Elegant Wedding: Drink of Choice

Our team of experts feels strongly about adding traditional beverages to the event — an easy, subtle way to incorporate a favorite cultural cuisine into any wedding.


Our team of experts feels strongly about adding traditional beverages to the event — an easy, subtle way to incorporate a favorite cultural cuisine into any wedding.

French: Bea Mazziotta, an event planner with Feastivities Events, recommends Lillet, a French aperitif, garnished with orange or lime slices.

Italian: Feast Your Eyes makes their own limoncello (granulated sugar, water, lemon zest and vodka), which they always “serve [iced] in little glasses, because people can get really drunk,” says Lynne Buono.

Indian: Bride Prathima Thumma’s guests loved her mango lassis (yogurt, mango pulp, ice cubes and sugar); her alcoholic version had less yogurt. Frog Commissary Catering suggests Ginger Kefir Limeade, left (ginger simple syrup, fresh lime juice and kefir lime-infused vodka).

Spanish: Cortney McCullough loves the idea of unusual sangrias (some variation of white wine, lemon, orange, lime and peach wedges, sliced strawberries, lemon- or limeade, sugar, apricot, peach- or berry-
flavored brandy, ginger ale and diced pineapple pieces with juice) such as cranberry-orange, kiwi or peach spiked with cognac or Grand Marnier for an added kick.

Asian: Jon Weinrott gets rave reviews for his tapioca bubble tea (large black tapioca pearls, green or black tea, chilled strawberry or peach puree, two-percent milk and sugar), updated with sweet-potato Soju vodkas from Korea. Anything sake, such as saketinis (vodka, lychee juice, sake and simple syrup), work well, too.

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