From Jim Kenney to Brian Roberts: What Philly’s Biggest Names Make Each Year

In case there was ever any doubt, yes, it pays to be a union boss in this town. Here’s a look at the annual compensation (including, in some cases, bonuses and perks) of other Philly bosses, ballers, players — and a few regular Joes.
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From left: Jim Kenney, Allison Vulgamore, Brian Roberts, Jeremy Hellickson and Sharon Pinkenson | Photo credit from left: Jeff Fusco, David Yellen, Adam Jones, Matt Rourke/Associated Press, Michael Spain-Smith

Brian Roberts, CEO, Comcast, $36.2 million

Bill Marrazzo, CEO, WHYY, $703,718
Marrazzo is among the highest-paid public broadcasting CEOs in the entire country.

Jeremy Hellickson, Phillies pitcher, $17.2 million
Thanks to Major League Baseball’s lack of a salary cap, he’s the best-paid athlete in Philly.

Timothy Rub, CEO, Philadelphia Museum of Art, $556,796

David L. Cohen, Senior executive vice president, Comcast, $17.9 million

Victor Abreu, Attorney, Defender Association of Philadelphia, $179,113

Thomas Spray, Chief of the Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, $8,376,430
A helluva lot of money, but he performs heart surgery on babies and saves their lives on a regular basis.

Martin Hamann, Executive chef, the Union League, $450,050
We’re pretty sure this makes him the best-paid chef in Philly.

Yannick Nézet-Séguin, Music director, the Philadelphia Orchestra $1,100,000
Major perk: The Orchestra pays his taxes on his behalf.

Sharon Pinkenson, Executive director, Greater Philadelphia Film Office, $228,273

Jason Peters, Eagles left tackle, $11 million
Though Peters was recently asked to take a pay cut, this is what he earned last year. Meanwhile, quarterback Carson Wentz took home about $5 million for his first season.

Amanda Schoonover, actress, $28,477
The popular local actress and playwright is a two-time Barrymore Award winner.

Sister Mary Scullion, Executive director, Project HOME, $97,205
Her CFO earns more than twice that.

Police Officer, New Recruit, Philadelphia Police Department, $49,477
The entry-level salary. Well-known homicide captain James Clark pulls in about $110,000.

John Dougherty, Business manager, Local 98, $406,532

Anthony Clark, City commissioner chairman, City of Philadelphia, $138,889
Not bad for a guy who seems to have trouble showing up for work.

Meryl Levitz, CEO, Visit Philly
$240,000

Michael Weaver, Neurosurgeon, Temple University Hospital, $1,052,918

Bus Driver, Highest-Paid, Philadelphia School District, $44,351

Richard Ross Jr., Police commissioner, City of Philadelphia, $240,000

Terry Gross, Host, WHYY’s Fresh Air, $320,451
Radio Times host Marty Moss-Coane clocks in at $158,061, though we expect she’ll be earning less going forward thanks to her recently announced reduced schedule.

Bernard Havard, President, Walnut Street Theatre, $687,323

William HiteSuperintendent, Philadelphia School District, $300,000
The female superintendent of Abington School District—the highest-paid public-school head in Pennsylvania—makes $4,000 more.

Allison Vulgamore, CEO, the Philadelphia Orchestra, $776,143

Steven Collis, CEO, AmerisourceBergen, $9,978,176

Seth Williams, District attorney, City of Philadelphia, $175,572
Of course, that doesn’t count the free $45,000 roof repairs he got.

Jim Kenney, Mayor, City of Philadelphia, $218,000
One of the nation’s five highest-paid mayors.

Assistant District Attorney, City of Philadelphia, $51,956
The entry-level salary for ADAs.

Correctional Officer, Highest-Paid, City of Philadelphia, $139,201
Base salary is $47,196; the difference is overtime.

Teacher, Highest-Paid, Meredith School, Philadelphia School District, $90,051
Compared to $41,691 for the lowest-paid.

*Many salaries are based on the most recent SEC filings, form 990s and published reports available at press time; some CEO salaries include forms of compensation other than salary, such as stock awards and bonuses.

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First published as “Bold Names, Big Bucks” in the April 2017 issue of Philadelphia magazine.