dumb” because of you. You allow him to play World of Warcraft, force him to go outside, etc. (do not blame your son’s incompetence as a result of my generation, thank you!) and a select few students of one high school. To go as far as to say that the youth of today are a spawn of ignorance is to sink to the level of those you so “righteously” accuse. I do however, notice a lack of actually citation in your essay. Your comments on direct depression from technological use is misinterpreted. (See http://www.switched.com/2009/02/04/technology-leads-to-anxiety-and-depression-studies-show/) Depression is either caused from an abundance of stress or a pre-existing condition. While there are the stereotypical teenagers of today, the reincarnation of idols such as Paris Hilton, but there are, in quite an abundance, those of us looking to preserve knowledge and rhetoric in hopes of sparing the names of our generation. There are plenty of us who would every once in awhile to quite frequently like to pick up a book, to listen to artist that aren’t “Ke$ha”, or “Lady Gaga”. There are the creative thinkers of…

  • Shelley

    It’s funny that people are getting so defensive about what is really an obvious truth. We DON’T require as much of our students these days as people used to require. As a teacher, I can tell you that students DON’T have basic knowledge. I had to teach my 8th graders what a proper noun was. Go to a bookstore and look at an English textbook from before 1960. The level of intellectualism required of students of that period FAR surpasses what is required of them today.

  • Shelley

    The argument that time spent doing homework equates to the academic rigor of the work is fallacious. Just because something takes you a long time to complete does not mean that it is difficult, it means that YOU do not have the skills or the focus necessary to complete the task in a timely manner. When I was a nanny, I watched the teenage daughters of my family spend HOURS on their homework. In between checking their e-mail, updating their FB status, IMing with 4 friends, and changing the songs on their iTunes. Time taken to complete a task just speaks to the individual’s skills, not to the difficulty of the task. A 500 page book might take you several days to finish, but it takes my Ph.D. student friend a few hours. You’ll have to come up with a better argument if you want to convince someone that you are actually being challenged in school.

  • Melinad

    Its unfair to say all kids don’t know the days of the week. believe it or not…MOST DO. Why is it made a generalization? I’m not your son.

  • Elisa

    Dear Sandy,

    Interesting article, but the media plays an important role in educating children too, and challenging the education system.

    Recently, I visited my 11-year-old cousin. We read a quiz in one of the Fall editions of Philadelphia Magazine (I think, I’m not sure) about whether you’re “smarter than a 5th grader?” Or “smarter than an 11th grader”? I can’t remember at this point. Anyway, one of the questions asked was “Which one is not a continent?” The options were: North America, Australia, China, and (I think) Europe. Behind the page we had all the answers, it said “China.” Though I was first confused, I was later appalled that a MAGAZINE absolutely believes that North American and Australia and entirely a continent each! And my cousin, of course, believes it because it’s the media! You would know, right? But of course, I didn’t buy it. Perhaps I didn’t because I was educated in another country, which, btw, also needs education reform. Yet most of my teachers went above and beyond the approved curriculum and encouraged us to challenge official versions. So did our parents. So it’s not a question of how many hours kids spend playing computer games (I used to spent…

    • thinkitover

      North America and Australia are continents.

  • Claudia

    I’m a psychology student, and this article is consistent with many studies I’ve read (The How of Happiness and Stumbling on Happiness both tackle how the brain processes information). What’s happening is kids are using less frequently the part of their brains that teach how to think, so that they can move on to something more pleasurable to them. Imagine a lumberjack from the 1860’s is suddenly allowed access to a powerful chainsaw. No one could disagree that the muscles in his arms and shoulders would become less toned if he started using the electric saw instead of the heavy axe. The brain works the same way – it is a muscle too. Finding an answer to a homework assignment on Google that took less than one minute to locate does not constitute much mental exercise. As a result, the brain forgets the information for what is a higher priority. The priorities of most children are finishing the unpleasant task of homework and getting on to something more pleasurable – like a video game. In this Information Age, information is not knowledge – even Albert Einstein would tell you that.

    • thinkitover

      Absolutely right, not to mention that when you Google an answer what you get may fall quite short of the truth. With few critical thinking skills kids have no ability to sort through what they “learn” on the internet.

  • Claudia

    For those who disagree with the article, you would be more credible if you didn’t have such atrocious grammar. Here are some helpful tips: the first letter of each word in a sentence is capitalized. Names of countries and languages like English are also capitalized. You’re helping to make the author’s point if you can’t communicate intelligently.

    • thinkitover

      Thank you!! I have been amazed at the lack of attention to spelling and grammar in the replies.

  • Allison

    English classes are meant for reading, not watching movies. Sandy Hingston says her son never read a book in his high school or college classes. And she believes kids are getting stupider. If teachers are not allowing kids to read books, then kids are getting stupider, but it’s not their fault. If an English teacher doesn’t allow for an English class to read books, then how are kids ever going to get smarter?
    I am in tenth grade and I have never watched a movie instead of reading a book, and I am glad for that. I could have never learn as much as I do by watching a movie over reading a book. I not only learn lessons from the book, but new words and new styles of writing that you cannot get that from watching a movie.
    And most kids, when given the opportunity to sit in a dark classroom and watch a movie, take up on the chance to sleep. So how are kids going to get any smarter if the teacher isn’t giving them a chance to try? If all English classrooms around the world read books instead of watching…

  • Allison

    English classes are meant for reading, not watching movies. Sandy Hingston says her son never read a book in his high school or college classes. And she believes kids are getting stupider. If teachers are not allowing kids to read books, then kids are getting stupider, but it’s not their fault. If an English teacher doesn’t allow for an English class to read books, then how are kids ever going to get smarter?
    I am in tenth grade and I have never watched a movie instead of reading a book, and I am glad for that. I could have never learn as much as I do by watching a movie over reading a book. I not only learn lessons from the book, but new words and new styles of writing that you cannot get that from watching a movie.
    And most kids, when given the opportunity to sit in a dark classroom and watch a movie, take up on the chance to sleep. So how are kids going to get any smarter if the teacher isn’t giving them a chance to try? If all English classrooms around the world read books instead of watching…

  • John

    I am a high school teacher. While I may not agree with the article in its entirety, there are parts that ring very true. High school students that I teach are a digital generation that has become dependant on the continuous instantaneous input coming from a vast array of digital devices. As to the question of literacy that depends on the individual. An example of thsi is the collpase of printed news. How many of you readers now get your news from digital snippets found on your web based home pages. Students may not be “stupider” but certainly egocentric to the point of not being social or having enough educational ethic to complete “old” school learning. If not why are so many schools not meeting their annual academic requirements?

  • Martin

    First let’s deal with Tony’s comment at the top. To see the whole article in one block — easy! — just click on Print Article. But thanks for illustrating what this article is talking about.

    Sandy, your article isn’t just good, it’s brilliant. And you’ve hit the nail on the head, albeit in passing rather than as the central idea. You say about Facebook et al.: “…what even we forget … is that none of this is accidental. Big thinkers at big corporations dream this stuff up, test it, tweak it, perfect it, not to make it easier for us to find old friends, but to gather information about our behavior and make money off of it.” And you’re absolutely right.

    But the process goes way beyond fragmenting and wasting our time. Pretty much everything consumed by the American public — such as electronics (cellphones, mp3 players), religion, processed “food” (if you can still call it that), pharmaceuticals, right-wing propaganda (Fox News!), our unbelievably narcissistic Culture of Celebrity that manufactures TV, movies and music, our bought-and-paid-for electoral politics — today all of it is dreamt up by “big thinkers at big corporations” who “dream this stuff…

  • Martin

    …who “dream this stuff up, test it, tweak it, perfect it,” not to make our lives better in any real sense — quite the opposite, in fact (consider the fast-food-driven obesity epidemic, or the widening Republican-driven gap between rich and poor), but to “make money off of it.” I.e., off of us!

    And our kids, because age denies them the critical thinking skills needed to see garbage as it really is, are the corporations’ prime targets. They are being trained to behave like cattle in a feedlot, deliberately kept disorientated and rushing blindly from side to side in response to enticements (“fads”) poked at them through the bars, to milk them of their money.

    Don’t be discouraged by the cattle-sneers about your article (what can you expect from people whose brains have been fried by US culture?) — keep going and write the book! For those readers who cant wait, start with “The Culture of Narcissism” by Christopher Lasch.

  • Pete

    How could the Penn faculty say with a straight face that playing video games demonstrates managing complex systems? That quote will have people rolling on the floor in 20 years. If you want kids to truly use technology to manage complexity, then how about having them program a video game instead of playing one? Most kids today are NOT technology literate. They can’t create anything with their technology. Being literate means a command of the language, in this case Objective C, Java… and so on.

  • Logan

    I’ve never seen a more ungrounded, half assed assessment of anything that I have ever read. You see such a small percentage of the teen population and you accent that as if it resembles the entire generation. I am 16 years old, I play video games and use facebook, but I read, I have read Crime and Punishment, The Iliad, the Odyssey, Count of Monte Cristo, Owen Meany, Gatsby, Le Mis, and countless others. Can you, Sandy Hingston, tell me who wrote the prince, who Carnegie sold his gigantic steel company too? Because I cannot tell you who Snookie is, or anything about Twilight, but I can tell you how to create a buffer in a solution of Hydrobromic acid to maintain a stable pH of 5.4, or how to properly research a generation to get accurate data when writing an article for a prominent magazine.

  • Logan

    This is merely a reaction against something that you do not understand. I suggest that everyone who agrees that Sandy Hingston speaks the truth, open your eyes to change. Sandy Hingston is a bad parent, that is why her kids do not know the days of the week, that is unless she misquoted her son when he simply lost track of what day it was, something that happens to every person. Do you realize that your parents said the same thing about you? Their parents before them?
    On the other hand, your quiz is more insulting that your Article. Those 15 kids you interviewed were either all female, or handpicked to show how “out of it” our generation is. I can guarantee that I can find 3 adults for every 1 highschooler who cannot name our WWII allies.

    Ps. that ap english media course your son takes, is a joke. I wish I hade an Ap course so easy, for an idiot who does not know anything “according to his mother” to get an A? If only

  • J

    As part of this young generation, I don’t think we’re getting dumber. I’ve actually posted about it in my new blog, so I would appreciate it if some people checked it out!

    http://jtache.livejournal.com/

  • justina

    Monday,Tuesday,Wendsday,Thursday,Friday,Saturday,Sunday.( Days of the week.) There are 12 months in a year. Jan, Feb, Mar,Ap,May,June,July,Aug,Sept,Oct,Nov,Dec. Your child is stupid. I’m in the 10th grade. Your the adult, TEACH HIM. I don’t think its the teachers fault eitheir. IT’S YOURS. WHAT DID YOU TEACH HIM. If your such a big article writer why you didn’t teach your son anything.? It’s not all teens fault…..It’s the adults. They show us the way….We learn from them, I bet you bought him a i pod.He uses it and it brain washes him. BECAUSE OF YOU. Don’t EVER my that accusation to all kids because of your child’s dum ass.Some of us want to make it in life. Bill Gates did it (Microsoft inventor,you say computers get you nowhere) (if your son didn’t know)I damn as well can myself. Maybe your stupid.

  • Russell

    The cultural submersion of children into the internet and other technology is just exposing them to differing options and more ideas than would have ever been accessible in the past. You call us ignorant, but it just looks like another case of the even more ignorant “kids these days” speech. I’m 16. I shouldn’t have to tell you to grow up.

  • Russell

    The cultural submersion of children into the internet and other technology is just exposing them to differing options and more ideas than would have ever been accessible in the past. You call us ignorant, but it just looks like another case of the even more ignorant “kids these days” speech. I’m 16. I shouldn’t have to tell you to grow up.

  • Jeffrey

    The kneejerk reaction of so many of these comments might be good enough documentation to prove the assertions of the article. I have taught high school for more than ten years. Here are a few though

  • Kendall

    We just thought you would be interested in a unique marriage between hard copy (napkins) and soft copy (blog). After all, it’s really all about promoting literacy in the family. Our story is at http://www.kendalldaddo.blogspot.com

    KD
    ~j~

  • dly

    I am speaking on behalf of most teenagers when I say ADULTS spend just as much time on facebook. We are not stupid and mindless. I am 12 years old and about to finish my 150 page novel. Yes, some children are like that, but the majority are almost as smart of you adults. Next time, don’t aim this towards the majority of people. WE ARE NOT MINDLESS AND STUPID.

  • Sara

    I am not quite fourteen years old. I do not have a facebook account; I know who invented pasteurization; I know who the Speaker of the house is. I do not watch television or movies at all. I read. I am about to start reading Moby DIck, because I want to.
    It isn’t your son’s fault that his school watches videos rather than reading books; your feelings there would be better directed at the school system.

  • kayla

    well i dont beleive that we are getting stupid! im a senior in HS in PA and i find this offensive! my math teacher doesnt teach a thing! when one of us has a question she says look in the back of the book. and thay she’s the last resort? how are we gonna learn if our teachers dont teach? also we were doing online practices and she didnt know how to do the problem! what is this teaching world coming to? we’re not getting stupid. our teachers are!

    • thinkitover

      A senior in AP English who doesn’t think they are stupid should capitalize I and know that contractions have apostrophes. They should also know that you begin a sentence with a capital letter. I am sorry your teachers are not giving you the opportunities you deserve to excel.

  • Rayshell

    This is quite interesting to me, because i think that this is very true to our society today. My younger brother has trouble reading and understand books but he can easily tell me about the zombies he killed on his Ipod. Although not all is to blame on technology today. When i was younger and even to this day my mother puts restrictions on the amount of technology i can use per day. I understand that people are upset about the “invasion” of technology but the truth is that without our parents buying it for us and not putting restrictions on it, who is really the blame? I sometimes think that parents and other adults have to find someone else to blame for their lack of parenting. I hope that nobody takes this the wrong way but in the end is it ever the other persons fault. I was raised to look in the mirror befor you look around you.

  • Rayshell

    You are very right, not all children or teens are like that. Just because one teenager is slacking does not mean we all are. Look at the full picture, there are still a lot of students who love to read. I am currently in an Advance English class and a Sophomore in High School and I just finished analyzing philosophy which is something most people don’t do until college. I have to strongly disagree with this article because of this. I know, it is often hard for adults to realize that sometimes their kids like to slack. Yes, i agree the teachers should make the students read but also the child should go home at night and want to read and learn.

  • Rayshell

    You are very right, not all children or teens are like that. Just because one teenager is slacking does not mean we all are. Look at the full picture, there are still a lot of students who love to read. I am currently in an Advance English class and a Sophomore in High School and I just finished analyzing philosophy which is something most people don’t do until college. I have to strongly disagree with this article because of this. I know, it is often hard for adults to realize that sometimes their kids like to slack. Yes, i agree the teachers should make the students read but also the child should go home at night and want to read and learn.

  • sabrina

    We don’t know the most basic stuff. I think that technology is makeing us more dumber. Insteed of going and finding the information by ourselves we find it by the internet. so we dont learn as much. And dont get me started on texting. People who text none stop over the summer when they get back to school when they write they use texting words. How Stupid.

  • Damani

    I think she’s just mad because her son doesn’t know how many days are in a week. A.k.a, this article is just about him, how stupid he is, and how sad she is that she’s unable to fix it. Trust me, since your kid can’t get into college, you must have no clue what other schools are doin. He got an A- in an english class not knowing the days in a week? Yea, he’s in special ed miss.

  • Natalie

    You ought to stop trolling.
    This is the most ridiculously biased and subjective article impersonating fact and objectiveness that I have every had the displeasure of reading. In fact, there were so many opinionated statements that I could not bother to waste my time reading a scantily “researched” article, if you could even call it one.
    If your son watched movies all year preparing for the AP Literature test, I doubt he would even get a 1 on the test. And guess what, you get a 1 just for writing your name on the test. With no reading comprehension or essay practice, there is NO WAY that he would be prepared for the test, which is all reading comprehension of college-level literature and 3 essays on college-level reading, one of which is on a novel the student presumably read in advance.

    • thinkitover

      I believe that was her point, she is distressed that the school considered watching movies to be adequate teaching and adequate preparation for the AP test as well as being concerned that his community college course was the same.

  • Jay

    Just because we can Google information does not mean we don’t learn it. Do you know what 30 grays can do to you? Do you even know what a gray is? A gray is the scale in which radioactive gamma rays are measured. I bet you didn’t know that. I am fourteen, and I ask; where did you get these assumptions from? I use the internet, I use facebook, and I use games consoles. I have seen that people who use these things more -in my school- do better than those who don’t. I understand Shakespeare absolutely, and I don’t even have to read the notes.
    90% of all students I know read. 95% of all students I know put more time into work and lesson than their social life. That means they are anti-social for not talking to other people.
    Make up your mind.
    Just because teenagers who are naturally inept at learning make a more perceptible mark, does not mean the quantity of us silent ones are exactly the same. You wouldn’t agree with me stereotyping adults as dispassionate. Why label us as unintelligent, when you don’t like being labelled either?

  • Heather

    This article is extremely offensive, you act like all kids act like your son, not ALL kids are to dumb to know the day of the week, or the months or how to use a ruler! You also have no right to not say that we are human beings, just because kids tend to use the computer more doesn’t mean we’re not human, its like if I said adults read to much so they are not human, kids tend to know more by the end of their years in middle school than high school graduates did 50 years ago! i am an avid reader and have been reading at college level since 3rd grade, I don’t get home til 7 some days because of my involvement in my school play as an actress and a costumer, I go t bed at 9 o’clock every night I have a facebook page with less than a hundred friends, and am taking all advanced classes with plenty of reading.

  • Ameila

    As a high school teacher, I see teenagers actually LACKING social interaction, as a direct result of Facebook and cell phones. “Our kids don’t ever have to be alone…and yet they are always alone.” “They sit alone at home and count their “friends”. How very sad.

  • Jeremiah

    I hates to say this, but they’re right. We’re getting more and more stupid every generation. Yet the article only refers to America. So what about the rest of hte world?

  • Jeremiah

    I hates to say this, but they’re right. We’re getting more and more stupid every generation. Yet the article only refers to America. So what about the rest of hte world?

  • Jeremiah

    I hates to say this, but they’re right. We’re getting more and more stupid every generation. Yet the article only refers to America. So what about the rest of hte world?

  • Jeremiah

    I hates to say this, but they’re right. We’re getting more and more stupid every generation. Yet the article only refers to America. So what about the rest of hte world?

  • Jeremiah

    I hates to say this, but they’re right. We’re getting more and more stupid every generation. Yet the article only refers to America. So what about the rest of hte world?

  • Jeremiah

    I hates to say this, but they’re right. We’re getting more and more stupid every generation. Yet the article only refers to America. So what about the rest of hte world?

  • Jeremiah

    I hates to say this, but they’re right. We’re getting more and more stupid every generation. Yet the article only refers to America. So what about the rest of hte world?

  • Jeremiah

    I hates to say this, but they’re right. We’re getting more and more stupid every generation. Yet the article only refers to America. So what about the rest of hte world?

  • anonymoous

    All they want us to do is pay attention to the ads on the side. u really need provide more sources before going around and making a 9 page aricle on seseless crap.

  • Melinda

    You have a major part in your child’s education. Why don’t you become more involved? The judgments and assumptions you make are absolutely ridiculous. Not all teenagers are your son. Honestly, I don’t know where you get off saying such things. Ignorance can be dangerous.

  • Lilly

    First of all, we run on a six day cycle on a five day week. It changes in addition to holidays and test schedules. Secondly, not all English classes are like that. This article does not exemplify anything about Cheltenham. We are in the top schools in the nation. This is not us.

  • Trent

    Alright… this is just ignorant. I’m 17 I will say, I enjoy classic tales, War of the Worlds, All Quiet on the Western Front, Of Mice and Men, ect ect, I play games, I text, I use facebook, I’m an active musician (guitar for 9 years, just starting in 2011 as a producer). I work as a productive member of society, I have job, and I use respect and courtesy in my every day routine. I’m sorry if no one got the expected “lolwut dude ur so crzy kidz r fine.” Think before you generalize.

  • Mike

    As a 14 year old boy receiving an average Catholic education, I can tell you that children today are busier than ever, juggling sports events, music lessons, home, school and maintaining a social life is exhausting, and there is little time for fun. I think you need to realize that not all children are degenerates like your son, and unlike you, most parents know how to raise a child. This article is made up of nothing more than outrageous assumptions and convenient statistics. I am disappointed in Philadelphia Magazine for making this a featured article.

  • Yohan

    I see it in my nephews – a complete inability to preform even the most mundane tasks. I wholeheartedly disagree with the oblivious angry teenagers who believe that there is an education system now-a-days… modern youth have been coddled and have been rewarded for mear participation, so its only natural for them to ‘demand the bar be lowered again’ when things get too hard for them… ‘adapting’ to these ‘new thinkers’ is another expression of ‘jettisoning standards to accomodate kids who would be called stupid otherwise… ‘

  • ASdfg

    This article, quite frankly, frightens me. It’s not only the content, but the fact that this was actually published under the name of journalism. I don’t see any attempt at propper referenceing of any legitimate studies, I see opion supported by other peoples opinion. In my own opinion, a journalist is supposed to provide facts supporting their arguement, and to let their readers chose to agree or disagree with the point they’re making. This article simply assaulted us with opinion, which I found reminiscent of a preacher or evangelist.

  • Kaye

    I am delighted by the number of teens who commented on this article because it means one thing-they read it. I teach high school students who absolutely refuse to read. I read to them or have them follow along with audio books. Having them read out loud is embarrassing and painful for all of us. A fellow teacher had a question on a test with the phrase, “What conclusions can you draw from this?” and the student answered the question by drawing pictures. I found this article, obviously some time after it was published, after a particularly trying day. Apathy runs rampant in high schools. It is refreshing to read the comments of the high school students who posted here. They are literate. I do not teach EC children, yet typical writing from the teens I teach looks like this, “i wuz wit my cuzin an we wuz like going to Dizney world cuz we like it alot an there rides are fun an are familys go there to.” I teach and reteach. Teach and reteach. And teach again. It hurts my heart.

  • Nia

    Being 14, i have seen plenty of idiots in my short life. So to me it seems that kids are really get stupid. i personally read a lot, and when i found out that most the kids in my class don’t even read. So when i was the first to finish To Kill A Mockingbird, half of those kids asked me to tell them what happens. It is rediculous.

  • WinterS

    I can’t believe she actually wrote this! She writes this whole article but uses her son as the “stupid generation” example. She doesnt even back up her statements as shown on page 4 when she says”Maybe Kids aren’t stupider at all” (stupider isnt a word btw)”I need to talk to more kids Jakes Age before i decide.She hasnt decided yet? why write the article then? Just sayin…

  • Harley

    You are so full of bull crap. I’m a middle school student and your crap is false. What do you expect children to do after school? Do homework for 6 hours and go to bed? A child suffers through an abundant amount of homework, annoying teachers and stressful times. You have the nerve to call us stupid JUST because we use technology?

    • derpington

      but,you are though!

  • Sunsierre

    I just got off the phone with my 14 yo daughter who is sick at home today. She is posting on facebook although this morning I warned her not to. I do not want her friends, nor anyonel else, knowing that she is home alone. She thinks I’m being too protective. So, I read her facebook page. It lists her as married, wtf? The kid listed as her husband isn’t even her boyfriend. So called her for an explanation, she says its her play husband, (whatever). I continued to scroll through her fb page. Her spelling is atrocious. sikk for sick, lykk for like. wtf? She’s an excellent speller, I called her again. She says that’s how you spell in texts and online. It’s not real spelling, it’s not supposed to be(who made up that rule?)I told her she is presenting herself as stupid, she says I just don’t know the rules. She is an A student, knows how to spell and knows the days of the week, the months and she knows history. I daresay, she is smarter than I was at her age. Her memory is phenomena. As a matter of fact all…

  • Mike

    It’s true about the current gen of HS-age kids. I’m not that much older (graduated high school in 2001) and I really see around me much of what this article says. Kids on the average have far shorter attention spans, and it can even be hard to pry them away from their phone or computer screen for even 1 minute.

    I’m a computer programmer, so I am constantly distracted by technology myself. I know what it’s like, but today’s kids are far worse about it than those even 10 years ago.

    One trick I use if I have to write an letter or an essay is that I flip on my OLLLDD 8088 computer from the 1980’s, boot Windows 3.0 and type it entirely in “Write”. Distractions are gone, it has no real internet capability. When done, I put it on a floppy and print it out on a modern computer.

    I know that sounds ridiculous, but damn it really does work well!

  • Sagitta

    I wondered why my 5th grade daughter was failing math tests. I started reviewing with her and for some questions she could not answer she asked me how to do them. I looked at the questions and said, “These are measurements, you have to use a ruler.” She said, “Oh, Ok.” I asked her how she got the first answer and she didn’t know. I asked her if she knew how to use a ruler to measure and guess what–she said “No.” I was shocked, because this was a basic skill I remember learning in 2nd grade!! So, now I have to spend a weekend teaching my kid how to read a ruler after I paid a my taxes for a public education system to do nothing! It’s not that kids are too distracted by cable tv, and cell phones. It’s that teachers are too damn lazy to teach the kids anything!!

    • Jen

      Before you go calling teachers lazy, I STRONGLY suggest you get your ass into the average public school classroom and see just how much bureaucratic red tape they have to wade through and how many kids are sent to school parents who haven’t even given them basic lessons in manners and how to act like a human being. These days, parents just drop their kids off at the door and expect the teacher to raise them.

    • thinkitover

      The bigger problem is that the curriculum no longer favors that sort of learning. I have had more than one teacher that couldn’t tell me what the purpose of the curriculum outcomes was. They didn’t care either, the deal was that certain things had to be done certain ways even if they made no sense. This is a soul killing way to have to teach. Add in a class of 30 where at least 8 are on individual lesson plans and the need to teach things that are really parental responsibilities (like manners and morals) and many teachers, even good ones, have thrown in the towel. We need to overhaul our education systems completely and allow teachers to do what they used to … teach.

  • dili

    That people responsible for designing learning programs have accepted the public school as a socializing exercise? When somebody says that the book was way better than the movie, how many people in the room bothered to read the book? In the final analysis, reading allows us to imagine for ourselves what movies predigest for us. Kids that blame previous generations are short sighted to the idea that there may have been a concerted effort to stupefy the population through the public schools. When you listen to an ad on the radio or watch a commercial, do you feel smarter? If you answer yes to that, maybe you should consider that flattery is not always truth, and in your case especially truth is probably not flattering. Read more books. Listen to musical permutations, classical or otherwise. Flex your brain with purpose. Do not deceive yourself, just because you are smart and focussed doesnt mean your classmates have not been zolofted into a neurotoxic digital prison. The good news is every problem contains it’s own solution and every person can find their center. The catch is…do they think it worth the bother?

  • Aya

    I don’t think that the intelligence level of the younger generation is the main issue. There have always been groups in society who simply couldn’t pull the intellectual weight that others could. What IS of concern, though, is the way the younger generation is beginning to act. Morality seems to have died. Thinking things through and considering consequences is simply no longer done. I don’t know if this is the work of technology, or the increasing “liberality” of our society, but quite frankly, it’s worrying.

    (Note: I more or less belong to the generation that this article discusses.)

  • Kim

    As a 27-year-old, I have to call “bullcrap” on this article. The fact that your son was in an AP English class and doesn’t even know all seven days of the week is your responsibility, not the younger generation’s. Also, no high school would allow someone to even enroll in an AP course without knowing something simple as the days of the week. Maybe you should stop blaming the younger individuals and help your son for a change.

    • Mortskab

      Say bullshit, you wuss.

  • Heather

    Though I find many comments in this article to have no referenced merit, I have to agree with the overall theme that the next generation is becoming dumber. I believe this is due to laziness. I teach at a community college and students want you to tell them exactly what is on the test now. They won’t study to save their life…it is really scary!

    • EnglishTeacher

      I am witnessing a sharp increase in students who are either unable or unwilling to actually process text. They cannot make inferences or understand allusions. Unless something is explicitly stated, they can’t determine any deeper layers of meaning. Regardless of if this is attributable to laziness or inability, the lack of higher concept thinking skills will ultimately result in the U.S. becoming less and less competitive, and our standard of living will decline. If everyone is on welfare, there is no one to support the welfare system – what happens then?

      • Mr A.B Normal :)

        Have you notice that many of the people on here either haven’t read the article or can grasp deeper meanings of articles? Not everything has to be proven in a lab.

        Some of the most real things are what we CAN’T see with our senses.

  • Cristian

    Just Because kids Don’t want to learn doesn’t mean we’re stupid. Which is exactly was this stupid article is trying to say.

    • derpington

      YES IT DOES

    • Jason

      Excellent use of punctuation and capitalization.

    • Zak

      Shut up ! You’re stupid; you speak of yourself using “they” then “we” on the same sentence … You must have some serious mental problems to be unable to speak a single sequence correctly in your own langage. USA is really the shittiest country in modern world

    • thinkitover

      Actually it kinda does. The desire to learn is integral to intelligence.

  • dave

    There are plenty of smart kids. The authors kid is just a moron and so they think all kids must also be idiots. It’s fine; all it means is smart people will continue to be able to take advantage of stupid people. That’s the way it should be.

  • LYK

    I’m not trying to insult you but your son needs to see a doctor. I’m 11 and studies in a gifted youth course studying differential equations and literary criticisms. So high school junior doesn’t know the days of the week? Wow.
    You claim kids don’t read? I learnt to read when I was 2, and since then I still read a book every day. I think reading’s fun and you learn stuff. WTF is happening to your son?
    The Internet is harmful? I got my entire knowledge of politics and court on the internet, like lex loci and the Constitution amendments.The internet I think is like a bank of knowledge. What your son is doesn’t mean everyone is like that.
    I’m sorry but your article gets a big fail. If your son is mentally retarded doesn’t mean that all kids are. I’m sorry that your son has an IQ 4 times lower than mine, but instead of whining like a 3-year-old it’s YOUR responsibility to educate him.Your article has insulted about 200 millions kids around the world already.

    • thinkitover

      Most of the young people posting have relied on faulty spelling and grammar and used insult and hyperbolic language to make their point. In my opinion this only reinforces what the author of the article was saying. How can so many kids in accelerated programs not know how to spell or construct full sentences? and the fact that they honestly believe that simply calling the author’s son retarded is in any way a cognizant argument against her premise is a strong indication that she is right about the effects of technology on the ability to think critically and on social skills.

      • A 13 year old child

        For a grammar Nazi your first sentences uses and instead of commas for a list, your last sentence starts with an uncapitalized “and”, and it is a run on.

        • dumb A@@

          Very true but a sentence shouldn’t start with “and” as well. The point of the article was to broaden ones concept of how we all view the common day world and to think critically of our own view point. It obviously struck a nerve and therefore was a success. Intelligence can not be viewed from a single perspective such as grammar or a test, it comes from a broad range of ones interactions, experiences, and knowledge retained from them one can identify and utilize/expand on in life.
          .

    • Georgie

      You have proved the author’s point in your response to the article. You shoot insults, with no tangible feedback. You provide no statistical data, yet the author did. This is exactly the point the author made about your generation’s actions and attitudes towards everything internet. You assume no accountability. My son is almost 12 and has tested gifted for years, but just like most other millennials, he is addicted to the internet. Fortunately, he’s a big reader; lots of books. I try very hard to pretty him away, often limiting his access, otherwise, he does little else. He was never like this until he spent all summer at his dad’s, sitting on the computer; he was sucked in. Now, I find value in the internet, but just like anything it should be used in moderation, and logically. People, and we’re not just talking children here believe what they read without checking sources. Used haphazardly, the internet will turn children into the dumbest smart people. What I mean by that is that they’ll be really smart at just a few select things; primarily computer related, but won’t have a clue about the things that really get them through the day, week, month, year, or life. Too many teens have failure to launch issues because they stress about going out on their own. My aunt bragged incessantly about how intelligent her daughter was, but she has very few physical friends, is out of shape, doesn’t know how to socialize in person, is on depression medication and is scared to begin life as an adult. I’m a child mentor and this scenario is repeating itself over and over again. I have two cousins in their late 20s and one of them was so technology driven, he’s the one with social anxiety, has zero charisma, and is awkward. I don’t want any of this for my son. The studies, articles, social media, and the actions of today’s millennials has solidified that throttling my son’s internet usage and encouraging him to have physical hobbies is the greatest gift I can give him to secure a healthy future.

    • rogun

      As a kid, you need to realize that it’s not your fault. That doesn’t mean the author is wrong, and I don’t think she is wrong, but the problem is with how we adults raise our children.

    • Pnaut

      Bingo! “Is the internet making our kids stupid?” No the generation before them is, anything wrong with your kid is YOUR fault, that’s what you narcissistic baby boomers are trying to avoid by writing these rationalizations all over the place.

    • Thëo

      May I suggest something sir. I’m 12. YOU’RE 14. I HAVE AN album coming out (metal), novels I write constantly, am in. I’m in honors as well. I don’t believe in pulverizing people in the internet, for it is a very fallacious place full of fabrications. I’m not saying that you are being deceitful, but you are being inconsiderate with your foul and callous position on this poor poor boy. Arrogance is not the answer, my friend. I’m sure you have a magnitude of high intellectual intelligence, but the only way to prove that is living your life well.

  • jourge

    i bet you kids these days are smarter than your ass

    • derpington

      oh you think so? ok.. Obama. SOPA. Cant use a ruler in 7th grade because the kids are stupid. cant function without a smartphone. the inability to use a phone book. The inability to do ANYTHING without a phone in their hand. KIDS ARE DUMB NOWADAYS.. oh yeah, justin beaver also…yeah thanks for that and THANKS FOR TWILIGHT YOU YOUNG SHITS

      • Meike

        Really? News flash, we can do things without a smartphone, and use a ruler. Not to mention, it was mostly your generation that made some of the things you mentioned. Adults, mostly the last generation, elected Obama. We didn’t write Twilight, someone your age did, some tweenage girls just fangirled over it. Also, I fucking hate Justin Bieber. When SOPA did show up, we did something, and got rid of it. It’s your generation that pushed it. Just because it happened during a generation, doesn’t mean it’s the children of that generation’s fault. One last thing, just because you think something is stupid or silly doesn’t mean you can use it against this generation’s ability to function or their intelligence. Your parents probably felt the same way about whatever you did. Also, *can’t, proper capitalization, and basic grammar. Next time you call people dumb, make sure you don’t look like you didn’t take grade school English.

        • Thëo

          Justin Bieber? What do you listen to the rolling stones? LISTEN TO SOME BETTER MUSIC LIKE OPETH AND ALCEST.

      • Smarties

        I don’t agree with you I happen to be in seventh grade and I can do all the things you just listed and more so please don’t imply that all kids are stupid FYI I don’t even have a phone

        • soni

          i rad this fully and i really enjoyed my itself

          • EnglishTeacher

            Wow! A completely illiterate comment.

          • Michael Paul Ammons

            Please don’t use an exclamation when commenting because it is clearly
            only to be used verbally when one is surprised. It is a pointless
            expression without the visual element. It is inappropriate as a teacher for you to use it this way. It is more appropriate to say, “I was so shocked to see such an illiterate sounding comment posted here.”

        • Thëo

          I don’t have a phone, either.

      • to dhdjd j

        Mr dumb!&!, your generation wrote twilight.
        # Ur stupid
        Also, look up 70s on google, if you know whqt that is, you werent that smart either were you?

  • Steve

    After reading the article and what some commenters have said, I wondered: why do focus on the internet and public schools, and not your own involvment in your kids lives. I’m always told, and i will admit that this is without experiance, that once you have children, a good portion of you life is put on hold in order to assist in the proper upbringing of your child. At the same time, you children are at school for 8 or so hours, and we all have job obligations. but once your kkds are home, who lets them play WoW for 6 hours, who bought them the laptop/tablet/cell phone. Is there a lack of accountability because there is an assumption that you should be able to wholly rely on the school system?

  • A

    Its all what goes on at home and also the schools and teachers. I’m a substitute teacher and I’m in a different classroom everyday in the same school district; one day I will be in a sixth grade class that is advanced for their grade and the next I’ll be in one that doesn’t know how to plot points on a graph. Today I was at a high school and a Junior asked me how to spell the word ‘serious’ and I had to restrain myself from asking him, “Are you serious?” I have noticed, as well as been told by teachers on several occasions, that the standards have gone down. The education system is letting down kids because it is ‘too hard’ to get their attention and their parents are letting them down because they allow too much time on computers and playing games. The unfortunate part about this article is that it is true in a lot of ways, but this is too big of a generalization for all kids since there are PLENTY of them that are very smart and focused. (I won’t even go into the fact that the author’s son doesn’t know the days of the week). The internet is a very useful tool that kids should have access to, and some of the traditional ways of learning are extremely crucial as well. Parents and educators need to find a balance between these things and find a solution NOW instead of focusing on the fact that kids are doomed since they have been on the internet since they were 2-3 years old. One major problem I see is the allowance of having cell phones on campus PERIOD; they should be collected at the beginning of the day or there should be much higher consequences for having them. Smaller faculty to student ratios would help so there would be more one on one time for kids. Even going to the extreme of teaching meditation in schools would help kids quiet their minds a little bit and slow down to take things in. Parents are to blame as well. You can tell the difference between the kids whose parents guide them well and who have the focus to learn and the kids whose parents have used new technologies to pacify their kids so that they don’t have to do as much parenting. Its like the commercials where the mom is grocery shopping and her toddler is watching a movie on an iPad. It is ridiculous; kids do not have to use their imagination anymore. I am 25 years old and I didn’t grow up with the internet, but even since I have had access to it I can see how it effects me. When I sit down and read a book for a few hours I feel great and if I sit on the computer for a few hours I feel like crap. I have been addicted to Facebook and now I limit it because I know that my real physical relationships with my friends and family are much more fulfilling and real. Kids haven’t been given the tools to problem solve like we do, but they also have a very wonderful resource at their fingertips. Some kids have a less of an attention span due to new technologies but it is not their fault. They don’t want to learn and they want instant satisfaction because that is what they get on the computer. The ones spending much time alone with less interaction with their peers outside of Facebook and texting probably have more social anxiety in and outside of the classroom making it much more stressful for them to take in new, important information. We have to remedy this and help ease the minds of these kids!

    • Mr A.B Normal :)

      In the 80s/90s computers were more of learning aids in the days before Facebook and cell phones. Really we have been dumbed down as a result and now all kids play is Call of Duty which came from Doom or Wolfienstein back in the mid 90s that had a lot of occult symbolism.

      We teach our kids we come evolve from monkeys with no moral values and you expect them to act otherwise?

      Four more years and you will no longer recognize America.

      • AnonymousUser

        I’m 24 and I used to play Doom all the time back in the 90s when I was a little kid. I don’t think games like Doom or Call of Duty (I still prefer Doom, btw) are the reason why kids these days are so stupid. I think the real culprit is the culture of anti-intellectualism that is perpetuated by mainstream media. For example, the “ghetto culture” / “pop culture” that so many youngsters nowadays obsess over. They’re more concerned with dressing like clowns and wearing grills in their mouths than they are with getting an education. I know this first hand, because I’m actually from “the ghetto” myself and have faced all kinds of harassment for making the choice not to be an illiterate brute like everybody else in the “hood.” God forbid you use a word with more than two syllables in it while hanging out with your peers, or else you will automatically become the biggest “square” (read: nerd) on the block. It is truly amazing to me how being a drug dealer or gang banger who wears his pants around his ankles, can’t spell “library” and lives off government assistance/illegal narcotics sales is considered to be a much more attractive career choice by American youth than being a highly paid doctor or lawyer without a criminal record who can read and write English. This is the real reason why our society is getting dumber with every generation. What can you do to stop it? Get rid of that TV, that iphone, facebook, and twitter. Lose all these stupid distractions which act as a medium for the spread of anti-intellectualism and ignorance. Get your kids out of public schools and homeschool them instead. Public schools these days are breeding grounds for stupidity and “herd mentality.” Anyone who disagrees with me has obviously never actually lived in the ghetto and probably never even set foot here to know that what I’m saying is 100% accurate. Those of you who are still in the hood trying to raise your families, please be aware of what’s happening out here and how easily your children can get sucked into a lifestyle of violence, stupidity and corruption. All you have to do these days is look up any random urban youth’s profile on facebook and just take a look at the nonsense they post on their walls, take a look at how they dress, the pictures of stupid things they do. All they do is glorify violence, glorify gang-banging, glorify being illiterate, glorify sex, and marginalize anyone who stands up for traditional values! Keep your children away from this junk if you want them to succeed in life!

    • http://www.mrsodie2.com/ Mrs Odie

      You mean larger faculty to student ratios, not smaller. I agree about cell phones. I collect them at the beginning of every period and it is the single most controversial issue on campus. I have had to fight parents, admin, and the Union. Parents WANT their kids to have the phone in their hands every second. It’s usually their mothers texting them!

    • A 13 year old child

      In my school we often use cell phones to look information up. Text books explanations are hard to find and often complete.

  • alpha&omega

    Charlotte Iserbyt is the author of the book; The Deliberate Dumbing Down of America read this and you will know why the kids are so dumb and what you can do to stop it.

  • Devin Platt

    You’re kid does know the months in a year, or the days of the week? He’s a senior in high school? You might want to take him to the doctor. He may be retarded.

    • sjh

      Your, not you’re. You’re is a conjunction of you are.

      • http://www.mrsodie2.com/ Mrs Odie

        If you are going to correct someone else, know what you are talking about. You’re is a contraction, not a conjunction.

  • Jonny

    I totally agree that today’s youth is spending far too much time in front of a computer/smartphone screen. It appears that younger and younger children are being exposed to this lifestyle, for which I place a lot of blame on the parents. Get your kid away from the entertainment and into the real world! It’s so easy to placate them with shiny objects and bright colors, but take some responsibility and do something with your child instead of leaving Facebook to raise them.

    • thinkitover

      It is easier to place them in front of an iPad than to spend time playing with or educating them so that is what most parents do. Kids are in outside activities to a point that family time is non-existent and when they are home they are attached to a device. As long as you can make enough money to keep them supplied parenting today is a no brainer, literally.

      • G

        I have to agree with you. Some people make parenting out to be difficult. It’s not, it’s just a constant effort. It’s a constant struggle to make sure my kid is well rounded and doesn’t get pulled back into the all computer, all the time trap. My son’s dad however, doesn’t monitor like I’d like so I have to retrain my son after every visit. He’s allowed to have only one extracurricular activity which is boy scouts and I’m a leader there so I play a hand in his activities. I want my child to learn to covet down time and not be so busy busy. Cherish hanging in a hammock in the woods, taking a nap, watching critters, reading a book, etc. Also, I would actually like to spend time with him and not have other people being the primary influence in his upbringing.

  • Anonymous

    I found this article to be very offensive. I’m quite sure you’ve been barraged by comments from lots of indignant kids, and, yes, I’m another one of those. I am thirteen years old, and I think I can say that I’m not stupid. The fact is, you’re basing your arguments off of the super-cliched teenager stereotype–being of the angsty, mopey, texting, Facebooking variety.

    I’ve never had a Facebook. I never wanted one. I may spend a lot of time on the computer, but I spend a lot of time reading too, and that’s my own choice. My parents never forced me to. I read because I love reading, and because I like that feeling of knowing things–yes, how socially unacceptable, I like knowing things–and asking things, and for the simple happiness of getting into a new story. Some of my favorites are Sherlock Holmes collections and Ray Bradbury’s short stories. I can get into really technical arguments about Harry Potter. When I grow up, I want to be an author or a teacher. I think Facebook and Twitter are stupid. I worry about my grades. I make fun of Oxford commas.

    So, yes, I suppose I’m what you’d call a geek, but I still have friends, and I don’t necessarily have to engage in chess tournaments to be a well-educated kid, either. I honestly don’t know what you expect from my generation–did you seriously think that most of us don’t know the days of the week, just because your son doesn’t? Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday. And I didn’t even Google it. Wow, I sure am a genius.

    I’m not the only non-idiotic kid out there, you know. There are some kids who really don’t take the time to care about this sort of thing, but I’m not one, and my friends aren’t either. I know lots of decent kids who are ambitious and hardworking and motivated, and their information doesn’t solely stem from quick Internet searches.

    Look, I guess I’m just trying to say that you’re being unfair to many, many kids by posting such a biased article. It’s really not fair of you to say such a thing, acting as though there are no intelligent kids left in the world. And you definitely aren’t the first to express this sort of opinion. I’m really getting tired of hearing how stupid kids are.

    • derpington

      but, they are getting stupider. Look at the facts. They expect an Iphone in their hands from the age of 4. They don’t know how to do anything without a smartphone.

      • Patrick Freedom Eagle Sparks

        Too bad the data indicates kids are smarter

        • AnonymousUser

          Too bad you have obviously never set foot outside and seen the real-world effects of iphones, social media, and the general anti-intellectual culture perpetuated by mainstream media. If you had, you’d see that the average urban youth these days makes the typical youth of the 1950s look like Albert f**king Einstein. Kids are getting dumber, this is a fact. They are not more intelligent today at all. Go on facebook and take a look at what these kids are doing/saying and tell me how much smarter you think they are. Give me a break, bro. You’re either trolling or you live under a f**king rock. Go outside and smell the coffee!

      • A 13 year old child

        How does want for an IPhone relate to being stupid?

        • AnonymousUser

          It’s called “herd mentality.” Everyone wants an iphone so they can “be cool” and “fit in.” They want to be able to access Facebook and Twitter wherever they are, so they can join in with the rest of their peers in lowering their IQs by posting pictures and comments about s**t that bears no relevance to anything.

      • Thëo

        Who wants a smart phone, anyways? I spend my days learning. Socrates did prove a point, although I do dislike most of his philosophy, more grasping towards Hanfeizi who’s theoretical probability is more attainable. (I’m 12. It seems like everyone is putting their age.)

    • AnonymousUser

      The point of this article is that most youngsters these days – not you and others like you – but most youngsters are, in fact, getting dumber with every passing generation. I’m glad that you chose not to sink to their level, acknowledge the fact that Facebook/Twitter/etc is stupid and focused on getting an education. However, you must be aware that most kids your age aren’t like you. Most of them are on Facebook posting pictures of themselves wearing their pants around their ankles, wearing metallic “grills” in their mouths and engaging in all sorts of age-inappropriate behaviors while demonstrating a profound level of illiteracy that is astounding even to people who speak English as their second language (like myself.) You must acknowledge that there is currently an extremely prominent culture of anti-intellectualism in this country – perpetuated by mainstream media/”pop culture”/”ghetto culture” – that is actively marginalizing intelligent youth while making it trendy and popular to be an ignoramus. I applaud you for not succumbing to this elaborate system of “Idiocrat indoctrination” (that’s a reference to the Mike Judge film, Idiocracy, btw. I highly recommend watching it if you haven’t already) but you must acknowledge that many youth are and that this is causing an epidemic of stupidity in America which is rapidly growing more and more out of control.

  • angela Jones

    I am very impressed with article!! I have written a couple papers on the damage that technology can have on education and society.

  • derpington

    heh, I heard they can make up that lost time in the shower with that new waterproof smartphone..

  • Kat

    Well, children is 1-10. Im 11, and being called a child/kid or being called useless or being told to order off a kids menu and being told, “it doesnt matter how fat you are, your reputaion, or how you look your just a kid” is SUPER offensive to me. SO SHUT UP

    • Sami

      I agree

  • Kat

    i gtg take a shower & go 2 work. CYA!!!

  • Ann Pharos

    I also agree with the general idea of this article but I do not agree that Internet is 100% to blame. My kids go to a school where it is mandatory to read books, hand in book reviews and read news papers. Sometimes they have to find old articles or research about history in the Internet. They each have an iPod which they use to help them with their homework when they’re at my parents’ house (they’re 8 and 10 so I don’t let them carry around a laptop yet). So my point is, all technology has its advantage and disadvantage. You have to guide your kids from a very young age and be very selective with the school that you choose for them. As you said, modernization gives too much option so as parents we have to help them decide the right thing. We need to keep a closer watch on our kids as compared to what our parents did when we were young. No body is perfect and believe me, I’m not just saying that. But we do need to train ourselves to be smarter parents and keep our kids interested in intellectual things. After all, babies aren’t born knowing what to do. Parents have to show them.

  • tmt

    I agree with you on the kids will be dumber by the year.
    they wont know how to write because they will do is type and be on phone.
    gosh who ever invented smart phone should have put a age limit on them ha ha

  • tmt

    ive had a kid that was a friend of my sons she was 16 and she asked what a vcr was?
    and this was as she was walking out with one in her arms

  • tmt

    some places in the world girls are not allowed to go to school .
    or else they are killed.
    so you should be lucky to have a bit of education.
    um I would say many people come here to this country because they want a good education.

    • Me

      You are living proof of the problems here.

  • Dan

    A caveman is more intelligent then almost all united states residents. Its not your fault, it is government control. Your intelligence is determined by how you spell, or by proper grammer. Taught things in school that you will rarely ever use while your brain is young and a sponge. Being fed garbled up lies from history. Taught science and advanced math. Things that is useless for most every career out there. Taught that everything that can benifit you is dangerous. Such as killing with barehands, self defense, electrical, mechanical, growing your own garden etc. so basically it causes everyone to rely on technoligy that can be taken away in a second. Making you sheep to easily control. The modern day school system has set back humans 20,000 years.

    • Dan

      Atleast you can do advanced calculas, but you cant wire your own electric box. Hire an electrician.

  • Dan

    I too am self taught. Internet nor tv is to blame for your kids problems. It is either his learning disfunction, or just shitty parents shitty teachers. Or he is depressed from his life and has no motivation. Dont be blaming things for your child neglect.

  • Me

    Just flipped past a music video with Bieber and some tramp (Niki Minaj?)… nothing with a high IQ watches that crap unless they are the ones creating and editing it to make money off the masses of retarded American youth. Yes, American kids are dumber than ever.

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  • rapmakesmevomit

    Young people today are generally speaking dumb as a bag of wet hair.

  • Jake

    Sorry… But this is kinda pathetic. I am a Jr in highschool, and know jrs in highschool. Unlike everyone else, I am NOT going to say your son is an idiot.. I am going to say that that he is an example of a failure on everyone’s parts, but this is mostly his own failure, and failure on the school’s part.

    I am a Jr. In high-school. On an average day, I spend five hours asleap, eight hours at conventional school, one hour either tutoring a classmate or teaching a lower grade student, two hours hanging out with people, two hours on homework, four hours learning material outside of school (Drumline, online music courses, online writing courses, ext.), and two hours on the computer. Very few days are actually like that, the numbers shift, but that is basically my life. The If your son is incapable of using his time and resources, than that is a failure on his part.

    My school as six periods a day, and it is filled with the following: AP Physics, Honors English, History, Pre-Calculus, Weight Training and Drumline. Listing the things I have learned in any one of these classes would be longer than my little “essay” here (Which is in a format I learned in 9th grade). However, to put it simply, I can tell you the EXACT pitch that will be produced by a train horn (given simply the air temperature and it’s speed, and preferably the decibles), can tell you the theme and underlying meanings of six Edgar Allen Poe stories, can tell you the height of anything given a protracter and given I know how far away I am, can recite the constitutional amendments from memory, can bench press my own weight, and play drums on the level of a world class drum corp. If your son’s school simply has him watching movies instead of actually reading, and fails to teach him how to use a protractor, than the educators need to be replaced, because EVERY student in every one of my classes can do the above (Well, match up the class to the feat of course). As both a student and a drum instructor, I can tell you that this is a failure on the educator’s part as well.

  • Derver

    Just today, cleaning up in front of my row house. This 20 something cannot read the parking signs and wants me to figure out and says its ok or not ok for her to park her car. I mean really, a college educated, fashionista gets pissed off with my answer and calls me rude. Just because she didn’t get a response she thought she DESERVED. Really? I simply asked her if she read the sign that was clearly posted? When she said no, I told her read the parking signs. She didn’t like that answer to much too much.. And I’m just so rude! Mehahah. If you are old enough to pass your drivers license, making enough to have a posh phone and drive a new car and are enrolled in penn – read the signs. Too bad about the ticket…maybe mommy will pay it…

    • Mr A.B Normal :)

      Well maybe she is not from the city and comes from a small town or rural area.

      I think they should actually have a *Rural Drivers License* that is much more simpler bu has more restrictions such as you cannot go on freeways/turnpikes unless you have a special sticker that shows you are capable of handling it and you cannot drive faster then 55mph either day or night and for teens you cannot drive when visibility is too low under certain conditions unless you take a simulator course logging you’re hours.

  • Justanotherkid

    This is… Extremely insulting.
    I’m considered a preteen, yet even I am smarter then that. It’s true, I’m on technology for a large portion of my time, but I read books from the young adults section, around age 8 or 9 I was reading at a 8th grade level. I may not be the brightest bulb out there, but I consider myself intelligent. I LOVE to read, I love it so much that as a punishment my parents used to take my regular kindle away from me because it was a privilege for me to read. This article is so inaccurate that it makes me sick.
    There are plenty of other students in my classes who are also intelligent. So please, consider your words before ignorantly saying whatever idiotic assumption comes out of your mouth(or should I say that you type) that’s based on the sole fact that your son is stupid. Thanks for reading.

    • Ikmi

      “books from the young adults section” : LOL at the “young adult books” part. If you think YA books are close to real books then you’re really dumb. How strange it is the title of the article you’re commentating =)

      • fuckyounigger

        Feel better nigger? Like insulting kids you fucking kike?

  • Ikko

    A single caveman was smarter than the whole USA youth.

  • Mr A.B Normal :)

    Thanks for allowing guest posts as a lot of news sites make it as difficult as possible to comment on.

    Look up the Fabian Society and how it’s been in control of America since the late 1800s corrupting one generation at a time. They try not to use violent methods and instead use governments/politics to git their way with the good ole boys. ‘Scratch my back and I’ll scratch yours.” has been their philosophy leaking into the education system and the teachers are the ones putting up with the crap who remember what actual education was like.

    The coat of arms is wolf in sheeps clothing. They could’ve chosen a noble animal like a bird/lion/elephant or fox to show slyness but they choose specially a wolf in sheeps clothing.

  • Average HS student

    >sees many disgruntled kids protesting they are not like what the article describes
    >must resist urge to do the same
    I seriously doubt that this generation is as cataclysmic a jump from the last as everyone (at least everyone grounded in the dichotomy of everyone over 30/everyone under thirty) believes. Yes, the internet may have sped this process up, but “high literacy” has been in decline for quite a while-if I remember correctly, which I probably don’t-since the school reforms in industrializing America when individuals such as Rockefeller were donating to schools (but that’s a treatise of a tangent…). Our writing style has also undergone a major change between now and say, the 17th century, as evidenced by the writing style in books like Hobbes’ Leviathan (oh god). I seriously doubt that pamphlets would be written in the style of Common Sense today, or that the style of Common Sense would be taken as anything less than pretentiousness today. My first instinct is to deride today’s generation as well, but it can’t be all this simple. Usually what the mind loses in one area, it gains in another.
    The older generation and the younger generation must try to understand each other, or at least to tolerate each other. I listen to my mother’s ideas and give her advice careful consideration, even though I might not agree with it. We are all the products of our time, and unfortunately for us, we live in a fast paced time that doesn’t allow for much reading.
    Also, I don’t really know what sort of classes OP’s son is in, but damn. I wish I were at that school. Reading Vanity Fair and doing precalc in the 8th grade ain’t so hot either. Both scenarios illustrate that childhood is disappearing, whether through social pressure or academic pressure.
    I’m probably biased because I love programming and robotics though. I think technology is beautiful, but I agree that we should control it, not the other way around.

  • That Wise Guy

    Your kid is retarded.

  • OCM

    Wow…I have just only read the first page of this article and as someone attending graduate school who graduated a public high school in 2007 I’m shocked. I took four AP classes, two in English. Both required that we read actual books, write fifteen page papers, and take timed essays. I took the actual AP tests, some kids did not, but it was actual work. I think in one class, after READING King Lear we watched a film of it. My school was not tiny (2000 plus student body) or rich, and was racially mixed. Can it really have become this bad in only seven years that you don’t even have to write in an AP English course, let alone read a single text and analyze it?!

    • thinkitover

      My kids graduated in 2009 and 2012 and my youngest will graduate this year and yes it has gotten this bad this quickly. My kids were allowed to watch movies instead of reading the novels, to read condensed versions of books and to read magazines that were considered books. They brought home A papers with spelling and grammar mistakes that I had to point out to them and often had teachers that could not tell me what the purpose of the curriculum outcomes were. They have all turned out to love to read but I think that was more because my husband and I are avid readers. My daughter wants to be a teacher and is distressed at what she sees in the education system. She is frequently asked to edit classmates papers before they turn them in as the other students never learned proper spelling and grammar. Don’t mean to rant but as a parent it was so frustrating to see my kids served so badly by their schools. Glad you had an opportunity to get a good education but it seems that ship has sailed for any kid whose parents don’t greatly supplement what they get at school.

  • thinkitover

    Movies are not books!! Movies almost always condense books and take serious liberties with plot elements or events in a book to increase the entertainment value of the experience. Watching “The Great Gatsby” or any other movie based on a book is not at all the same as reading the book. Reading condensed versions of books is not the same as reading the actual book (any more than reading the Cole’s notes is) but that is exactly what my son’s middle school asked the class to do and considered that they had read the novel “Treasure Island.” I had to show him the actual novel and he read it and agreed that he had missed a lot by reading the condensed version.Critical thinking skills are important as are the ability to make inferences and to find meaning in written material and as a director of educational programming I see all the time that the kids in our programs don’t have these skills. Their parents by and large don’t have them either.

  • Lucas

    The US is weakening with not only their
    business, but their education. They should “rely” more on other
    countries and innovate new ideas and CHANGE the curriculum. Now, the US
    is slacking off more because we worry about other unnecessary things. Do we really
    need a break every month? Do the schools really need a “winter break”
    or a “ski week” when we have nothing to have a “break” on?
    While we are complaining that we need more breaks, Japan has surpassed us to
    the point where they give homework over the breaks (and summer vacation), have
    a 5-week summer vacation, and raised their curriculum to a YEAR difference. On
    top of that, the club/sports activity engages each student to have a goal they
    need to accomplish while juggling with the amount of homework they are given.
    The US nation NEEDS to grow already and just STOP the “21st Century
    Skills” and come up with a greater force that will make the students be
    PROUD of their education. As a student living in he US, I’m very shameful of
    myself for having the lack of education and slowly getting used to breaks. THE
    US NEEDS TO CHANGE.

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  • Andy

    Having read through this I can agree with some of your points, I do believe that the sheer amount of on tap entertainment is detrimental to this generations development and growth as human beings, but that being said, the internet is not sentient, it is not a brainwashing tool designed to make our children stupid, it does not live and breath as so many of us seem to believe, it was a tool developed for sole purpose of distributing and sharing information among all people, there is so much information on the internet that was completely unavailable to anyone who was not taking a PhD out on the internet, I personally use it as a learning tool as well as an entertainment tool, thanks to the wondrous world of information sharing I have understood things I could not have learned before due to access of information or budget, the internet has essentially propelled my career as an IT technician to heights I would have otherwise never reached, I would say that the internet as a tool and aid is fantastic, until the point hat someone become obsessed with it, the point being that we all need to limit ourselves and teach our children to use it responsibly, like with anything education is key, if you’re concerned about your son spending 6 hours a day playing WoW, then why didn’t you do something about it when it started, rather and just rolling over and saying “oh well, these crazy kids”, you are his parent and teacher, you are his guide in life, the kid does not know the days of the week, you see the names literally every day, the fact that he is so caught up in the digital world is not just his failure, it is also yours, you allowed him to become absorbed in the entertainment side of the internet, I can guarantee you have never even linked him to a site that explains anything he is interested him, that can give him a deeper insight in to his interests and at a higher level, the internet is not to blame for the state of this generation, irresponsible parenting is, you like so many other parents found an easy way out (letting your child sit around and play games all day and night) of parenting, that being the baby sitter that is the internet, blaming an tool for the deterioration of this generations mindset is like blaming the hammer for hitting your thumb.

    Remember, the internet only takes you to what you want to see, if your son didn’t want to see crap on his newsfeed he would stay away from Facebook, if he was raised and taught in a way that perpetuated the pursuit of knowledge as a good and enjoyable thing, then he would use the internet to that end, like I and so many others do.

    • Andy

      I wrote this at work and did not proof read it, sorry for the mistakes…

  • Danilo

    Your kid is not stupid, don’t over exaggerate

  • jake

    I would just like to point out a lot of the skills that were once considered imperative for life are no longer important. Yet older generations are evaluating our intelligence based on our ability to preform these outdated tasks.

    I can’t write in cursive, I can’t use the US customary units of measurement (I use metrics), I can’t understand analog clock time (quarter to seven), my spelling is terrible, my grammar leaves something to be desired for, and I don’t know how many days are in each month.

    However do I need to know these things? No one uses cursive anymore because long handwritten material in general is becoming obsolete, the world uses metrics so pints, quarts, and inches are becoming increasingly irrelevant, people tell time digitally now (its six forty-five), everything has spell check so why would I both perfecting my spelling, grammar does not need to be perfect (does anyone care that I answer the phone saying “This is him” instead of “This is he”), and there are calendars on every phone why would I need to know how many days in the month there are.

    However I can speak a foreign language fluently (German), I can program software, I can do advanced math, I can type 80 words a minute, ect.

    The world is dynamic and the skills that were once valued are now irrelevant. Judging a generation on outdated standards of intelligence is what is really stupid.

  • Kevin

    As a 4-year-old, I find this article reprehensible. I happen to be a voracious reader, and have read all the works of Herodotus in their entirety. I can also count all the way to ten. Far from feeling remorse after hearing your tale of woe, I could feel but pity for the young man who’s broodish upbringing neglected him in such a fashion as he is unable to name the days of the week. My mommy taught me those when I was no more than 3 and a half. I would also like to take this opportunity if I may to address the multitudes of pre-teens using the comment section of this site to brag about their accomplishments while simultaneously disparaging the young man who is the subject of this article. My message for you all is this: you know nothing. The fact that you read doesn’t make you impressive. What will happen to you is that you’ll do all the right things in school and win awards and be praised by your teachers, you’ll go to college and most likely pay far too much for a degree, graduate and be completely useless in the real world. Then you’ll end up cleaning septic tanks the rest of your life to support your drug habits. Enjoy life now, kids. It’s all down-hill from here.

    • Devin Magruder

      You’re making me want to kill myself more.

  • SG

    I personally think this is extremely crappy. I am twelve, and i know about logarithms and relative maximas and minimas. To say kids are getting stupider, well that’s just kinda crap.

  • SG

    also, youre facts are complete crap.. this is actually an outrage. YOU SAY WE ARE STUPIDER WELL I SAY YOU ARE STUPIDER

  • frankelee

    It just occurred to me, she might mean what day it is, rather than the days of the week. As in, he’s memorized all seven names for the days of the week, but frequently is unaware if it’s Tuesday, Wednesday or Thursday. Also it seems hard to believe that they watch movies and don’t read in an AP English course.

    • A thirteen year old child

      I believe she takes a combination of that and temporary brain farts.

  • TXKeydet08

    Ironically, I found this article after googling the phrase “we’re not as dumb as our parents.”

    I found myself wondering what the rest of the world had to say on the subject after musing on the Satanic Panic of the 80’s and 90’s. Reminiscing on the idiocy (and even danger) of that or any sort of moral panic, I began to wonder how any educated, rational adult – like my parents and those of my childhood friends – could possibly believe such nonsense.

    Apparently, the time has come for (I assume) educated, rational adults to start believing that technology is the current, youth-ruining boogeyman. As I approach an age where becoming a parent is increasingly imminent, I vow to raise my children with plenty of exposure to all manner of “unsavory” things, like Dungeons & Dragons, Heavy Metal and plenty of technology throughout.

    Actually, this article gives me great hope now that I think of it. Assuming the author’s premise is correct and children are becoming less intelligent, it means nothing but good things for my future children. I assure you, I will rear no dunces, but if the parents of what will be my progeny’s peers allow that kind of idiocy, my kids will look brilliant by comparison. In the land of Epsilon Semi-Morons, the kid with half a brain will be king. Just imagine what a child with a whole brain could do…

    • BlueBoomPony

      ” Just imagine what a child with a whole brain could do…”

      Get robbed and murdered by one of the idiots.

  • URAFaggot

    Yes. It is you. You are such an idiot. Blame yourself for being so stupid.

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  • BlueBoomPony

    As a newly fertilized zygote, I am offended by this article. I was conceived only 12 hours ago and I can already do tensor physics.

  • DisgruntledStudent

    Wow, what school district do you live in? I’m a sophomore in high school, and in my AP English class we regularly read and write essays on classics and have frequent projects on Shakespeare. I learned in biology that Louis Pasteur invented pasteurization. I have friends in AP European History who can tell you why wars were fought and even recite the dates they began and ended. And although I do go on Facebook and Instagram, I also use the Internet to do research on topics that I would like to learn about. Maybe it’s not the kid, maybe it’s the school system…

    P.S. Every teenager that comments on this thread protesting that our generation is not getting dumber, you’re certainly not helping our case by using incorrect grammar and awful spelling.

    • FranPoutsAgain

      Never met you, but I’m impressed!

    • mememememe

      Look, that’s impressive in all. I’m a 12 year old. Composed an album that people are anticipating on various music platforms,studies odinism, anatomy, and writes novels.

  • S.H.

    Hysterical and one-sided. Ridiculous if not outright disingenuous.

  • Cody

    Just because your kid doesn’t know the days of the week doesn’t mean all kids are stupid. I know how to use a ruler just like all my class. Not to mention a lot of my class are in algebra.

  • bookworm-girl

    I am twelve years old (thirteen in two days). Despite what a lot of my classmates claim, I’m still a kid- with the multiple stereotypes that end up being loaded on teens by adults who act as if we’re a completely different species, I’m not about to go around with the title of ‘teenager’.

    Anyways, I suppose I should share my opinion, though I suspect that, considering this was posted four years ago, nobody will be reading it.

    So. First of all, I’m not going to deny that children today are more addicted to technology. But really, it’s not like your generation wouldn’t have been as well if they had access to it.

    But please, PLEASE, do not think that everybody is like your son- who’s intelligence, I can assure you, is definitely below average. You cannot simply slap a stereotype on all teens of today and go, “Yep, our kids are retarded, nothing we can do.”

    I can assure you that we can spell. We read. Not all of us have Facebook. Your kid is a… special case, one of many (unfortunately)- though not all. But jeez, I sure hope my classes won’t be like that when I’m older.

    Getting back to the point, I am rather annoyed at your generalization of kids today. I’ll admit, technology is rather relevant today. I remember a time, a time where I was likely not born yet, where you could get away with not having an email and be perfectly normal. However, now if you want to have any kind of account on the internet an email account is a basic need.

    I’ll admit I’m not doing a very good job here of getting my point across, so I’ll end my rant here. Though, I am sure you get what I’m saying, right? Not all kids are retards, your son needs to see a doctor, kids DO read (adults just aren’t usually around to see it) actual books (not just Wattpad and Fictionpress), and technology isn’t necessarily a bad thing.

    Then again, what would I know?

  • Ironic

    Is it just me or is it ironic that they forgot a period in the sentence right under the title?

  • A 13 year old child

    I have a couple of problems with this article. Being 13
    years old, this rebuttal is bias. In fact, this rebuttal will only highlight the
    flaws in the article. The points in this rebuttal will be in the order of which
    the content that I found object-able in the article occurred.

    Page 1: The author says that SAT scores have fallen. While
    this is true for Reading and Writing, SAT Mathematics scores have in fact,
    increased. Mathematics is increasingly becoming more important in the job
    world. A possible reason for the decline in the other scores is that a greater
    portion of the population is taking the SAT test. There is in fact a 27.23%
    increase in the number of students taking the test in proportion to the
    population. Today, not just the smart kids are taking the test. The author says
    that her son Jake does not know the days of the week. I am assuming that since
    Jake is in college, he does not have any cognitive disorders. Every human on
    Earth forgets what day it is sometimes. Also, most human also has temporary brain
    farts, “What day came after Tuesday again?” In the final paragraph, the author states that
    “any group of parents” finds kids dumb. The kids they were exposed to were
    themselves and their peers. Naturally humans tend to view themselves and their
    peers as smarter. The author, using examples, the “new” generation has trouble
    memorizing facts. First of all memorization of facts does not measure
    smartness. The lack of these facts can be blamed on the education system not
    the children themselves. From what I found on the internet the average time for
    children to spend in front of a screen is somewhere between 5 and 8 hours in contrast
    to the author 8.5. The author’s mathematical equation is invalid because
    children spend a lot of time using digital devices in classrooms and from
    personal experience adolescences on average get much less that 8 hours of sleep.

    Page 2: Does the author think conversation is bad?
    Socialization is very important for cognitive development of children. Texting,
    email, calling, telegramming, and letter writing are all ways of having conversation
    with someone that is not physically close. I find that looking something up on
    Wikipedia is a much more efficient and accurate than I going to a library and
    looking for a 10 year old book that may or may not be there. The author lacks
    any numerical data for her studies.

    Page 3: In contrast to the author’s view, I fail to see how
    using cell phones to find infinite information is irreverent. There are many
    studies showing video games being helpful. (https://www.google.com/search?q=video+games+improve&oq=video+games+improve&aqs=chrome..69i57.3472j0j1&sourceid=chrome&es_sm=122&ie=UTF-8)
    While I have not done extensive research in this field, I have some theories.

    Call of Duty- helps reaction speed

    Skyrim- help choice making skills

    Etc.

    I propose that video games are actually better for people’s
    health than books. While books are passive, videogames require interaction and
    choice making.

    I do not know about most people but I spend a significant
    time on my computer reading articles and programming in Java.

    Page 4: Fiction is not necessarily better than interactive,
    choice making, video games. Also I cannot conceive how the author thinks
    listening to music is better than World of Warcraft (which has its own music) I
    do not see how rock music about drugs, sex and the likewise increases moral
    reasoning, as the author said but did not elaborate. In the most accepted moral
    development theory (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lawrence_Kohlberg's_stages_of_moral_development)
    there is nothing about music. However my reading of the utilitarianism article
    on Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Utilitarianism),
    has cause me to see the benefits of stage 6 thinking in Kohlberg’s Stages of
    Moral Development.

    Page 5: This article says that children’s attention spans
    are shorter. I do not see of source or even a name of the study for this
    information. Adolescences’ lack of conversation with their parents has
    historically happened, not just in the last generation. The author states that
    the “new” generation is stupid. In fact intelligence has been rising since the
    1950s if not before (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Flynn_effect#Rise_in_IQ).

    Page 6: The author implies that the “new” generation cannot
    understand Individualism. I started to read the Wikipedia article on
    Individualism. (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Individualism).
    The introductory text seemed perfectly simple to me, but maybe I’m a genius. I’m
    in advanced classes, after all. But so is Jake. I find it ironic how this
    article says that arguments on the Internet are stupid and yet this is the
    media the article is on.

    Page 7: The author implies that the “new” generation is
    somehow in charge. While I wish it were so, the “new” generation is not in
    charge. As well, the Web, video games, etc., are no different than the
    television or even the radio.

    Page 8: The author asserts that text messaging
    is somehow different from other means of conversation. With lack of evidence
    from the author I must assume that they are similar in effect on the mind. The example
    of the Florida mother who shook her son to death is a specific case designed to
    evoke emotional response. This is by no means a normal case.

    Page 9: The author asserts that somehow the ability to “restart”
    is changing our choice making decisions for the worse. If anything it helps our
    choice making decisions because we get to see that different actions on our
    part, leads to different results. I also fail to see the difference between a
    board game and a video game. I am also confused because the previous generation
    had video games as well. Television and
    video games are great ways to show emotion. For example I just watched a Person of Interest episode (in order to
    not spoil the series) where the protagonists had to make a choice of whether to
    kill an innocent person to save thousands of live. Unfortunately, in my
    opinion, they chose not to.

    Conclusion: I believe that TV is just like radio before it,
    texting is no different than talking or writing a letter, and the Internet is
    just a very efficient library. The
    author blames problems that has always existed on digital machines.

  • George

    The mis-education of American children is on purpose. Think about it, we’ve known how to educate people for centuries. The people who control the government by funding campaigns can do what they want if the citizens are a bunch of uneducated, TV, Hollywood obsessed couch potatoes. Would a truly educated citizenry allow America to be run into the ground? Free trade? Good for corporations, sucks for the middle class. Illegal aliens, good for employers sucks for the middle class. The uneducated are easier to control and easier for banks to fleece.

  • Thëo

    I’m 12, in honors, I write novels, and have an album out in November. HOW DARE YOU!!!!!!! This is just malevolence right here. The chronological hierarchy of today is so unfair!

  • Mortskab

    We are living in the “Asian Century” now. In this globalised economy are going to fall further and further back from the competition in east Asia.. been to Japan the average Japanese high scoo